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  • Dinner Plate, Truman Service
    Lenox China
    plate
    china
    This dinner plate is from the state service of President Harry S. Truman. The service was made in 1951 by Lenox China of Trenton, New Jersey. This plate was photographed by Bates Littlehales in 1962.
  • Dinner Plate, Truman Service
    Lenox China
    plate
    china
    This dinner plate is from the state service of President Harry S. Truman. The service was made in 1951 by Lenox China of Trenton, New Jersey. This plate was photographed by Bates Littlehales in 1962.
  • Dinner Plate, Theodore Roosevelt Service
    Wedgwood
    plate
    china
    This dinner plate is from the state dinner service selected by President Theodore Roosevelt. The service was created by the English firm Wedgwood in 1903 and features a delicate gilt pattern known as "Ulunda" and the Great Seal of the United States. The plate was photographed by Bates Littlehales in April 1962.
  • Dinner Plate, Truman Service
    Lenox China
    plate
    china
    This dinner plate is from the state service of President Harry S. Truman. The service was made in 1951 by Lenox China of Trenton, New Jersey. This plate was photographed by Bates Littlehales in 1962.
  • Dinner Plate, Theodore Roosevelt Service
    Wedgwood
    plate
    china
    This dinner plate is from the state dinner service selected by President Theodore Roosevelt. The service was created by the English firm Wedgwood in 1903 and features a delicate gilt pattern known as "Ulunda" and the Great Seal of the United States. The plate was photographed by Bates Littlehales in April 1962.
  • Dinner Plate, Truman Service
    Lenox China
    plate
    china
    This dinner plate is from the state service of President Harry S. Truman. The service was made in 1951 by Lenox China of Trenton, New Jersey. This plate was photographed by Bates Littlehales in 1962.
  • Dinner Plate, Theodore Roosevelt Service
    Wedgwood
    plate
    china
    This dinner plate is from the state dinner service selected by President Theodore Roosevelt. The service was created by the English firm Wedgwood in 1903 and features a delicate gilt pattern known as "Ulunda" and the Great Seal of the United States. The plate was photographed by Bates Littlehales in April 1962.
  • Dinner Plate, Truman Service
    Lenox China
    plate
    china
    This dinner plate is from the state service of President Harry S. Truman. The service was made in 1951 by Lenox China of Trenton, New Jersey. This plate was photographed by Bates Littlehales in 1962.
  • Dinner Plate, Theodore Roosevelt Service
    Wedgwood
    plate
    china
    This dinner plate is from the state dinner service selected by President Theodore Roosevelt. The service was created by the English firm Wedgwood in 1903 and features a delicate gilt pattern known as "Ulunda" and the Great Seal of the United States. The plate was photographed by Bates Littlehales in April 1962.
  • First Stop, the Stone Yard at Tiber Creek
    Dahl Taylor 
    drawings & plans 
    This drawing by Dahl Taylor is of the Stone Yard at Tiber Creek. Here the stones were graded for quality, and selected for the walls or ornamental carvings. It is one in a series of eleven drawings illustrating the journey of the stones used to build the White House from Aquia Quarry to the building site.
  • At the Building Site, Finishing the Stone
    Dahl Taylor 
    drawings & plans 
    This drawing by Dahl Taylor is of a stonemason carving a piece of exterior molding at the building site of the White House. It is one in a series of eleven drawings illustrating the journey of the stones used to build the White House from Aquia Quarry to the building site.
  • At the Quarry, Splitting the Stone
    Dahl Taylor 
    drawings & plans 
    This drawing by Dahl Taylor is of a stonemason further splitting the stone hewed from a rock formation. The stonemason taps the inserted nine iron rods or “points” with a small mallet to separate the stone. It is one in a series of eleven drawings illustrating the journey of the stones used to build the White House from Aquia Quarry to the building site.
  • Old Basement Groin Vaulting
    Dahl Taylor 
    drawings & plans 
    This drawing of the White House groin vaulting was done by artist Dahl Taylor. The groin vaulting and a support system of arches was originally constructed in the old basement of the Executive Mansion by stonemasons under the supervision of Collen Williamson and Jeremiah Kale. The original vaulting survived until the Harry S. Truman renovation from 1948-1952.
  • At the White House Building Site, Finishing the Stone
    Dahl Taylor 
    drawings & plans 
    This drawing by Dahl Taylor depicts two stonemasons finishing the details on decorative stones for the White House. One stonemason smooths a stone cornice with his mallet and chisel. The other carves an acanthus leaf onto a window console. It is one in a series of eleven drawings illustrating the journey of the stones used to build the White House from Aquia quarry to the building site.
  • At the Building Site, Finishing the Stone
    Dahl Taylor 
    drawings & plans 
    This drawing by Dahl Taylor is of a stonemason smoothing a section of a stone cornice with his mallet and chisel. It is one in a series of eleven drawings illustrating the journey of the stones used to build the White House from Aquia quarry to the building site.
  • At the Building Site, Finishing the Stone
    Dahl Taylor 
    drawings & plans 
    This drawing by Dahl Taylor depicts a stonemason tracing a guilloche [border], or braid onto a piece of stone using a template.[needs a space] It is one in a series of eleven drawings illustrating the journey of the stones used to build the White House from Aquia Quarry to the building site.
  • At the Building Site, Finishing the Stone
    Dahl Taylor 
    drawings & plans 
    This drawing by Dahl Taylor is of stonemasons smoothing and polishing the stone by rubbing it with a [delete a] another stone or using a flat chisel. It is one in a series of eleven drawings illustrating the journey of the stones used to build the White House from Aquia Quarry to the building site.
  • At the Building Site, Finishing the Stone
    Dahl Taylor 
    drawings & plans 
    This drawing by Dahl Taylor is of a stonemason refining the volute on one of the heroic pilasters. A pilaster is an ornamental architectural feature designed to look like supporting column. It is one in a series of eleven drawings illustrating the journey of the stones used to build the White House from Aquia Quarry to the building site.
  • Upriver, From Quarry to Building Site
    Dahl Taylor 
    drawings & plans 
    This drawing by Dahl Taylor is of three workers delivering stone from the quarry to the building site by ferrying it up the Potomac River and into Tiber Creek. It is one in a series of eleven drawings illustrating the journey of the stones used to build the White House from Aquia Quarry to the building site.
  • At the Quarry, Splitting the Stone
    Dahl Taylor 
    drawings & plans 
    This drawing by Dahl Taylor is of three workers splitting the stone in Aquia quarry. One man holds the “drill”—a threaded wrought-iron spike—while the other two strike the drill with their stone hammers. After alternating strikes, the seated man turns the drill several times, boring down as far as possible, and the striking resumes. When the process was complete, they would go down the line and repeat the same steps with a new hole until the stone was separated from the rock formation. It is one in a series of eleven drawings illustrating the journey of the stones used to build the White House from Aquia Quarry to the building site.
  • Loading the Stone onto an Oxcart
    Dahl Taylor 
    drawings & plans 
    This drawing by Dahl Taylor is of workers loading the stone from the quarry onto an oxcart to[transport to a stone boat for delivery to the building site. It is one in a series of eleven drawings illustrating the journey of the stones used to build the White House from Aquia Quarry to the building site.
  • Eagle Pedestal, Steinway Piano
    Matthew D'Agostino
    piano
    This photograph of the Steinway piano eagle pedestal was taken in the Entrance Hall on July 20, 2017 by Matthew D'Agostino. The mahogany concert grand piano with supporting eagles of gold leaf was presented to the White House by Steinway & Sons on December 10, 1938. The piano was designed by architect Eric Gugler who was also responsible for the 1934 expansion of the West Wing. The Entrance Hall is located on the State Floor of the White House.