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  • Top of a Gilded Brass and Marble Guéridon Table, White House Collection
    Charles Honoré Lannuier
    tables
    furniture
    This is the intricately designed trompe-l’oeil marble top of a guéridon, or small table, made by Charles Honoré Lannuier circa 1810. This guéridon (small, circular French table) is made of mahogany, satinwood, rosewood, and possibly sycamore veneers, with gilded brass and marble. The table, a part of the White House Collection, also features an intricate Italian marble top and is considered a Lannuier masterpiece.
  • Rosewood Center Table with Carved Apron, White House Collection
    John Henry Belter
    table
    This rosewood center table is attributed to John Henry Belter of New York. First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln purchased it in 1861 for a guest room. The apron is decorated in carved vines, grape clusters, and roses, and the legs are exotic birds. Bates Littlehales photographed the table in March 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Rosewood Center Table with Carved Apron, White House Collection
    John Henry Belter
    table
    This rosewood center table is attributed to John Henry Belter of New York. First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln purchased it in 1861 for a guest room. The apron is decorated in carved vines, grape clusters, and roses, and the legs are exotic birds. Bates Littlehales photographed the table in March 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Red Room Herter Brothers Armchair (Detail)
    Herter Brothers
    chair
    This is a detail photograph of the Herter Brothers chair First Lady Julia Grant purchased for the Red Room. This is the surviving half of a pair of gilded lady's chairs made by Herter Brothers. The arm rests terminate in carved lion's heads, a motif that appears in other Herter pieces, 11 of which were also made for the Red Room. In 1873-1875, the Grants supervised a major redecoration of the White House in preparation for their daughter Nellie’s wedding to Englishman Algernon Sartoris. Throughout the staterooms, Herter Brothers, a renowned New York furniture maker, supplied sophisticated furnishings.
  • Light Standard
    Edward F. Caldwell &Co.
    light standard
    candelabrum
    This gilded metal and glass light standard was modeled after a French Empire candelabrum with Egyptian motifs on the base. Several were made for the East Room in 1902 where they remain.
  • Treaty Table
    Pottier & Stymus Manufacturing Co.
    table
    This walnut conference table by Pottier & Stymus Manufacturing Co. of New York has eight locking drawers, one for each member of the Cabinet in 1869. Several international treaties and agreements were signed on this table.
  • Armchair and Side Chair
    L. Marcotte & Co.
    chair
    This gilded cherry armchair and painted birch side chair were copied from a French Empire suite in the Chateau de Compiegne outside Paris. They were commissioned from L. Marcotte and Co. of New York, a decorating firm that executed all of the interior decoration of the Blue Room in 1902.
  • Side Chair Attributed to Duncan Phyfe
    Duncan Phyfe
    chair
    This armchair is attributed to Duncan Phyfe of New York. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports.
  • Chandelier, East Room
    Christoph Palme & Co.
    chandelier
    This cut glass and gilded brass chandelier was made by Christoph Palme & Co. of Parchen, Bohemia (Austria-Hungary) for Edward F. Caldwell & Co. of New York, which was a prominent lighting design firm that supplied electric lighting fixtures to the White House in 1902. This one was one of three purchased for the East Room, which were later shortened and modified in 1952. Each chandelier consists of 6,000 pieces of glass and weighs about 1,200 pounds.
  • Carved and Gilded Crest of an Overmantel Mirror Frame
    L. R. Menger
    mirror
    This overmantel mirror frame by L.R. Menger of New York is gilded gesso on wood and is one of two originally made for the Green Room. In this photograph, the mirror is seen in the Treaty Room, located on the Second Floor residence of the Executive Mansion. It was acquired in 1853 during the Franklin Pierce administration.
  • Candelabrum, Hayes Administration State Dining Room
    Tiffany and Company
    candelabrum
    This is one of a pair of gilded brass candelabra that First Lady Lucy Hayes chose from Tiffany and Company for the State Dining Room in 1880. The candelabrum historically remain in the State Dining Room.
  • Rosewood Center Table (Detail)
    Herter Brothers
    table
    This detail view is of a rosewood center table with marquetry inlays of satinwood, holly, and boxwood which was made by Herter Brothers of New York. There are carved lion heads on the legs. First Lady Julia Grant commissioned Herter Brothers to redecorate the Red Room in 1875.
  • Maple Side Chair
    Unknown
    chair
    This maple side chair made to imitate bamboo is part of two sets of furnishings made for the White House bedrooms in 1870s. This style of furniture became popular in America following Commodore Matthew Perry's return from Japan in 1855.
  • Rosewood Center Table with Carved Apron, White House Collection
    John Henry Belter
    table
    This rosewood center table is attributed to John Henry Belter of New York. First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln purchased it in 1861 for a guest room. The apron is decorated in carved vines, grape clusters, and roses, and the legs are exotic birds.
  • Bracket Clock
    Thomas Pearsall
    clock
    This mahogany bracket clock attributed to Thomas Pearsall and Effingham Embree of New York has a brass spring-driven movement and an American eagle on the dial. The bracket clock is an English form and in most cases exported to America, though a limited number were made domestically. The clock was a gift of the White House Historical Association to the White House in 1974.
  • Gilded Cherry Banquette
    L. Marcotte & Co.
    bench
    This gilded cherry banquette in the Louis XVI Revival style by L. Marcotte & Co. of New York is part of a 13-piece suite purchased for the East Room in 1902. Marcotte also made window cornices and console tables in this style for the East Room.
  • Mahogany and Tulip Poplar Armchair
    Duncan Phyfe
    chair
    This mahogany and tulip poplar chair by Duncan Phyfe of New York was based on earlier English designs and has double-crossed banister backs. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports.
  • Side Chair, Cabinet Room
    J. & J. W. Meeks
    chair
    This Gothic Revival black walnut side chair by J. and J.W. Meeks of New York was one of 24 made for the Cabinet Room and used there from 1847-1869. These chairs appear in prints of Lincoln's Cabinet Room and came to be identified with him. Until the construction of the West Wing in 1902, the Cabinet Room was on the east end of the second floor of the Executive Mansion.
  • Tapered Work Table
    Duncan Phyfe
    table
    This tapered form work table is one of only four known nearly identical tables (a second is also present in the White House). Here it is shown with all its drawers and compartments open. Its form and complexity attribute the work to Duncan Phyfe of New York. This desk was made for a variety of tasks including: writing, sewing, or miniature painting. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports. The table was a gift of the Richard King Mellon Foundation to the White House in 1971.
  • Tall Case Clock
    Effingham Embree
    clock
    This tall case clock with musical works done in the Federal style was manufactured by Effingham Embree of New York. This is a supplemental piece added to the Diplomatic Reception Room following the donation of Federal furniture accepted by First Lady Mamie Eisenhower in 1960 for that room.
  • Rosewood Side Chair for State Dining room
    Charles A. Baudine
    chair
    This rosewood side chair is one of 42 purple velvet covered rosewood chairs by Charles A. Baudine of New York commissioned by First Lady Sarah Polk for the State Dining Room. Mrs. Polk also installed matching purple-and-gold draperies.
  • Mahogany Mixing Table with Green Marble Top
    Charles Honoré Lannuier
    table
    This small mahogany table by Charles Honoré Lannuier has waterleaf carved balusters and an inset green marble top. It represents the height of New York neoclassical taste. The table was acquired for the White House by the White House Historical Association in 1973.
  • Grecian Style Pier Table
    Duncan Phyfe
    table
    This early Grecian style pier table by the renowned Duncan Phyfe is made of mahogany, marble, and mirrored glass. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports. This pier table was part of a large quantity of furniture purchased from Phyfe by New Yorker Benjamin Clark. The White House purchased the table from one of Clark’s descendants in 1961.
  • Scrolled-Back Settee Sofa
    Duncan Phyfe
    sofa
    This sofa is one of a pair of scrolled-back settees by Duncan Phyfe. It has a caned seat and back, and tablets carved with the neoclassical motifs often found on Phyfe's furniture. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports.
  • Gilded Brass and Marble Guéridon Table, White House Collection
    Charles Honoré Lannuier
    table
    This guéridon (small, circular French table) is made of mahogany, satinwood, rosewood, and possibly sycamore veneers, gilded brass, and marble. This table has an intricate Italian marble top and is considered a Charles Honoré Lannuier masterpiece. The photograph was taken by Bates Littlehales of the National Geographic Service.