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  • Holiday Card from President and Mrs. Johnson, 1968
    White House Calligraphy Office
    south view
    print
    holidays
    South Lawn
    Christmas
    Washington Monument
    Jefferson Memorial
    This is the illustrated side of a holiday card that was presented to White House Executive Chef Henry Haller from First Lady Lady Bird Johnson and President Lyndon B. Johnson in December 1968. The card features an illustration by Robert Laessig of the South Grounds as seen from the South Portico, with the Jefferson Monument and Washington Monument visible in the distance. The card includes a note from the presidential couple, declaring "appreciation" and "warmest wishes" for "all the years ahead." The Johnson's 1968 holiday card marked both the passing of the holiday season as well as the end of the Johnson administration, with the inauguration of President Richard M. Nixon the following month. To see the full card, see 1128399. This card is part of a personal collection belonging to Chef Haller. In the position, Haller served five first families and their distinguished guests from 1966-1987.
  • Holiday Card from President and Mrs. Johnson, 1967
    White House Calligraphy Office
    Christmas
    holidays
    Blue Room
    State Floor
    print
    This is the interior of a Christmas card that was presented to White House Executive Chef Henry Haller from First Lady Lady Bird Johnson and President Lyndon B. Johnson in December 1967. This was Haller's second Christmas at the White House, though he was to remain executive chef until 1987. The card features an illustration by Robert Laessig of the official White House Christmas tree, positioned in its traditional spot in the center of the Blue Room. The back of the card discusses the tradition of Christmas trees in the White House. To view the card in its entirety, see 1128401. This card is part of a personal collection belonging to Chef Haller. In the position, Haller served five first families and their distinguished guests from 1966-1987.
  • Holiday Card from President and Mrs. Johnson, 1966
    White House Calligraphy Office
    Christmas
    North Drive
    North Portico
    holidays
    north view
    print
    North Grounds
    This Christmas card was presented to White House Executive Chef Henry Haller from First Lady Lady Bird Johnson and President Lyndon B. Johnson in December 1966. This was Haller's first Christmas at the White House, though he was to remain as executive chef until 1987. The card features an illustration by Robert Laessig of the North Portico, festively decorated for the holidays. The opposite side of the card includes a description of the American Elm tree featured in the illustration, which was planted by President Woodrow Wilson in December 1913. To view the card in its entirety, see 1128398. This card is part of a personal collection belonging to Chef Haller. In the position, Haller served five first families and their distinguished guests from 1966-1987.
  • The Flag of the President
    Arthur E. Dubois
    flag
    This presidential flag was a new design ordered from Arthur E. DuBois and George M. Elsey by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. It was a sample submitted for President Harry Truman's approval in August 1945. This flag was first publicly flown on October 27, 1945 when the aircraft carrier Franklin D. Roosevelt was commissioned at Brooklyn Navy Yard. The flag presently remains the same except for the addition of two stars to represent Alaska and Hawaii. Although this is the flag of the president's arms, since it lacks the words around the edge, the flag is not a representation of the official Seal of the President. This photograph was taken by William Phillips.
  • Close Up, East Room Crèche
    Otis Imboden
    holidays
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    creche
    This photograph, taken in December 1971, shows the 18th century crèche (or nativity scene) on display in the East Room during the Richard M. Nixon administration. The crèche was donated to the White House Collection by Mrs. Charles W. Engelhard, Jr. of Far Hills, New Jersey in 1967. The donation included 39 hand-painted figurines. The 14 foot tall crèche setting display was built by Tony Award-winning stage designer Donald Oenslager, with mechanisms for annual disassembly.
  • Close Up, East Room Crèche
    Otis Imboden
    holidays
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    creche
    This photograph, taken in December 1971, shows the 18th century crèche (or nativity scene) on display in the East Room during the Richard M. Nixon administration. The crèche was donated to the White House Collection by Mrs. Charles W. Engelhard, Jr. of Far Hills, New Jersey in 1967. The donation included 39 hand-painted figurines. The 14 foot tall crèche setting display was built by Tony Award-winning stage designer Donald Oenslager, with mechanisms for annual disassembly.
  • Crèche on Display in the East Room
    Otis Imboden
    holidays
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    creche
    This photograph, taken in December 1971, shows the 18th century crèche (or nativity scene) on display in the East Room during the Richard M. Nixon administration. The crèche was donated to the White House Collection by Mrs. Charles W. Engelhard, Jr. of Far Hills, New Jersey in 1967. The donation included 39 hand-painted figurines. The 14 foot tall crèche setting display was built by Tony Award-winning stage designer Donald Oenslager, with mechanisms for annual disassembly.
  • Crèche on Display in the East Room
    Otis Imboden
    holidays
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    creche
    This photograph, taken in December 1971, shows the 18th century crèche (or nativity scene) on display in the East Room during the Richard M. Nixon administration. The crèche was donated to the White House Collection by Mrs. Charles W. Engelhard, Jr. of Far Hills, New Jersey in 1967. The donation included 39 hand-painted figurines. The 14 foot tall crèche setting display was built by Tony Award-winning stage designer Donald Oenslager, with mechanisms for annual disassembly.
  • Crèche on Display in the East Room
    Otis Imboden
    holidays
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    creche
    This photograph, taken in December 1971, shows the 18th century crèche (or nativity scene) on display in the East Room during the Richard M. Nixon administration. The crèche was donated to the White House Collection by Mrs. Charles W. Engelhard, Jr. of Far Hills, New Jersey in 1967. The donation included 39 hand-painted figurines. The 14 foot tall crèche setting display was built by Tony Award-winning stage designer Donald Oenslager, with mechanisms for annual disassembly.
  • Crèche on Display in the East Room
    Otis Imboden
    holidays
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    creche
    This photograph, taken in December 1971, shows the 18th century crèche (or nativity scene) on display in the East Room during the Richard M. Nixon administration. The crèche was donated to the White House Collection by Mrs. Charles W. Engelhard, Jr. of Far Hills, New Jersey in 1967. The donation included 39 hand-painted figurines. The 14 foot tall crèche setting display was built by Tony Award-winning stage designer Donald Oenslager, with mechanisms for annual disassembly.
  • Mirrored Wall Sconce, Greeen Room
    Samuel McIntire
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This mahogany mirrored wall sconce was likely created by American craftsman Samuel McIntire around 1800. McIntire is attributed with creating this sconce, and it's twin, due to the skilled craftsmanship and design. The sconce is seen here on the west wall of the Green Room, in a photograph by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes in January 1972, during the administration of Richard M. Nixon.