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  • The Flag of the President
    Arthur E. Dubois
    flag
    This presidential flag was a new design ordered from Arthur E. DuBois and George M. Elsey by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. It was a sample submitted for President Harry Truman's approval in August 1945. This flag was first publicly flown on October 27, 1945 when the aircraft carrier Franklin D. Roosevelt was commissioned at Brooklyn Navy Yard. The flag presently remains the same except for the addition of two stars to represent Alaska and Hawaii. Although this is the flag of the president's arms, since it lacks the words around the edge, the flag is not a representation of the official Seal of the President. This photograph was taken by William Phillips.
  • Close Up, East Room Crèche
    Otis Imboden
    holidays
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    creche
    This photograph, taken in December 1971, shows the 18th century crèche (or nativity scene) on display in the East Room during the Richard M. Nixon administration. The crèche was donated to the White House Collection by Mrs. Charles W. Engelhard, Jr. of Far Hills, New Jersey in 1967. The donation included 39 hand-painted figurines. The 14 foot tall crèche setting display was built by Tony Award-winning stage designer Donald Oenslager, with mechanisms for annual disassembly.
  • Close Up, East Room Crèche
    Otis Imboden
    holidays
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    creche
    This photograph, taken in December 1971, shows the 18th century crèche (or nativity scene) on display in the East Room during the Richard M. Nixon administration. The crèche was donated to the White House Collection by Mrs. Charles W. Engelhard, Jr. of Far Hills, New Jersey in 1967. The donation included 39 hand-painted figurines. The 14 foot tall crèche setting display was built by Tony Award-winning stage designer Donald Oenslager, with mechanisms for annual disassembly.
  • Crèche on Display in the East Room
    Otis Imboden
    holidays
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    creche
    This photograph, taken in December 1971, shows the 18th century crèche (or nativity scene) on display in the East Room during the Richard M. Nixon administration. The crèche was donated to the White House Collection by Mrs. Charles W. Engelhard, Jr. of Far Hills, New Jersey in 1967. The donation included 39 hand-painted figurines. The 14 foot tall crèche setting display was built by Tony Award-winning stage designer Donald Oenslager, with mechanisms for annual disassembly.
  • Crèche on Display in the East Room
    Otis Imboden
    holidays
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    creche
    This photograph, taken in December 1971, shows the 18th century crèche (or nativity scene) on display in the East Room during the Richard M. Nixon administration. The crèche was donated to the White House Collection by Mrs. Charles W. Engelhard, Jr. of Far Hills, New Jersey in 1967. The donation included 39 hand-painted figurines. The 14 foot tall crèche setting display was built by Tony Award-winning stage designer Donald Oenslager, with mechanisms for annual disassembly.
  • Crèche on Display in the East Room
    Otis Imboden
    holidays
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    creche
    This photograph, taken in December 1971, shows the 18th century crèche (or nativity scene) on display in the East Room during the Richard M. Nixon administration. The crèche was donated to the White House Collection by Mrs. Charles W. Engelhard, Jr. of Far Hills, New Jersey in 1967. The donation included 39 hand-painted figurines. The 14 foot tall crèche setting display was built by Tony Award-winning stage designer Donald Oenslager, with mechanisms for annual disassembly.