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  • Side Chair Attributed to Duncan Phyfe
    Duncan Phyfe
    chair
    This armchair is attributed to Duncan Phyfe of New York. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports.
  • Mahogany and Tulip Poplar Armchair
    Duncan Phyfe
    chair
    This mahogany and tulip poplar chair by Duncan Phyfe of New York was based on earlier English designs and has double-crossed banister backs. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports.
  • Tapered Work Table
    Duncan Phyfe
    table
    This tapered form work table is one of only four known nearly identical tables (a second is also present in the White House). Here it is shown with all its drawers and compartments open. Its form and complexity attribute the work to Duncan Phyfe of New York. This desk was made for a variety of tasks including: writing, sewing, or miniature painting. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports. The table was a gift of the Richard King Mellon Foundation to the White House in 1971.
  • Grecian Style Pier Table
    Duncan Phyfe
    table
    This early Grecian style pier table by the renowned Duncan Phyfe is made of mahogany, marble, and mirrored glass. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports. This pier table was part of a large quantity of furniture purchased from Phyfe by New Yorker Benjamin Clark. The White House purchased the table from one of Clark’s descendants in 1961.
  • Scrolled-Back Settee Sofa
    Duncan Phyfe
    sofa
    This sofa is one of a pair of scrolled-back settees by Duncan Phyfe. It has a caned seat and back, and tablets carved with the neoclassical motifs often found on Phyfe's furniture. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports.
  • Mahogany Desk and Bookcase
    Duncan Phyfe
    desk
    bookcase
    This mahogany desk and bookcase was built between 1815 and 1820 and is attributed to Duncan Phyfe of New York. The gothic arched mullions and the cylinder front with fold-out writing surface are characteristic of Phyfe's furniture. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports.
  • Tapered Work Table (Closed)
    Duncan Phyfe
    table
    This tapered form work table is one of only four known nearly identical tables (a second is also present in the White House). It's form and complexity attribute the work to Duncan Phyfe of New York. This desk was made for a variety of tasks including: writing, sewing, or miniature painting. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports. The table was a gift of the Richard King Mellon Foundation to the White House in 1971.
  • Phyfe Easy Chair (View 2 of 3)
    Duncan Phyfe
    chair
    Duncan Phyfe of New York produced this easy chair that was acquired by the White House in 1971 for the Green Room. Historically, the upholstery has been in varying shades of coral, pink, and red. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports.
  • Phyfe Easy Chair (View 3 of 3)
    Duncan Phyfe
    chair
    Duncan Phyfe of New York produced this easy chair that was acquired by the White House in 1971 for the Green Room. Historically, the upholstery has been in varying shades of coral, pink, and red. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports.
  • Phyfe Easy Chair (View 1 of 3)
    Duncan Phyfe
    chair
    Duncan Phyfe of New York produced this easy chair that was acquired by the White House in 1971 for the Green Room. Historically, the upholstery has been in varying shades of coral, pink, and red. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports.
  • Scrolled-Back Caned Settee, White House Collection
    Duncan Phyfe
    sofa
    This sofa is one of a pair of scrolled-back settees by Duncan Phyfe. It has a caned seat and back with tablets carved with the neoclassical motifs often found on Phyfe's furniture. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern states and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports. Bates Littlehales photographed the settee in March 1962, during the John F. Kennedy administration. Please refer to 887 for an updated image with upholstery.
  • Scrolled-Back Caned Settee, White House Collection
    Duncan Phyfe
    sofa
    This sofa is one of a pair of scrolled-back settees by Duncan Phyfe. It has a caned seat and back with tablets carved with the neoclassical motifs often found on Phyfe's furniture. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern states and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports. Bates Littlehales photographed the settee in March 1962, during the John F. Kennedy administration. Please refer to 887 for an updated image with upholstery.
  • Scrolled-Back Caned Settee, White House Collection
    Duncan Phyfe
    sofa
    This sofa is one of a pair of scrolled-back settees by Duncan Phyfe. It has a caned seat and back with tablets carved with the neoclassical motifs often found on Phyfe's furniture. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern states and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports. Bates Littlehales photographed the settee in March 1962, during the John F. Kennedy administration. Please refer to 887 for an updated image with upholstery.
  • Scrolled-Back Caned Settee, White House Collection
    Duncan Phyfe
    sofa
    This sofa is one of a pair of scrolled-back settees by Duncan Phyfe. It has a caned seat and back with tablets carved with the neoclassical motifs often found on Phyfe's furniture. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern states and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports. Bates Littlehales photographed the settee in March 1962, during the John F. Kennedy administration. Please refer to 887 for an updated image with upholstery.
  • Scrolled-Back Caned Settee, White House Collection
    Duncan Phyfe
    sofa
    This sofa is one of a pair of scrolled-back settees by Duncan Phyfe. It has a caned seat and back with tablets carved with the neoclassical motifs often found on Phyfe's furniture. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern states and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports. Bates Littlehales photographed the settee in March 1962, during the John F. Kennedy administration. Please refer to 887 for an updated image with upholstery.