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  • Richard Yates Carte de Visite
    Bendann Bros.
    portrait
    Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum
    This is a carte de visite of Illinois Governor Richard Yates. Prior to his election as Illinois's 13th governor (1861-1865), Yates served in Congress. After the Civil War he represented Illinois in the United States Senate. As governor during the Civil War Yates oversaw the mobilization of Illinois volunteers for war service. (For more from Richard Yates please see 1118451 and 1118470.)
  • Alphonso Barto to William Barto, Alphonso Barto Papers (Part 1 of 3)
    Alphonso Barto
    letter
    Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum
    Civil War
    This is a letter of Lieutenant Alphonso Barto at Corinth, Mississippi to his father, William Barto of Illinois, dated February 9, 1863. Barto served in the U.S. Army, a member of the 52nd Illinois Infantry Regiment. He mustered in as a 2nd Lieutenant and was later promoted to Captain of Company K serving until the end of his enlistment in 1864. In the letter Barto expresses his support for the Emancipaton Proclamation as a measure that will hinder the South's war effort. He encloses resolutions his unit promoted in support of the proclamation (not found). (For more from the Alphonso Barto Papers, please see 1118456 and 1118508.)
  • Alphonso Barto to William Barto, Alphonso Barto Papers (Part 1 of 4)
    Alphonso Barto
    letter
    Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum
    Civil War
    This is a letter from Lieutenant Alphonso Barto at Corinth, Mississippi to his father, William Barto in Illinois, dated February 9, 1863. Barto served in the U.S. Army, a member of the 52nd Illinois Infantry Regiment. He was later promoted to Captain of Company K and served to the end of his enlistment in 1864. In the letter Barto describes how his thinking changed on emancipation during the course of the war. While maintaining a conservative view on race, Barto fully supported the Emancipation Proclamation. (For more from the Alphonso Barto Papers, please see 1118454 and 1118508.)
  • Alphonso Barto to William Barto, Alphonso Barto Papers (Part 3 of 3)
    Alphonso Barto
    letter
    Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum
    Civil War
    This is a letter of Lieutenant Alphonso Barto at Corinth, Mississippi to his father, William Barto of Illinois, dated February 9, 1863. Barto served in the U.S. Army, a member of the 52nd Illinois Infantry Regiment. He mustered in as a 2nd Lieutenant and was later promoted to Captain of Company K serving until the end of his enlistment in 1864. In the letter Barto expresses his support for the Emancipaton Proclamation as a measure that will hinder the South's war effort. He encloses resolutions his unit promoted in support of the proclamation (not found). (For more from the Alphonso Barto Papers, please see 1118456 and 1118508.)
  • Alphonso Barto to William Barto, Alphonso Barto Papers (Part 2 of 4)
    Alphonso Barto
    letter
    Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum
    Civil War
    This is a letter from Lieutenant Alphonso Barto at Corinth, Mississippi to his father, William Barto in Illinois, dated February 9, 1863. Barto served in the U.S. Army, a member of the 52nd Illinois Infantry Regiment. He was later promoted to Captain of Company K and served to the end of his enlistment in 1864. In the letter Barto describes how his thinking changed on emancipation during the course of the war. While maintaining a conservative view on race, Barto fully supported the Emancipation Proclamation. (For more from the Alphonso Barto Papers, please see 1118454 and 1118508.)
  • Alphonso Barto to William Barto, Alphonso Barto Papers (Part 3 of 4)
    Alphonso Barto
    letter
    Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum
    Civil War
    This is a letter from Lieutenant Alphonso Barto at Corinth, Mississippi to his father, William Barto in Illinois, dated February 9, 1863. Barto served in the U.S. Army, a member of the 52nd Illinois Infantry Regiment. He was later promoted to Captain of Company K and served to the end of his enlistment in 1864. In the letter Barto describes how his thinking changed on emancipation during the course of the war. While maintaining a conservative view on race, Barto fully supported the Emancipation Proclamation. (For more from the Alphonso Barto Papers, please see 1118454 and 1118508.)
  • Alphonso Barto to William Barto, Alphonso Barto Papers (Part 4 of 4)
    Alphonso Barto
    letter
    Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum
    Civil War
    This is a letter from Lieutenant Alphonso Barto at Corinth, Mississippi to his father, William Barto in Illinois, dated February 9, 1863. Barto served in the U.S. Army, a member of the 52nd Illinois Infantry Regiment. He was later promoted to Captain of Company K and served to the end of his enlistment in 1864. In the letter Barto describes how his thinking changed on emancipation during the course of the war. While maintaining a conservative view on race, Barto fully supported the Emancipation Proclamation. (For more from the Alphonso Barto Papers, please see 1118454 and 1118508.)
  • John C. Dinsmore to Jane Dinsmore, John C. Dinsmore Papers (Part 1 of 4)
    John C. Dinsmore
    letter
    Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum
    Civil War
    This is a letter from Captain John C. Dinsmore at Vicksburg, Mississippi, to his wife, Jane Dinsmore of Pike County, Illinois, dated June 8, 1863. Dinsmore served in the U.S. Army, Captain of Company E, 99th Illinois Infantry Regiment. He resigned his commission in 1864. In this letter Dinsmore explains to his wife that his regiment is very unhappy with the administration's war policy and those who voice opposition are considered "copperheads" by a small number of those in favor of the administration's decisions. (For a full pdf of this letter please see 1118455.)
  • John C. Dinsmore to Jane Dinsmore, John C. Dinsmore Papers (Part 2 of 4)
    John C. Dinsmore
    letter
    Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum
    Civil War
    This is a letter from Captain John C. Dinsmore at Vicksburg, Mississippi, to his wife, Jane Dinsmore of Pike County, Illinois, dated June 8, 1863. Dinsmore served in the U.S. Army, Captain of Company E, 99th Illinois Infantry Regiment. He resigned his commission in 1864. In this letter Dinsmore explains to his wife that his regiment is very unhappy with the administration's war policy and those who voice opposition are considered "copperheads" by a small number of those in favor of the administration's decisions. (For a full pdf of this letter please see 1118455.)
  • John C. Dinsmore to Jane Dinsmore, John C. Dinsmore Papers (Part 4 of 4)
    John C. Dinsmore
    letter
    Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum
    Civil War
    This is a letter from Captain John C. Dinsmore at Vicksburg, Mississippi, to his wife, Jane Dinsmore of Pike County, Illinois, dated June 8, 1863. Dinsmore served in the U.S. Army, Captain of Company E, 99th Illinois Infantry Regiment. He resigned his commission in 1864. In this letter Dinsmore explains to his wife that his regiment is very unhappy with the administration's war policy and those who voice opposition are considered "copperheads" by a small number of those in favor of the administration's decisions. (For a full pdf of this letter please see 1118455.)
  • John C. Dinsmore to Jane Dinsmore, John C. Dinsmore Papers (Part 3 of 4)
    John C. Dinsmore
    letter
    Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum
    Civil War
    This is a letter from Captain John C. Dinsmore at Vicksburg, Mississippi, to his wife, Jane Dinsmore of Pike County, Illinois, dated June 8, 1863. Dinsmore served in the U.S. Army, Captain of Company E, 99th Illinois Infantry Regiment. He resigned his commission in 1864. In this letter Dinsmore explains to his wife that his regiment is very unhappy with the administration's war policy and those who voice opposition are considered "copperheads" by a small number of those in favor of the administration's decisions. (For a full pdf of this letter please see 1118455.)
  • John C. Dinsmore to Jane Dinsmore, John C. Dinsmore Papers (Part 1 of 2)
    John C. Dinsmore
    Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum
    Civil War
    letter
    This is a letter of Captain John C. Dinsmore to his wife, Jane Dinsmore, of Pike County, Illinois, dated circa September 1862. Dinsmore served in the U.S. Army, Captain of Company E, 99th Illinois Infantry Regiment. He resigned his commission in 1864. In the letter Dinsmore relates how a friend reacted to the announcement of the Emancipation Proclamation and how, in spite of his own views on racial equality, he supported the proclamation as a war measure. (For a full pdf of this letter please see 1118458.)