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  • Barack Obama
    Robert McCurdy
    official portrait
    This official portrait of President Barack Obama was painted by Robert McCurdy in 2018. Prior to his election to the presidency, Obama served as a United States senator from Illinois. On January 20, 2009, he became the first African American president and served two terms from 2009 to 2017. Both portraits of President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama were unveiled in a ceremony in the East Room of the White House on September 7, 2022.
  • Michelle Obama
    Sharon Sprung
    official portrait
    This official portrait of First Lady Michelle Obama was painted by Sharon Sprung in 2018. A Chicago native, Obama earned degrees from Princeton University and Harvard Law School. Her husband, Barack Obama, served as president from January 20, 2009 until January 20, 2017. As first lady, Michelle Obama pursued initiatives focused on childhood obesity and healthy eating, support for service members and their families, and opportunity in education. Both portraits of President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama were unveiled in a ceremony in the East Room of the White House on September 7, 2022.
  • Mary Elizabeth Taylor
    Unknown
    portrait
    This photograph is of Mary Elizabeth "Betty" Taylor's portrait. She was the youngest daughter of President Zachary Taylor. Betty served as White House hostess in place of her mother, Margaret Mackall Smith Taylor, who was reluctant to go into society and plagued by ill health during her time as the first lady. At the time of her father's presidency, Betty was formally known as Mary Elizabeth Taylor Bliss but was later known as Mary Elizabeth Taylor Dandridge after the death of her first husband and her subsequent remarriage.
  • Jane Irwin Harrison
    Unknown
    portrait
    painting
    This portrait of Jane Irwin Harrison by an unknown artist was completed c. 1841–42. Jane Findlay Irwin Harrison served as the official White House hostess briefly in 1841, during father-in-law President William Henry Harrison’s administration. She had lived with her in-laws following the death of her husband, William Henry Harrison Jr., and accompanied the president-elect to Washington, D.C. There, she received glowing reviews for the two receptions that she hosted with the help of her aunt, Jane Irwin Findlay. Her time as de-facto first lady was cut short, however, when President Harrison died on April 4, 1841, after only a month in office. With flowers placed at each ear and a veil pulled back from her face, this portrait was probably made to celebrate Jane Harrison’s second marriage, to widower Lewis Whiteman, following her return to North Bend, Ohio. Just a few years later, she succumbed to tuberculosis at age 42.
  • Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison
    Unknown
    portrait
    painting
    This is a portrait of First Lady Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison, dressed in mourning was painted by an unknown artist, ca. 1820. Anna Tuthill Symmes Harrison was married to President William Henry Harrison and was the grandmother of President Benjamin Harrison. Mrs. Harrison was 65 years old when her husband was elected president making her, at the time, the oldest woman to become first lady. When President Harrison was inaugurated in March of 1841, Mrs. Harrison remained in Ohio due to poor health. She had temporarily placed her widowed daughter-in-law Jane Irwin Harrison in charge of being the hostess. Mrs. Harrison did not recover in time to reside in the White House before President Harrison passed away a month after his inauguration.
  • Maison du Commodore Stephen Decatur, Washington, June 1822
    E. Vaile
    Washington, D.C.
    Decatur House
    painting
    This painting of Decaur House was created by E. Vaile in June 1822. A man stands at the door, as a carriage approaches. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Kakemono Panel: A Pheasant in Flowering Branches
    Utagawa Kunitsuru
    painting
    Decatur House
    textiles
    This is a kakemono panel (also known as a vertical hanging scroll) containing either text or a painting, intended to be viewed on a wall and rolled when not in use. It was created in 1872 by the artist Utagawa Kunitsuru and depicts a pheasant among flowering branches. This is one of a set of six paintings displayed in the dining room of Decatur House and remain a part of the Decatur House Collection. After nearly 150 years, they began to deteriorate, but with funding provided by the Sumitomo Foundation, they were conserved to their original state.
  • Kakemono Panel: Woman Holding a Parasol
    Utagawa Kunitsuru
    painting
    Decatur House
    textiles
    This is a kakemono panel (also known as a vertical hanging scroll) containing either text or a painting, intended to be viewed on a wall and rolled when not in use. It was created in 1872 by the artist Utagawa Kunitsuru and depicts a woman holding a parasol during a gentle snowfall. This is one of a set of six paintings displayed in the dining room of Decatur House and remain a part of the Decatur House Collection. After nearly 150 years, they began to deteriorate, but with funding provided by the Sumitomo Foundation, they were conserved to their original state.
  • Kakemono Panel: Woman With A Shamisen
    Utagawa Kunitsuru
    painting
    Decatur House
    textiles
    This is a kakemono panel (also known as a vertical hanging scroll) containing either text or a painting, intended to be viewed on a wall and rolled when not in use. It was created in 1872 by the artist Utagawa Kunitsuru and depicts a woman holding the three-stringed instrument or shamisen. This is one of a set of six paintings displayed in the dining room of Decatur House and remain a part of the Decatur House Collection. After nearly 150 years, they began to deteriorate, but with funding provided by the Sumitomo Foundation, they were conserved to their original state.
  • Kakemono Panel: A Pair of Cranes Under A Crabapple Tree
    Utagawa Kunitsuru
    painting
    Decatur House
    textiles
    This is a kakemono panel (also known as a vertical hanging scroll) containing either text or a painting, intended to be viewed on a wall and rolled when not in use. It was created in 1872 by the artist Utagawa Kunitsuru and depicts two cranes beneath a crabapple tree. This is one of a set of six paintings displayed in the dining room of Decatur House and remain a part of the Decatur House Collection. After nearly 150 years, they began to deteriorate, but with funding provided by the Sumitomo Foundation, they were conserved to their original state.
  • Kakemono Panel: Woman in A Snowstorm
    Utagawa Kunitsuru
    painting
    Decatur House
    textiles
    This is a kakemono panel (also known as a vertical hanging scroll) containing either text or a painting, intended to be viewed on a wall and rolled when not in use. It was created in 1872 by the artist Utagawa Kunitsuru and depicts a woman braving a snowstorm. This is one of a set of six paintings displayed in the dining room of Decatur House and remain a part of the Decatur House Collection. After nearly 150 years, they began to deteriorate, but with funding provided by the Sumitomo Foundation, they were conserved to their original state.
  • Kakemono Panels: Man With Swords
    Utagawa Kunitsuru
    painting
    Decatur House
    textiles
    This is a kakemono panel (also known as a vertical hanging scroll) containing either text or a painting, intended to be viewed on a wall and rolled when not in use. It was created in 1872 by the artist Utagawa Kunitsuru and depicts a man with swords near a flowering tree. This is one of a set of six paintings displayed in the dining room of Decatur House and remain a part of the Decatur House Collection. After nearly 150 years, they began to deteriorate, but with funding provided by the Sumitomo Foundation, they were conserved to their original state.
  • The Great Seal of California, Decatur House
    Unknown
    Decatur House
    California
    Washington, D.C.
    This parquet flooring and wood representation of the great seal of California was installed in the Decatur House dining room between 1872 and 1874. It was part of several changes Edward Fitzgerald Beale and his wife, Mary Edwards Beale instituted after they purchased the property in 1871. The Beales were the last family to own Decatur House. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. It was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur (1779-1820) and his wife, Susan Wheeler Decatur. Tragically, on March 22, 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel. After his death, his widow Susan Decatur rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into a co-stewardship arrangement of Decatur House.
  • Horses Quenching Their Thirst, Camels Disdaining, Decatur House Collection
    Ernest E. de F. Narjot
    painting
    Decatur House
    This oil on canvas painting of the U.S. Camel Corps was completed by Ernest E. de F. Narjot in 1867. The painting depicts horses drinking eagerly with camels in the background. The painting highlights the usefulness of camels as back animals in the American southwest during military operations and had been championed by Gen. Edward Beale. Beale was a western adventurer naval officer, explorer, frontiersman, superintendent of Indian affairs, California rancher, and later a diplomat. Beale would help form the U.S. Camel Corp and the experiment lasted from 1856-1866. This painting commemorates the corps and is part of the Decatur House Collection. The Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was completed in 1818. It was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. It was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur (1779-1820) and his wife, Susan Wheeler Decatur. Tragically, on March 22, 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel. After his death, his widow Susan Decatur rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into a co-stewardship arrangement of Decatur House.
  • Study for the Portrait of President Millard Fillmore
    G. P. A. Healy
    portrait
    This charcoal and chalk on paper study of President Millard Fillmore's was created by George Peter Alexander Healy, sometimes known as G. P. A. Healy, on December 12, 1857. Healy used this study for the official portrait of President Fillmore in the White House Collection. Healy was one of the most popular and prolific portraitists of the mid-19th century. Fillmore had served in the House of Representatives and was vice president when President Zachary Taylor died suddenly while in office in 1850. Fillmore served as president from July 9, 1850 until March 4, 1853.
  • Theodore Roosevelt
    Tadé Styka
    portrait
    This painting of Theodore Roosevelt was painted by Polish artist Tadé Styka circa 1909. Styka depicts Roosevelt during his time with the Rough Riders, a volunteer cavalry unit that Roosevelt led during the Spanish-American War. The painting later hung in the Roosevelt Room of the White House. A former governor of New York, Roosevelt became president upon the assassination of William McKinley, on September 14, 1901 and served until March 4, 1909. This painting was acquired for the White House Collection by the White House Historical Association in 1974.
  • Theodore Roosevelt
    Tadé Styka
    portrait
    This painting of Theodore Roosevelt was painted by Polish artist Tadé Styka circa 1909. Styka depicts Roosevelt during his time with the Rough Riders, a volunteer cavalry unit that Roosevelt led during the Spanish-American War. The painting later hung in the Roosevelt Room of the White House. A former governor of New York, Roosevelt became president upon the assassination of William McKinley, on September 14, 1901 and served until March 4, 1909. This painting was acquired for the White House Collection by the White House Historical Association in 1974.
  • Andrew Jackson
    Samuel M. Charles
    portrait
    This watercolor on ivory portrait of President Andrew Jackson was completed by Samuel M. Charles in 1835. The portrait is signed and dated to the right, reading, "Painted by S M. Charles 1835." Jackson was president from March 4, 1829 until March 4, 1837. Prior to his election, President Jackson served in the United States House of Representatives and United States Senate for the state of Tennessee and was a major general during the War of 1812. Bates Littlehales photographed this portrait in March 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Andrew Jackson
    Samuel M. Charles
    portrait
    This watercolor on ivory portrait of President Andrew Jackson was completed by Samuel M. Charles in 1835. The portrait is signed and dated to the right, reading, "Painted by S M. Charles 1835." Jackson was president from March 4, 1829 until March 4, 1837. Prior to his election, President Jackson served in the United States House of Representatives and United States Senate for the state of Tennessee and was a major general during the War of 1812. Bates Littlehales photographed this portrait in March 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Andrew Jackson
    Samuel M. Charles
    portrait
    This watercolor on ivory portrait of President Andrew Jackson was completed by Samuel M. Charles in 1835. The portrait is signed and dated to the right, reading, "Painted by S M. Charles 1835." Jackson was president from March 4, 1829 until March 4, 1837. Prior to his election, President Jackson served in the United States House of Representatives and United States Senate for the state of Tennessee and was a major general during the War of 1812. Bates Littlehales photographed this portrait in March 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively, and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the portrait in August 1965 at the time of its acquisition into the White House Collection.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively, and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the portrait in August 1965 at the time of its acquisition into the White House Collection.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively, and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the portrait in August 1965 at the time of its acquisition into the White House Collection.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively, and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the portrait in August 1965 at the time of its acquisition into the White House Collection.
  • George Washington
    Giuseppe Ceracchi
    busts
    likeness
    sculpture
    This marble bust of President George Washington is by Italian sculptor Giuseppe Ceracchi. Ceracchi sculpted many notable Americans, including Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton. This bust was modeled circa 1790-1794 and was carved circa 1815. The United States government acquired the bust along with busts of Amerigo Vespucci and Christopher Columbus during the James Monroe administration in 1817. Washington served as the commander in chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolution. He served as president from April 30, 1789 until March 4, 1797. Bates Littlehales photographed the bust in March 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.