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  • Holiday Card from President and Mrs. Johnson, 1968
    White House Calligraphy Office
    south view
    print
    holidays
    South Lawn
    Christmas
    Washington Monument
    Jefferson Memorial
    This is the illustrated side of a holiday card that was presented to White House Executive Chef Henry Haller from First Lady Lady Bird Johnson and President Lyndon B. Johnson in December 1968. The card features an illustration by Robert Laessig of the South Grounds as seen from the South Portico, with the Jefferson Monument and Washington Monument visible in the distance. The card includes a note from the presidential couple, declaring "appreciation" and "warmest wishes" for "all the years ahead." The Johnson's 1968 holiday card marked both the passing of the holiday season as well as the end of the Johnson administration, with the inauguration of President Richard M. Nixon the following month. To see the full card, see 1128399. This card is part of a personal collection belonging to Chef Haller. In the position, Haller served five first families and their distinguished guests from 1966-1987.
  • Holiday Card from President and Mrs. Johnson, 1967
    White House Calligraphy Office
    Christmas
    holidays
    Blue Room
    State Floor
    print
    This is the interior of a Christmas card that was presented to White House Executive Chef Henry Haller from First Lady Lady Bird Johnson and President Lyndon B. Johnson in December 1967. This was Haller's second Christmas at the White House, though he was to remain executive chef until 1987. The card features an illustration by Robert Laessig of the official White House Christmas tree, positioned in its traditional spot in the center of the Blue Room. The back of the card discusses the tradition of Christmas trees in the White House. To view the card in its entirety, see 1128401. This card is part of a personal collection belonging to Chef Haller. In the position, Haller served five first families and their distinguished guests from 1966-1987.
  • Holiday Card from President and Mrs. Johnson, 1966
    White House Calligraphy Office
    Christmas
    North Drive
    North Portico
    holidays
    north view
    print
    North Grounds
    This Christmas card was presented to White House Executive Chef Henry Haller from First Lady Lady Bird Johnson and President Lyndon B. Johnson in December 1966. This was Haller's first Christmas at the White House, though he was to remain as executive chef until 1987. The card features an illustration by Robert Laessig of the North Portico, festively decorated for the holidays. The opposite side of the card includes a description of the American Elm tree featured in the illustration, which was planted by President Woodrow Wilson in December 1913. To view the card in its entirety, see 1128398. This card is part of a personal collection belonging to Chef Haller. In the position, Haller served five first families and their distinguished guests from 1966-1987.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively, and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the portrait in August 1965 at the time of its acquisition into the White House Collection.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively, and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the portrait in August 1965 at the time of its acquisition into the White House Collection.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively, and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the portrait in August 1965 at the time of its acquisition into the White House Collection.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively, and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the portrait in August 1965 at the time of its acquisition into the White House Collection.
  • Lady Bird Johnson
    Elizabeth Shoumatoff
    official portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Lady Bird Johnson was painted by Elizabeth Shoumatoff. Mrs. Johnson graduated from the University of Texas with a degree in journalism. During her life prior to the White House, her business acumen meant she became the first First Lady to be a millionaire in her own right. As First Lady, she spearheaded beautification projects spanning cities and highways and initiated several firsts for her office. She was the first to have a press secretary and chief of staff, as well as the first to do a solo tour to campaign for major policy issues, such as the Civil Rights Act. Her husband, Lyndon Johnson, served as president from November 22, 1963 until January 20, 1969.
  • Lady Bird Johnson Watercolor Portrait
    Elizabeth Shoumatoff
    portrait
    This watercolor portrait of First Lady Lady Bird Johnson was created on paper by Elizabeth Shoumatoff in 1968. Shoumatoff, like many artists, used proof studies to map the color and composition of a painting before creating the final product.
  • Ronald Wilson Reagan
    Everett Raymond Kinstler
    official portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of President Ronald Reagan was painted by Everett Raymond Kinstler in 1991. Reagan served as governor of California from 1967-1975 and was president from January 20, 1981 until January 20, 1989. Kinstler began his career drawing comic books and illustrations for books and magazines before becoming a portraitist renowned for his paintings of famous entertainers, politicians, authors, and justices of the Supreme Court. Kinstler has painted portraits of Lady Bird Johnson, Betty Ford, Jimmy Carter, Richard M. Nixon, George H. W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush. His portraits of Reagan, seen here, and Gerald R. Ford, are official presidential portraits.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait.