Are you sure you want to delete this item? Are you sure you want to delete these 0 items?

Download

Oops! Something went wrong! It doesn't appear to have affected your data. Please notify your system administrator if the problem persists. Access denied
Your session was expired. Page will be reloaded.

Processing...

Your assets are ready. If the download does not start automatically, click Download.

Add assets to album

  • White House Candlelight Tour, Nixon Administration
    Joe McCary
    Entrance Hall
    State Floor
    tourists
    holidays
    This photograph of a group of tourists listening to the United States Marine Band play in the Entrance Hall during a candlelight tour was taken on December 27, 1973 by Joe McCary. First Lady Pat Nixon instituted special candlelight tours for the holidays and tours of the garden.
  • The Johnsons Greet AFS Event Attendees
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    South Lawn
    White House Guests
    This photograph by Joseph J. Scherschel shows shows the Johnson family greeting members of the American Field Service (AFS). Luci Johnson, at top center, is wearing solid yellow and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson can be seen at far left, with President Lyndon B. Johnson standing behind her. AFS is an international youth exchange organization. 3,000 AFS participants attended the July 20, 1965 speech given by President Johnson on the South Lawn before returning to their respective countries.
  • The Johnsons Arrive at AFS Event
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    South Grounds
    South Lawn
    event
    This photograph shows a crowd of 3,000 high school-age students on the White House South Lawn that recently completed a year-long study abroad program in the United States with the American Field Service (AFS) program. AFS is an international youth exchange organization. Here, AFS participants sit while President Lyndon B. Johnson, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson, and Luci Baines Johnson, their daughter, walk toward the gathered crowd.
  • Signing of the Voting Rights Act
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    Bill Signing
    U.S. Capitol
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    Bill Signing
    U.S. Capitol
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.