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  • Going to Church
    George Henry Durrie
    landscape
    snow
    This rural landscape by George Henry Durrie was completed in 1853. A native of New England, Durrie often presented idyllic images of farm life, quiet refuges from America's rapid industrialization and escalating social and political tensions. This winter scene depicts members of a small town heading to church on foot and in horse-drawn sleighs.
  • Medicine Chest
    Unknown
    chest
    This walnut medicine chest with brass and ivory details was taken from the White House during the fire of August 24, 1814 and given to President Franklin D. Roosevelt by a descendant of Thomas Kains, a British naval purser who was part of the British forces in the Chesapeake campaign. Bates Littlehales photographed the chest in March 1962, when it was on loan from the National Archives and Records Administration during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Andrew Jackson
    Samuel M. Charles
    portrait
    This watercolor on ivory portrait of President Andrew Jackson was completed by Samuel M. Charles in 1835. The portrait is signed and dated to the right, reading, "Painted by S M. Charles 1835." Jackson was president from March 4, 1829 until March 4, 1837. Prior to his election, President Jackson served in the United States House of Representatives and United States Senate for the state of Tennessee and was a major general during the War of 1812. Bates Littlehales photographed this portrait in March 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Andrew Jackson
    Samuel M. Charles
    portrait
    This watercolor on ivory portrait of President Andrew Jackson was completed by Samuel M. Charles in 1835. The portrait is signed and dated to the right, reading, "Painted by S M. Charles 1835." Jackson was president from March 4, 1829 until March 4, 1837. Prior to his election, President Jackson served in the United States House of Representatives and United States Senate for the state of Tennessee and was a major general during the War of 1812. Bates Littlehales photographed this portrait in March 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Andrew Jackson
    Samuel M. Charles
    portrait
    This watercolor on ivory portrait of President Andrew Jackson was completed by Samuel M. Charles in 1835. The portrait is signed and dated to the right, reading, "Painted by S M. Charles 1835." Jackson was president from March 4, 1829 until March 4, 1837. Prior to his election, President Jackson served in the United States House of Representatives and United States Senate for the state of Tennessee and was a major general during the War of 1812. Bates Littlehales photographed this portrait in March 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively, and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the portrait in August 1965 at the time of its acquisition into the White House Collection.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively, and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the portrait in August 1965 at the time of its acquisition into the White House Collection.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively, and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the portrait in August 1965 at the time of its acquisition into the White House Collection.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively, and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the portrait in August 1965 at the time of its acquisition into the White House Collection.
  • Torchere, White House Collection
    Unknown
    candelabrum
    gilded bronze
    This is one of a pair of circa 1830-1837 gilded bronze torchères in the White House Collection. They were placed with the Blue Room mantel in the mid-19th century and may have been a gift to President Andrew Jackson by a political supporter. Bates Littlehales photographed the torchere in March 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Victorian Andirons, White House Collection
    Unknown
    andirons
    brass
    This pair of brass, urn shaped andirons are a blend of Chinese and rococo styles. The andirons and a family history of their use in the White House were donated to the White House Collection by relatives of President Taylor's daughter, Betty Taylor Bliss, around 1962. They were photographed by Bates Littlehales in 1962.