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  • Mary Elizabeth Taylor
    Unknown
    portrait
    This photograph is of Mary Elizabeth "Betty" Taylor's portrait. She was the youngest daughter of President Zachary Taylor. Betty served as White House hostess in place of her mother, Margaret Mackall Smith Taylor, who was reluctant to go into society and plagued by ill health during her time as the first lady. At the time of her father's presidency, Betty was formally known as Mary Elizabeth Taylor Bliss but was later known as Mary Elizabeth Taylor Dandridge after the death of her first husband and her subsequent remarriage.
  • Jane Irwin Harrison
    Unknown
    portrait
    painting
    This portrait of Jane Irwin Harrison by an unknown artist was completed c. 1841–42. Jane Findlay Irwin Harrison served as the official White House hostess briefly in 1841, during father-in-law President William Henry Harrison’s administration. She had lived with her in-laws following the death of her husband, William Henry Harrison Jr., and accompanied the president-elect to Washington, D.C. There, she received glowing reviews for the two receptions that she hosted with the help of her aunt, Jane Irwin Findlay. Her time as de-facto first lady was cut short, however, when President Harrison died on April 4, 1841, after only a month in office. With flowers placed at each ear and a veil pulled back from her face, this portrait was probably made to celebrate Jane Harrison’s second marriage, to widower Lewis Whiteman, following her return to North Bend, Ohio. Just a few years later, she succumbed to tuberculosis at age 42.
  • Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison
    Unknown
    portrait
    painting
    This is a portrait of First Lady Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison, dressed in mourning was painted by an unknown artist, ca. 1820. Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison was married to President William Henry Harrison and was the grandmother of President Benjamin Harrison. Mrs. Harrison was 65 years old when her husband was elected president making her, at the time, the oldest woman to become first lady. When President Harrison was inaugurated in March of 1841, Mrs. Harrison remained in Ohio due to poor health. She had temporarily placed her widowed daughter-in-law Jane Irwin Harrison in charge of being the hostess. Mrs. Harrison did not recover in time to reside in the White House before President Harrison passed away a month after his inauguration.
  • The Great Seal of California, Decatur House
    Unknown
    Decatur House
    California
    Washington, D.C.
    This parquet flooring and wood representation of the great seal of California was installed in the Decatur House dining room between 1872 and 1874. It was part of several changes Edward Fitzgerald Beale and his wife, Mary Edwards Beale instituted after they purchased the property in 1871. The Beales were the last family to own Decatur House. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. It was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur (1779-1820) and his wife, Susan Wheeler Decatur. Tragically, on March 22, 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel. After his death, his widow Susan Decatur rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into a co-stewardship arrangement of Decatur House.
  • Presentation Sword, Decatur House Collection
    William Rose
    Unknown
    furnishings
    swords
    Decatur House
    This sword was presented to Commodore Stephen Decatur by the Commonwealth of Virginia following his capture of the Macedonia on October 25, 1812. The blade was created in Philadelphia by William Rose and features an ivory and parcel-gilt hilt topped with a cast eagle, silver gilt plate, and brass stripes on the edges, and inlaid with gold foliage and silver lettering. An inscription on the blade reads, “In testimony of the splendid naval talents and valor displayed by Commodore Stephen Decatur commanding the United States Frigate UNITED STATES in the capture of the English Frigate MACEDONIA 25th, October 1812.” This presentation sword is part of the collection at Decatur House. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and Decatur House now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Sewing Table, Decatur House Collection
    Unknown
    furniture
    furnishings
    tables
    Decatur House
    This sewing table is made of wood and coated with between three and fifteen layers of fine black and gold lacquer. The sewing table was made in the early 19th century and is believed to have been an engagement gift from Stephen Decatur to his fiancée — a “Miss. King.” The King family passed the table down from generation to generation despite the couple not marrying. Stephen Decatur would go on to marry Susan Wheeler. The sewing table was made in China for the American market and originally had a silk bag attached to it, which was replaced with a mauve damask fabric in the 20th century. This table is a part of Decatur House Collection. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and Decatur House now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Presentation Sword and Scabbard, Decatur House Collection
    William Rose
    Unknown
    furnishings
    swords
    Decatur House
    This sword and scabbard was presented to Commodore Stephen Decatur by the Commonwealth of Virginia following his capture of the Macedonia on October 25, 1812. The blade was created in Philadelphia by William Rose and features an ivory and parcel-gilt hilt topped with a cast eagle, silver gilt plate, and brass stripes on the edges, and inlaid with gold foliage and silver lettering. An inscription on the blade reads, “In testimony of the splendid naval talents and valor displayed by Commodore Stephen Decatur commanding the United States Frigate UNITED STATES in the capture of the English Frigate MACEDONIA 25th, October 1812.” The scabbard is made of gilt silver with cast-applied nautical decorations. This presentation sword and scabbard are a part of the collection at Decatur House. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and Decatur House now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Convex Girandole Mirror, Green Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This convex girandole mirror with wall sconces was made circa 1820 in New York. The wooden frame features carvings of a large American eagle at the top and a smaller British lion at the base. The wood has been gilded with two candle sconces on either end of the base. The creator is unknown. The girandole is captured in the Green Room in a photograph taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. It was added to the White House Collection in 1971.
  • Convex Girandole Mirror, Green Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This convex girandole mirror with wall sconces was made circa 1820 in New York. The wooden frame features carvings of a large American eagle at the top and a smaller British lion at the base. The wood has been gilded with two candle sconces on either end of the base. The creator is unknown. The girandole is captured in the Green Room in a photograph taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. It was added to the White House Collection in 1971.
  • Convex Girandole Mirror, Green Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This convex girandole mirror with wall sconces was made circa 1820 in New York. The wooden frame features carvings of a large American eagle at the top and a smaller British lion at the base. The wood has been gilded with two candle sconces on either end of the base. The creator is unknown. The girandole is captured in the Green Room in a photograph taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. It was added to the White House Collection in 1971.
  • Convex Girandole Mirror, Green Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This convex girandole mirror with wall sconces was made circa 1820 in New York. The wooden frame features carvings of a large American eagle at the top and a smaller British lion at the base. The wood has been gilded with two candle sconces on either end of the base. The creator is unknown. The girandole is captured in the Green Room in a photograph taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. It was added to the White House Collection in 1971.
  • Convex Girandole Mirror, Green Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This convex girandole mirror with wall sconces was made circa 1820 in New York. The wooden frame features carvings of a large American eagle at the top and a smaller British lion at the base. The wood has been gilded with two candle sconces on either end of the base. The creator is unknown. The girandole is captured in the Green Room in a photograph taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. It was added to the White House Collection in 1971.
  • Convex Girandole Mirror, Green Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This convex girandole mirror with wall sconces was made circa 1820 in New York. The wooden frame features carvings of a large American eagle at the top and a smaller British lion at the base. The wood has been gilded with two candle sconces on either end of the base. The creator is unknown. The girandole is captured in the Green Room in a photograph taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. It was added to the White House Collection in 1971.
  • Federal Period Mirror, White House Collection
    Unknown
    mirror
    Family Dining Room
    State Floor
    This 19th century mirror was donated to the White House Collection in 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration. The convex gilt mirror was made in the Federal style and features a carved bald eagle above the mirror glass. The piece was likely made in New York. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the mirror in August 1965 in the Family Dining Room, seen reflected in the mirror. At the time, the mirror hung above the room's green and white marble mantelpiece.
  • Federal Period Mirror, White House Collection
    Unknown
    mirror
    Family Dining Room
    State Floor
    This 19th century mirror was donated to the White House Collection in 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration. The convex gilt mirror was made in the Federal style and features a carved bald eagle above the mirror glass. The piece was likely made in New York. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the mirror in August 1965 in the Family Dining Room, seen reflected in the mirror. At the time, the mirror hung above the room's green and white marble mantelpiece.
  • Convex Mirror, Red Room
    Unknown
    Red Room
    mirror
    State Floor
    This convex mirror, made in the early 19th century, remains a part of the White House furnishings. In this photograph, the mirror is hanging in the Red Room and reflects the furnishings and fireplace in the ornate room during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Mirror, Red Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Red Room
    mirror
    This photograph of a circular mirror with a decorative eagle in the Red Room was shot in such a way that a reflection of the room's furnishings are displayed. The photograph was taken by George Mobley of the National Geographic Service.
  • Wine Bottle Holder, White House Collection
    Unknown
    silver
    This silver-plated wine bottle holder was created circa 1904 in Connecticut. The wine bottle holder was used by White House staff to serve guests at dinners hosted by the president and first lady. Suz Redfearn photographed the wine bottle holder on November 19, 2018.
  • Mantel Clock, White House Collection (Detail)
    Unknown
    clock
    This detailed closeup is of a black marble and malachite mantel clock. The clock has three dials (clock, calendar, and barometer) and a thermometer and was made in France. It was purchased from retailer Browne & Spaulding of New York City for the mantelpiece in the Cabinet Room during the Ulysses S. Grant administration. Until the construction of the West Wing in 1902, the Cabinet Room was on the east end of the Second Floor in the Executive Mansion.
  • Wine Bottle Holder, White House Collection
    Unknown
    silver
    This silver-plated wine bottle holder was created circa 1904 in Connecticut. The wine bottle holder was used by White House staff to serve guests at dinners hosted by the president and first lady. Suz Redfearn photographed the wine bottle holder on November 19, 2018.
  • Mantel Clock, White House Collection (Detail)
    Unknown
    clock
    This detailed closeup is of a black marble and malachite mantel clock. The clock has three dials (clock, calendar, and barometer) and a thermometer and was made in France. It was purchased from retailer Browne & Spaulding of New York City for the mantelpiece in the Cabinet Room during the Ulysses S. Grant administration. Until the construction of the West Wing in 1902, the Cabinet Room was on the east end of the Second Floor in the Executive Mansion.
  • Flagpole Finial, White House Collection
    Unknown
    finial
    This gilded copper finial with an intricately carved eagle ornament was removed from the White House flagpole in 1993 due to damage. It is not known if this was the original finial installed atop a new White House flagpole in 1898 or if it was a replacement. Following the removal in 1993, the finial was replaced with an exact replica.
  • Wine Bottle Holder, White House Collection (Detail)
    Unknown
    silver
    This silver-plated wine bottle holder was created circa 1904 in Connecticut. The wine bottle holder was used by White House staff to serve guests at dinners hosted by the president and first lady. Suz Redfearn photographed the wine bottle holder on November 19, 2018.
  • Medicine Chest
    Unknown
    chest
    This walnut medicine chest with brass and ivory details was taken from the White House during the fire of August 24, 1814 and given to President Franklin D. Roosevelt by a descendant of Thomas Kains, a British naval purser who was part of the British forces in the Chesapeake campaign. Bates Littlehales photographed the chest in March 1962, when it was on loan from the National Archives and Records Administration during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Torchere, White House Collection
    Unknown
    candelabrum
    gilded bronze
    This is one of a pair of circa 1830-1837 gilded bronze torchères in the White House Collection. They were placed with the Blue Room mantel in the mid-19th century and may have been a gift to President Andrew Jackson by a political supporter. Bates Littlehales photographed the torchere in March 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.