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  • President Harding's Body Lying in State, East Room, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1112008. The text reads: "PRESIDENT HARDING’S BODY LYING IN STATE, EAST ROOM OF THE WHITE HOUSE. President Harding has returned to Washington. A little over two years ago he came to Washington with high hopes, lofty purposes and strong determination to serve his country, which he loved, to the best of his ability. In the few short months intervening between these visits he accomplished much. His labors now are ended. It is fitting for us to review some of the out-standing accomplishments of his short administration. When he was inaugurated the world had entered upon the period of reconstruction following the greatest war in all history. America was still technically at war with Germany and Austria. Although hostilities had ceased more than two years before, no treaty had been signed between it and these nations. One of the first tasks was to cause peace treaties to be signed with these countries that should be just and, at the same time, advantageous to all the parties concerned. This was done. The next great historical event in the administration of President Harding was the assembling of the Conference on Disarmament. As the years go by, this will, without doubt, stand out as the greatest historical event in the relations of nations. A few days before his death Mr. Harding said, 'The outstanding historical monumental achievement is the World’s Conference on the Limitation of Armaments. Only a few days ago the Government of the French gave the ratification which makes unanimous the approval of the nations concerned and confirms the dawn of a new era in international co-operation for world peace.' This conference was triumphant in two accomplishments: It relieved and limited the burdens and found a way to remove the causes of misunderstanding which lead to war. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • The Body of President Harding Leaves for the Cemetery, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1112017. The text reads: "BODY OF PRESIDENT HARDING LEAVING FATHER’S HOME, MARION, OHIO, ON WAY TO CEMETERY A one-time country editor came back yesterday to sleep for a night again under his father’s roof in Marion and with him came the grief of the nation, of the world—that he was dead. Warren Harding was back again among the neighborly folk of his home town. The brief day of his greatness was but a memory treasured by the Nation. His life work was done. The home folk came eagerly with tears streaming down their cheeks to look their last on his dead face, peaceful with the calm of eternity. It was easy to believe that the genial soul that has fled might even burst the bonds of death and move the still lips to happy greetings of these thronging old friends in the modest parlor of his father’s house. To him they were always 'Jack' and 'Tom,' while he had been 'W. G.' and 'The Boss' in the glad, wholesome, simple days before a people claimed him for the highest service to them and to the flag. But it was Harding the man, not the President, who came home yesterday and it is Harding the man who will be laid to sleep to-day within a stone’s throw from the plot where his mother lies. To-day the city is thronged with thousands, high and low in degree, who have come together, stricken with sadness, to express their reverence and love for their departed leader. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Sitka, Alaska, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111993. The text reads: "PRESIDENT AND MRS. HARDING AND OFFICIAL PARTY BEFORE GREAT ALASKAN TOTEM POLE AT SITKA We are now with the Presidential Party before a great Alaskan Totem Pole at Sitka. Complex mythological phenomena such as Totemism cannot be readily and accurately defined. A tribe or group of tribes which have Totemism may be said to comprise a Totemic Complex. The essential aspects of a Totemic Complex are three in number: (1) The Totemic Tribe is subdivided into a number of social units, usually clans and sometimes families. (2) The people of the tribe possess a set of beliefs and practices, mythological, religious, ceremonial, artistic, economic, which almost in all cases center around certain attitudes—animals, plants or inanimate objects. (3) The beliefs and practices are distributed among the people of the tribes in such a way that the beliefs and practices of each social unit, while not identical with those of all the other social units, are equivalent to them. These poles have various significances, the most common being that of a genealogical tree. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111998. The text reads: "PRESIDENT HARDING MEETS REPRESENTATIVES OF THE DOMINION GOVERNMENT AT VANCOUVER, B. C. On June 26, President Harding disembarked from the U. S. Naval Transport, Henderson, at Vancouver, B. C. The arrival of the chief executive of the United States was made the occasion of a military display excelling anything previous on his trip. Formal welcome was extended at the pier by the officials of the Dominion, the Province of British Columbia and the City of Vancouver. After the formal reception at the pier was over, the President was conducted, in a parade through the city, to Stanley Park where he delivered the principal address of his visit. The President was received at Vancouver with all the official courtesy which the British, everywhere, so well know how to extend. The people of Vancouver were deeply sensible of the honor paid them by the visit of the chief executive of their great neighbor on the south and accorded him a reception not excelled in warmth and enthusiasm by any he had received in the United States. He made several addresses and every minute of the day was fully occupied from the time he landed early in the forenoon until he returned to the transport about ten o’clock at night. A visit to another nation by such a chief executive as President Harding cannot fail to develop fraternal feeling between that nation and ours. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Funeral Train, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1112003. The text reads: "FUNERAL TRAIN, BEARING BODY OF PRESIDENT HARDING, COMING INTO CHICAGO, ILL. Across the continent the President’s funeral train is slowly speeding. At every station crowds stand bareheaded as it passes. At all stops evidences of deep grief are shown in many ways. Tears are shed, wreaths of flowers are given. Not only along the railway, by which the train passes, but throughout the entire nation there is deep mourning. A sorrowing people from the Atlantic to the Pacific gathered in sessions, humbled before the Divine Providence which, in infinite wisdom, had taken from the Republic its leader, to pray for strength for the new leader and for consolation for Mrs. Harding in her hour of grief. All the people, regardless of political beliefs, believed in the man, Harding; in his sincerity, sanity, integrity and democracy. Every man and woman in our great Union mourns his death as they mourn the death of a dear friend. Not only so, they know that the Nation has lost a wise, calm, sane and patriotic leader. Mr. Harding had a personality which charmed his fellow countrymen in a rare and compelling way. It charmed them because it gave forth in a pleasing manner the qualities that have already been stated. The problems that have to be solved in the administration of the affairs of a great nation are many and complex. Everybody felt that President Harding had been doing the best that he could do to solve them. He was essentially a quiet yet industrious doer rather than a noisy, spectacular advertiser. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Procession Leaves the White House, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1112012. The text reads: "PRESIDENT HARDING’S BODY LEAVING THE WHITE HOUSE, WASHINGTON, D. C. It is but a few weeks since President Harding left the White House to begin his memorable trip for study and observation through the west, through Alaska and, later, through Hawaii and Panama. His departure then was made with high hopes and lofty ideals. It was his wish to meet his constituents face to face; to learn how they live and work; to sense their thought and feeling not only with regard to their daily employment but to the policies of their government. This information was sought not through idle curiosity for the mere purpose of gossip but for the program of action that might be entered upon by a wise executive based upon the first-hand information that could be secured in such an observational trip. How changed this departure from the White House. Before, the citizens, men, women and children, on the streets hailed the President and wished him God-speed and a prosperous and successful journey. To-day, the streets are crowded with those who weep because they mourn a fallen friend and a wise counselor. It now seems to those who crowd the walks on the way from the White House to the station, where President Harding’s body will be deposited, that their desires and hopes have died with the death of their beloved President. Copyright by the Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Alaska, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111977. The text reads: "PRESIDENT’S TRAIN IN ALASKA-WORK, HOOVER, WALLACE, STEESE, BONE, MRS. JENNINGS, PRESIDENT HARDING, GILLETTE, AND MRS. HARDING A study of this set reveals a prominent characteristic of President Harding and his administration. He realized, as he himself said frequently, that the affairs of the government of this great country are so numerous and so complex that no one man ought to attempt to attend to all of them. He believed that all American citizens, whether in private life or in public life, should contribute of their thought to the best interests of the Union. He surrounded himself with an able cabinet. He consulted them frequently and freely and assigned to them certain duties to perform and, having assigned them, gave them free hand to produce results. One of the most note-worthy events of the administration was the Disarmament Conference which was called by President Harding in the Fall of 1921. The principal nations of the world sent representatives to this conference which was held at Washington in November, 1921, just after Armistice Day. In the first meeting Mr. Hughes presented plans looking toward the lightening of the war burden of the nations. A little occurrence at this time shows the broadness of the President. When asked concerning a point mentioned in the conference he expressed his opinion. Almost immediately, he was told that Secretary Hughes, Chairman of the Conference, said different. 'Very well,' said Mr. Harding with a smile, 'Hughes knows. He is arranging this affair.' A smaller man would have tried to explain. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Sitka, Alaska, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111992. The text reads: "PRESIDENT HARDING SPEAKING AT SITKA, ALASKA President Harding terminated his visit to Alaska at Sitka exactly two weeks from the day he first stepped on the soil of the territory. These two weeks gave the President and his party a new vision of Alaska and, as he said, a new determination to do all in his power to bring' this great territory to its fullest degree of development. Whatever the federal government may do in the future to aid Alaska, the people there believe that much has already been done because of the two weeks spent by the Presidential Party in their midst. They believe that the visit has done much already to enlighten the people of the United States regarding Alaskan resources and possibilities and to dispel the old ideas that were derived from the designation of the territory as an 'ice box.' The President, during his two weeks stay, visited eleven towns and several small settlements; made three trips into the interior; and sailed along more than a thousand miles of the territory’s coast line. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Alaska, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111967. The text reads: "PRESIDENT AND MRS. HARDING AND PARTY We are now aboard the Henderson with President and Mrs. Harding and many distinguished members of the Presidential Party. In this party are Secretaries Hoover, Work and Wallace, Speaker Gillett of the House, Ex-Governor Spry, and Governor Bone of Alaska, and others. The presence of these members of the President’s Cabinet and of the other illustrious members of the Presidential Party is significant. It has been said of the President, and doubtless is true, that he cared nothing for the glory and honor of high place but he did care a great deal for decency, honesty, service, good faith, and good will. He loved his friends and he was proud of their affection for him and he requited it well; but it is a great mistake to assume that he listened to them in preference to the counsels of his chosen advisors. With him, friendship could not possibly take the place of service. If this statement should be doubted, test its truth by reference to the able and high-minded men with whom he officially surrounded himself, and others in authority who constituted this Presidential Party. In this connection keep clearly in mind the purpose of this Alaskan Trip. It was primarily to secure first-hand information relative to Alaska, its resources and problems and faults in its administration. This information was sought to serve as a foundation for future laws governing the administration of this important possession. The information sought by the President in this tour will not be entirely lost because of his untimely death because the wise, fore-sighted and far-seeing patriotic men constituting his party will use, without doubt, such information as has been secured for the benefit not only of Alaska but of the entire country and the world. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Wrangell, Alaska, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111965. The text reads: "SECRETARY WORK, GOVERNOR BONE AND PRESIDENT HARDING AT WRANGELL, ALASKA President Harding was intensely patriotic. He said in his Fourth of July speech at Tacoma that, 'A republic worth living in is worth living for and a republic worth defending is worth our patriotic vigilance against all the powers that would destroy it.' Nothing that any man could say would reveal a higher order of patriotism than this. The President is not only intensely patriotic but intensely religious. In his memorial sermon delivered in Denver on Sunday morning, June 24th, he said, 'I tell you, my countrymen, the world needs more of Christ; the world needs the spirit of the Man of Nazareth. * * * If we could bring into the relationships of humanity among ourselves and among the nations of the earth, the brotherhood that was taught by Christ, we would have a restored world; we would have little or none of war and we would have a new hope for humanity throughout the globe. * * * If we are going to make of this America of ours all that the fathers sought, if we are going to make it true to the institutions for which they are built, we must continue to maintain religious liberty quite as well as civil and human liberty. * * * We have been getting too far away from the spiritual and too absorbed in our material existence which tends to make us a sordid people.' Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Metlakatla, Alaska, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111960. The text reads: "ALASKAN SALMON LOOKS GOOD TO PRESIDENT AND MRS. HARDING AT METLAKATLA, ALASKA. President Harding is now on Alaskan soil. He is the first President to visit Alaska, our greatest outlying possession, while in office. His program of travel and speech-making on this tour is very extensive and covers not only Alaska but many western points within the boundaries of the United States of scenic and industrial interest. The purposes of this tour are two. (a) To learn at first hand of the resources and economic conditions of the points visited; and (b) to become acquainted with the people along the route and to give them his viewpoint of what the government is attempting to do for them; what it has already accomplished; and what it hopes to accomplish in the near future. Our people, generally speaking, believe in our government, honor the head of our government, and listen with respect, if not with thorough accord, to what the President may say. It would be well if all our people, including the President, Congress and others in authority, might have complete and definite information concerning Alaska. You may not know, but if it were possible to pick Alaska up and place it on the United States, its boundaries would extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Not only has Alaska a great extent of territory, but it has several valuable resources. Enough salmon have already been caught in Alaskan waters to pay the purchase price for the territory. In addition, other immensely valuable products of Alaska are lumber, fur, seal, gold, coal, iron and probably oil. Copyright by The Keystone View Company."
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Portland, Oregon, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111957. The text reads: "PRESIDENT HARDING AT THE U S. VETERANS HOSPITAL, NO. 77, PORTLAND, OREGON We are with President Harding as he leaves this hospital. We were with him as he passed through the wards and as he stopped from time to time to give a word of cheer to the sick who were there upon the cots. Mrs. Harding, also, gave words of comfort and to each she handed a flower and left a message of love and good wishes as she passed on. One could not see the President on his passage through these sick wards and hear his sympathetic yet cheerful words to the boys without realizing more and more the sympathy of his great heart and his patriotic devotion to his country and especially to those who risked their all in its service. President Harding said, addressing the group who assembled to welcome him to the hospital, 'I want to tell you, if ever there is another war, we will do more than draft the boys. We will draft every dollar and every essential.' To all who took up arms to fight for their country and, especially, those who gave up their lives, all America should give the highest honor that we know how to give. The widows and children of the soldier dead are cared for, as they should be, by the nation. All those who fought and bled in this country’s cause ill all our wars deserve the best that we can give them. President Harding assured the soldier sick that he would keep everlastingly at it to see that full justice be meted out by the government to its wounded and needy veterans of the World War and would consecrate himself, his every influence and endeavor, to prevent another on the part of the United States. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Ketchikan, Alaska, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111963. The text reads: "PRESIDENT HARDING LAYS CORNERSTONE TO NEW MASONIC TEMPLE, KETCHIKAN, ALASKA The President is in the act of laying the cornerstone to the new Masonic Temple at Ketchikan, Alaska. He was an active member of many fraternal orders. He joined them because of his great love for his fellowmen which caused him to seek their society and friendship. He believed most thoroughly in the high ideals of the fraternal orders to which he belonged. It was his theory that if people knew each other better the causes for discord and strife would be largely removed. At the coliseum in St. Louis on June 21, where the President made his first speech to the Rotarians he declared that if he could found a Rotary Club in every community throughout the world he would do so,—and then would guarantee tranquility and a forward march for the universe. As we all know, the motto of the Rotary Club is, 'He profits most who serves best.' He said that statesmen have their problems, governments have theirs and individuals have theirs. If we could plant the spirit of Rotary throughout the world and, having planted it, turn it to practical application there would not be much wrong with the human procession. Good local government depends upon the character of the citizens composing the community. Likewise, good state government depends upon the character of the people composing the several local units. This idea may be extended to include national government. We can have a great nation only as we have great cities,—and we can have great cities only as we have upright, intelligent and industrious citizens composing them. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Ketchikan, Alaska, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111962. The text reads: "PRESIDENT HARDING, FIRST PRESIDENT TO VISIT ALASKA, SPEAKING AT KETCHIKAN We now see President Harding, the first President to visit Alaska, speaking to an Alaskan audience. The President made this trip to Alaska to see with his own eyes the conditions there. Almost from the day he took his great office the so-called Alaska Problem had been dinned into his ears. Efforts had been made by some interests to commit him to their policies. Equally strong efforts had been made by other opposing factions to commit him to their policies. For the last fifteen years, Alaska has been a promoter of storm centers at Washington. Public attention was focused upon Alaska as the battleground. The last great fight was on the conservation of our national resources and particularly, of the forests and coal resources. With that native caution and good sense which characterized [unintelligible], the President had quietly waited evidently deciding that it would be wise for him to get first-hand knowledge before yielding to the clamors of those who were urging many and revolutionary changes in the conduct of Alaskan affairs. The President talked with the citizens of Alaska in all walks of life and in all lines of employment. He questioned them closely and checked their statements carefully against the information that he had caused to be prepared for him before he left Washington. When he returned to the States on July 27, at four o’clock in the afternoon, he made his last formal appearance before a group of his fellow citizens. In that speech he discussed at great length and with clearness all the problems that had been raised within the preceding years at Washington relative to Alaska. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Hutchinson, Kansas, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111934. The text reads: "PRESIDENT HARDING HOLDS THE BABY AND TALKS TO THE FARMERS, HUTCHINSON, KANSAS While at Hutchinson, Kansas, the President not only assisted in harvesting wheat but visited with the farmers, secured their confidence and in return gave them his, acquiring much information of value relative to the condition of the wheat-growing interests in the middle west. Later, in an informal way, with a babe in his arms and surrounded by fathers, mothers and small children, talked to them in a homely and friendly manner. President Harding was a believer in the home. His own home life may well be a model for all home makers in this country. He loved children. On many occasions in this most note-worthy trip he was surrounded by 'kiddies'; and childhood never errs in its estimate of those who address them. They are instinctively attracted to the one who is sincere. They are just as surely repelled by the one who is insincere. He says: 'The mother who tirelessly seeks rightly to train her children, to instill into them that indefinable essence which we know as good breeding will be performing a great service. Herein is the supreme advantage of the Public School System. I have never been able to find much satisfaction in the good fortune of families, who, when they are able to do it, prefer to take the children out of the Public Schools and give them the doubtful advantage of private schools. I think we should cling to the democracy of the Public Schools.' Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Idaho, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111941. The text reads: "PRESIDENT HARDING GETTING FIRST HAND KNOWLEDGE ABOUT IRRIGATION IN IDAHO Our government Reclamation Service has been in operation for twenty years and the results of its work during that period have been the furnishing of a complete water supply to almost a million and a quarter acres of land in the west that was formerly arid and a supplemental water supply to over a million acres of privately controlled land that formerly was arid at a cost of $135,000,000. Of government reclamation projects there are now over 30,000 averaging 53 acres. In agriculture, the work of this service has added another state to the Union; for the products of the land made fertile by the water supply equal in value the farm products of the State of West Virginia or the combined farm productions of Vermont and Tennessee. In addition to the irrigation furnished through the Government Service, there are many privately owned irrigation plants ranging in size from the little dam of the hillside brook to those that are larger and more expensive. President Harding believed in reclamation and water utilization. In his speech at Spokane he declared against locking up the public domain as a treasure house of potential wealth. The President believed in reclamation. He believed in conservation, but only that form of conservation which results, or should result, in development. He believed that wise development of national resources does not often result in their disastrous diminution. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Butte, Montana, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111943. The text reads: "PRESIDENT WARREN G. HARDING President Harding is a native of Ohio, having been born at Corsica, November 2, 1865. After studying at the Ohio Central University, he entered the newspaper business, becoming editor and publisher of the Marion Star. In 1910 he ran for the office of governor of Ohio but was defeated. In 1914 he was elected to the United States Senate. When the Republican party split in 1912, he was a 'stand-patter' and supported Mr. Taft. In 1916 he was chairman of the Republican national convention and in 1920 elected president. In the fall of 1921 Mr. Harding invited the principal nations to send representatives to a disarmament conference to be held in Washington, Nov. 12, 1921, just after Armistice Day. In the first meeting Mr. Hughes presented plans looking toward the lightening of the war burdens of the nations. A little occurrence at this time shows the broadness of the man. When asked concerning an agreement reached in the conference, President Harding expressed an opinion. Almost immediately he was told that Mr. Hughes, Chairman of the Convention, said different. 'Very Well', said Mr. Harding with a smile 'Hughes knows. He is arranging this affair.' A smaller man would have tried to explain; but having chosen Mr. Hughes to act, Mr. Harding was ready to accept the results of his work. Steel strikes, coal strikes, railroad strikes, all sorts of labor troubles disturbed Mr. Harding’s administration and yet the industrial condition of the country improved. Mr. Harding is very democratic and easily reached by the people. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Yellowstone National Park, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111946. The text reads: "ENJOYING THE WONDERS OF YELLOWSTONE FALLS, PRESIDENT AND MRS. HARDING AND PARK SUPT. ALBRIGHT, YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WYO. President and Mrs. Harding are now studying and enjoying the wonders of Yellowstone National Park. This wonderful park with its magnificent scenes is but one of many that have been set aside by the National Government for tile instruction of our own people and others who enjoy the privilege of visiting them. They might well be termed the playgrounds and natural colleges of America. The preservation of these twenty or more majestic and beautiful natural scenes is a worthy function of the National Government. These regions are of value because of their scenic beauty and educational importance for the instruction and amusement of all the American people who can afford to go to them. It is in keeping with the purposes of the President’s tour, namely, to study the work of the government and its results, at first hand, that he is visiting these national domains. The 'President Harding Set of 100' scenes includes eight on this subject of national parks every one of which will challenge the attention of students not only of scenery and of government but of natural science as well. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Yellowstone National Park, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111947. The text reads: "PRESIDENT HARDING AT INSPIRATION POINT, YELLOWSTONE FALLS, WYO. While President Harding was on this tour of study and observation, he prepared, in a careful manner, a speech which he expected to deliver at San Francisco. Secretary Christian delivered the address which President Harding was 'to have given. The President said that when his administration came into responsibility four main tasks were undertaken, namely; first, the establishment of peace with the Central Powers; second, the protection from the chaos of conflicting national interests, the just rights of the United States and the legitimate interests of American citizens; third, the creation of an international situation, so far as the United States might contribute, which would give the best assurance of peace for the future; fourth, the pursuit of the traditional American policy of friendly co-operation with our sister Republics of the Western Hemisphere. The President might have added at least two others that, to the American people, seem of equal, if not greater, importance, namely: the problem of unemployment and the problem of rapidly increasing taxation. We remember distinctly how depressing the non-employment situation was. Since then, matters have been reversed. Now, we have to consider ways and means to fill a million jobs which want workers and cannot find them. The President, with his characteristic generosity, did not take credit to himself for this change in the condition of our people. Rather, he said, that this change was brought about by co-operation. What we have done, no other people has paralleled. The budget system put into operation under President Harding’s administration has resulted in the saving of hundreds of thousands of dollars. This will, ultimately, reduce our burdens of taxation. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Meacham, Oregon, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111951. The text reads: "PRESIDENT HARDING SPEAKING AT ‘'OLD OREGON TRAIL' CELEBRATION, MEACHEM [sic], OREGON At this little town of Meachem [sic], the President is carried back in fancy, 80 years, to the blazing of the 'Oregon Trail' which saved an empire to the United States. At the conclusion of a short trip over the site of the old Trail, in an old time coach drawn by six horses and escorted by cow-boys, cow-girls, and Indians, he is addressing 20,000 citizens of the North West who assembled to meet the President and to commemorate the blazing of the Trail. He said in part, 'The American People owe to those pioneers a debt of gratitude which they can never repay. Their victory proclaimed the strength of resolute purpose to do for themselves. They did not ask the Government to do, only to sanction or permit. We rejoice in the possession of the great domain which they secured and the life that they made possible to the aspiring, confident, resourceful Northwest. I find new assurances in recalling the heroism, the resolution, the will to conquer, of these pioneers. Government may well provide opportunity, but the worth-while accomplishment is the privilege and the duty of men.' (The Oregon Trail—1843: Arthur Guiter-man. 'Two hundred wagons, rolling out to Oregon, Two hundred wagons, ranging free and far, Two hundred wagons, rolling, rumbling, roll-mg on, Two hundred wagons, following a star! The British trader shakes his head and weighs his nation’s loss, For where those hardy settlers come the stars and stripes will toss * * * * The cabins rise, the fields are sown, and Oregon is theirs!' Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Hutchinson, Kansas, Side B
    Keystone View Company
    reverse image
    This is the reverse view of image number 1111932. The text reads: "PRESIDENT HARDING IN A FRIENDLY CHAT, HUTCHINSON, KANSAS As we stand in this group about the President we are reminded in a most pleasing and emphatic way that his activity on this occasion is the one that is perhaps most natural and most pleasing to him. We know him as our friend. This means, that he does not spend his time chatting with us for the mere purpose of gossip. We firmly believe that he is interested in us, that he loves us and that he talks with us to know what we think, how we feel, what we do and what our ideals are. Moreover, he tells us frankly and as fully as the occasion will permit what he thinks, believes and desires for our welfare and for the welfare of our nation. The President is a great believer in co-operation. He believes that permanent and great success in a democratic form of government is possible only when all the people, of whatever rank and station, co-operate. He said to us that two years ago when things generally looked bad, team work was inaugurated and all the members of the team pulled together. Since then, things have improved and to-day, are quite satisfactory. It is a source of pride, satisfaction and gratitude to the national administration to have been able to contribute something of suggestion, leadership and direction to this accomplishment. He did not claim much, but the great end could not have been attained without the complete unity already mentioned. Two years ago there were approximately 5,000,000 workers in our country without jobs. That was bad, but since then matters have reversed and we are now obliged to worry about ways and means of filling a half million jobs that want workers and cannot find them. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Hutchinson, Kansas, Side B
    Keystone View Company
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    This is the reverse view of image number 1111931. "PRESIDENT HARDING 'TEEING OFF,' COUNTRY CLUB GOLF COURSE, HUTCHINSON, KANS. President Harding is here enjoying a favorite form of recreation. It is no secret that President Harding has been sensitive to occasional criticisms of his golfing tendencies. These criticisms have been thoughtless and unwarranted. Every intelligent, thoughtful person knows that it is impossible for a strenuous brain-worker to do his best and accomplish his most without regular relaxation and exercise. The Presidency is a most difficult, trying and exacting office to fill. Outdoor exercise, therefore, is supremely necessary to the physical well-being of the occupant of the White House. It is not only necessary for the physical well-being of the President, but is equally necessary for the wise administration of the affairs of our nation. Most of our Presidents in later years have realized the value of outdoor exercise and have tried to get it in one form or another. Few have been so strenuous in this respect as Col. Roosevelt but some have gone to the other extreme in denying themselves relief from the strain of office. It is probably true that many of our citizens thought that the Alaskan Trip would give President Harding a glorious vacation. There is no doubt that he was enjoying himself until his unexpected illness interrupted the trip, but as a matter of fact, he worked as hard, if not harder, than when he was in Washington. One of the disadvantages of high office is that the man who holds it is denied privacy. He must be on dress-parade constantly. He has to meet reception committees, attend countless banquets, listen to grievances and prepare and deliver speeches on the issues of the day. All these things come when the President is supposed to be having a holiday. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Hutchinson, Kansas, Side B
    Keystone View Company
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    This is the reverse view of image number 1111930. The text reads: "PRESIDENT HARDING DRIVING A TRACTOR BINDER, HUTCHINSON, KANSAS We are now with President Harding and his party in a 100-acre Kansas wheat field near Hutchinson. Before arriving here the President’s train travelled for miles through Kansas wheat fields and upon arrival he, with Mrs. Harding and other members of the party, were taken for a ride into the country where the harvest was just beginning, The President drove a binder in this immense field, shocked up some of the harvested grain in both the Kansas and Ohio ways and obtained first-hand information as to the problems of the wheat farmers of the middle west. When the Chief Executive demonstrated that he had not forgotten his farmer-boy days in Ohio and, as he climbed down from the tractor which drew the 10-foot binder, Governor Davis of Kansas exclaimed: 'You are some farmer, Mr. President,' and the farm hands called out 'You are all right, Chief.' The President had two purposes in performing this work in the harvest field. (a) Like any red-blooded man reared on a farm he enjoyed repeating his early experiences. (b) He wished to get the active cooperation of the western farmers in giving him complete and truthful information relative to the condition of the wheat growing sections of the west. We may add: these acts of the President, together with his conversations with the farmers and farm hands emphasized once more the truth that he was a plain man, one of the common people and no mere snob nor office holder. Copyright by The Keystone View Company"
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, Martinsburg, West Virginia, Side B
    Keystone View Company
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    This is the reverse view of image number 1111929. The text reads: "PRESIDENT HARDING MAKING ONE OF HIS FIRST SPEECHES ON HIS ALASKAN TRIP AT MARTENSBURG, MD. [Note: this was Martinsburg, West Virginia] We are now standing in the crowd listening to President Harding as he speaks from the train near the beginning of his great Alaskan Tour. His speech is upon the welfare of the nation. It is instructive and inspiring. Thinking of the great office held by him, naturally our minds revert to his personal and political struggles and career. After he graduated from college and became established as proprietor and editor of a prosperous small-town newspaper in spite of poverty and adversity, he then became known to his townspeople and to his state as a wise and coming man. In 1900 he entered the State Senate of his native State, Ohio. He was reappointed to this office. In 1904 he was sworn in as Lieutenant Governor of Ohio. In 1914 he was elected United States Senator from Ohio. In 1920 he won the Republican Presidential nomination and was elected. In 1921 he was inaugurated President. He is a striking example of what can be accomplished, in this great democratic country of ours, by a young man born in poverty but who has strength of body, of intellect, and will and who, with it all, has high ideals and exemplary habits. He became President in critical and disturbing times. The country was just emerging from a long, trying and expensive war. International adjustments and readjustments must be made and made promptly. Incidental to the readjustment program, early in President Harding’s Administration, the World Conference on Disarmament was called. In order that the finances of the government might be adjusted and cared for wisely, he put into effect the governmental budget system which has already resulted in the saving to the country of three billion dollars, two billion of which were incidental to the expenses of the war. Copyright by The Keystone View Company."
  • President Harding's Voyage of Understanding, the White House, Side B
    Keystone View Company
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    This is the reverse view of image number 1111928. The text reads: "PRESIDENT AND MRS. HARDING VISITING LINCOLN MEMORIAL BEFORE THE ALASKAN TRIP. We are now standing before the beautiful memorial to ex-President Lincoln at Washington, D. C. President and Mrs. Harding are just here for a final visit, before starting upon the great Alaskan tour that they have prepared to take, to do homage to one of our martyred Presidents. As we see the President and his wife, we realize again, in an emphatic way, that he is a patriotic man; that he loves his country and loves to honor those who have served it as did his martyred predecessor. This thought leads to others concerning the President. He is a plain man, modest, unassuming and calm. He is a man who sprang from the common people ;born in 1865 of poor parents in a small Ohio town. By his own effort, he put himself through college. He later became the owner and publisher of a small newspaper. He struggled with poverty but, in spite of adversity, he gave his country paper a reputation that was more than local. He is a home-loving men [sic]. He is devoted to his father and his father’s family. He is devoted to his wife who has, since their marriage, been his constant companion both at home and abroad. Recently he was in almost constant attendance during her illness covering a period of many weeks. She, likewise, is his admirer, advisor and lover. Perhaps no one person has exerted greater influence upon the political thought and action of the President than has his devoted wife. In his home-making instinct, in his clean and devoted home life, the President may well stand as an example. Copyright by The Keystone View Company."