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  • China Room, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Unknown
    China Room
    Ground Floor
    This photograph is of the China Room as appeared before First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy's refurbishment of the rooms in the White House. The China Room is located on the Ground Floor of the White House and has been used to display ceramics, glass, and other decorative arts since 1917. The pieces on display are a collection of items used in the White House by first families, including state china services commissioned during a presidency. Howard Chandler Christy's portrait of First Lady Grace Goodhue Coolidge was hung in the room in 1952. The image was taken on August 14, 1961 by a National Geographic staff photographer for the White Historical Association's 1962 publication of "The White House: A Historic Guide". The publication serves as a companion book for tours of the White House, providing history of the rooms, architecture, and furniture.
  • First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy's Bedroom
    Unknown
    Bedroom
    refurbishment
    This photograph shows First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy's bedroom. The bedroom was in the process of being redesigned by French interior designer Stéphane Boudin. Boudin reconfigured the furniture arrangement and included one of the president’s own rocking chairs.
  • China Room, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Unknown
    China Room
    Ground Floor
    This photograph is of the China Room as it appeared before First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy's refurbishment of the rooms in the White House. The China Room is located on the Ground Floor of the White House and has been used to display ceramics, glass, and other decorative arts since 1917. The pieces on display are a collection of items used in the White House by first families, including state china services commissioned during a presidency. Howard Chandler Christy's portrait of First Lady Grace Goodhue Coolidge was hung in the room in 1952. The image was taken on August 14, 1961 by a National Geographic staff photographer for the White Historical Association's 1962 publication of "The White House: A Historic Guide". The publication serves as a companion book for tours of the White House, providing history of the rooms, architecture, and furniture.
  • White House Library, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Unknown
    Ground Floor
    Library
    This photograph is of the White House Library as it appeared before First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy's refurbishment of the rooms in the White House. The Library is located on the Ground Floor of the White House. Although libraries have been a mainstay in the White House since the Millard Fillmore administration, it was not until 1935 that President Franklin D. Roosevelt formally designated a room for the library. The Library boasts thousands of books and the room occasionally serves as the backdrop for meetings, interviews, or televised speeches. The image was taken on August 14, 1961 by a National Geographic staff photographer for the White Historical Association's 1962 publication of "The White House: A Historic Guide". The publication serves as a companion book for tours of the White House, providing history of the rooms, architecture, and furniture.
  • Red Room Circa 1877
    Unknown
    Red Room
    State Floor
    This stereograph of the Red Room was taken circa 1877, around the time of the Ulysses S. Grant and Rutherford B. Hayes administrations. The Red Room is shown with the framed panels that inspired French interior designer Stéphane Boudin’s treatment of the Treaty Room on the Second Floor. Boudin worked with First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy on her White House restoration project, including the Treaty Room. The Red Room is located on the State Floor of the Executive Mansion. The room was first decorated with red fabrics during the James K. Polk administration in 1845. The space is often filled with furnishings in the American “Empire” or “Grecian” style. The parlor has been used for intimate receptions, teas, and meetings.
  • White House Family Kitchen
    Unknown
    Second Floor
    Family Kitchen
    This photograph of the private Family Kitchen on the Second Floor of the White House was taken in the mid-20th century, circa 1966-1987. Unlike the formal kitchen on the Ground Floor, where the White House Kitchen staff prepares elaborate meals for first families and their distinguished guests, the Family Kitchen offers a space for White House residents to prepare meals for themselves. The Family Kitchen gave President Jimmy Carter a private space to prepare his morning cup of coffee when he awoke at around 5:30AM, and gave President Gerald R. Ford a place to toast his favorite breakfast of English muffins. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Red Room, Johnson Administration
    Unknown
    Red Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Red Room was likely taken circa 1962-1964, early into the administration of Lyndon B. Johnson. The Red Room is located on the State Floor of the Executive Mansion. The room was first decorated with red fabrics during the James K. Polk administration in 1845. The richly decorated room is filled with furnishings in the American “Empire” or “Grecian” style. The parlor has been used for intimate receptions, teas, and meetings. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Kitchen, Theodore Roosevelt Administration
    Unknown
    Ground Floor
    Kitchen
    This black-and-white photograph is a reprint of the Kitchen on the Ground Floor of the White House as it appeared during the administration of Theodore Roosevelt. In 1902, Roosevelt oversaw a significant remodeling project for the White House, including a re-configuring of the White House kitchens. Roosevelt unified the numerous basement kitchens into one large main kitchen and one everyday kitchen. The new kitchens featured white tile, nickel plate, and gloss white painted wall and floor finishes that gleamed. The larger of the remodeled kitchens, pictured in this photograph, was used to prepare meals for State functions, and equipped with four gas ovens and two hotel-size gas ranges. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987, catering to five first families and their distinguished guests.
  • Blue Room, Nixon Administration
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Blue Room
    renovation
    refurbishment
    This photograph shows the Blue Room of the White House as it appeared following a renovation project by First Lady Pat Nixon in 1972. Mrs. Nixon was assisted by White House Curator Clement E. Conger and design consultant Edward Vason Jones. The refurbished Blue Room’s style was inspired by the French Bellangé suite of furniture President James Monroe purchased for the room in 1817. The walls were covered with beige wallpaper, featuring an upper frieze with a flower and bowl design, and a lower border of pink flowers, cupids, and Greek figures. Blue curtains hung the length of the room. The room also included a new oval plaster design in the center of the ceiling completed by Herbert John Millard, a wood carver from Roswell, Georgia.
  • Blue Room, Nixon Administration
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Blue Room
    renovation
    refurbishment
    This photograph shows the Blue Room of the White House as it appeared following a renovation project by First Lady Pat Nixon in 1972. Mrs. Nixon was assisted by White House Curator Clement E. Conger and design consultant Edward Vason Jones. The refurbished Blue Room’s style was inspired by the French Bellangé suite of furniture President James Monroe purchased for the room in 1817. The walls were covered with beige wallpaper, featuring an upper frieze with a flower and bowl design, and a lower border of pink flowers, cupids, and Greek figures. Blue curtains hung the length of the room. The room also included a new oval plaster design in the center of the ceiling completed by Herbert John Millard, a wood carver from Roswell, Georgia.
  • Blue Room, Nixon Administration
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Blue Room
    renovation
    refurbishment
    This photograph shows the Blue Room of the White House as it appeared following a renovation project by First Lady Pat Nixon in 1972. Mrs. Nixon was assisted by White House Curator Clement E. Conger and design consultant Edward Vason Jones. The refurbished Blue Room’s style was inspired by the French Bellangé suite of furniture President James Monroe purchased for the room in 1817. The walls were covered with beige wallpaper, featuring an upper frieze with a flower and bowl design, and a lower border of pink flowers, cupids, and Greek figures. Blue curtains hung the length of the room. The room also included a new oval plaster design in the center of the ceiling completed by Herbert John Millard, a wood carver from Roswell, Georgia.
  • Collen Williamson's Water Table
    Unknown
    renovation
    This photograph of the White House water table was taken during the Truman R[r]enovation from 1948 to 1952. It was originally laid under the supervision of stonemason Collen Williamson.
  • Entrance Hall and Bellange Pier Table
    Unknown
    Entrance Hall
    table
    This photograph of the White House Entrance Hall was taken in 2003. A prominent feature in the entryway, located just inside the North Portico, is the pier table shown here. The table is part of the Bellange suite of furniture that President James Monroe purchased in Paris and brought with him to the White House when he became president. Of the original 53 piece set, it is the only known item to remain continuously in the White House. The pier table is believed to have been built around 1817.
  • Laying Subflooring in Center Hall
    Unknown
    renovation
    Center Hall
    Second Floor
    This photograph shows a work crew laying subflooring in the Center Hall on the Second Floor of the Executive Mansion. This work was part of President Harry S. Truman's large-scale 1948-1952 renovation of the White House.
  • White House Laundry
    Unknown
    Ground Floor
    This photograph was taken in 1917 and shows the White House laundry. First Lady Ellen Wilson devised the idea to convert this space to a walkway so President Woodrow Wilson would not have to walk through it to get to the West Wing from the residence.
  • The White House "Conservatory Promenade"
    Unknown
    Conservatory
    This photograph taken inside the White House Conservatory captures the footpath that wound around the plants and flowerbeds inside the massive greenhouse. The footpath was coined the "Conservatory Promenade" when it was added during the Rutherford B. Hayes administration. The pathway formed a horseshoe shape and was often featured as part of a tour of the grounds after dinners and parties. The Conservatory resided on the land now occupied by the West Colonnade and West Wing.
  • Place Setting from State Dinner for Prime Minister of Israel, 1980
    Unknown
    place setting
    china service
    State Dinner
    State Dining Room
    State Floor
    This photograph is of a table setting for a state dinner held on April 15, 1980 for Prime Minister Menachem Begin of Israel. The Harry S. Truman service, visible here, was often used by President Jimmy Carter for official entertaining.
  • State Dining Room Decorated for Luncheon, 1881
    Unknown
    State Dining Room
    State Floor
    place setting
    This black and white photograph is of the State Dining room is set with dinner plates from the Hayes state china service and the Dorflinger glassware, first purchased during the Lincoln administration, for a formal luncheon on January 6, 1881. The place setting at the lower left is the “raccoon” dinner plate.
  • Panel Frieze in State Dining Room
    Unknown
    State Dining Room
    State Floor
    This photograph is of a panel frieze in the State Dining Room. Elements of the frieze were used to inspire the design of the 200th anniversary service ordered by President William J. Clinton and First Lady Hillary Clinton.
  • East Room Decorated for Dinner Honoring Prince Henry of Prussia
    Unknown
    East Room
    This image depicts the East Room of the White House decorated for a dinner honoring Prince Henry of Prussia on February 24, 1902 during the administration of President Theodore Roosevelt. Decorations included smilax festoons, white and pink azaleas, ferns, and palms. Red, white, and blue lights decorated the room, and the East Room’s chandeliers were draped in vines for a dinner referred to as “the crowning event” of Prince Henry’s 1902 visit to Washington, D.C.
  • White House Indoor Pool, Franklin D. Roosevelt Administration
    Unknown
    Swimming Pool
    swimming pool
    This black and white photograph depicts the indoor pool of the White House built in 1933 during the administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1970, the indoor pool was converted into the White House Press Room. An outdoor pool replaced the indoor pool in 1975. Lorenzo Simmons Winslow designed the room with Douglas H. Gillette as an engineer.
  • Blue Room, Andrew Johnson Administration
    Unknown
    Blue Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Blue Room was taken in the early 1870s, likely during the Ulysses S. Grant administration. Andrew Johnson's daughter, Martha Johnson Patterson, decorated the room during his administration (1865-1869) with geometrical patterns to contrast with the oval shape of the room. The Blue Room is located on the State Floor of the Executive Mansion and is famous for its oval shape, central location, and views of the Washington Monument and Jefferson Memorial through the South Portico windows. This photograph was shot looking north.
  • White House Library, Andrew Johnson Administration
    Unknown
    Yellow Oval Room
    Second Floor
    This circa 1866 wood engraving depicts the Yellow Oval Room during the administration of President Andrew Johnson as it appeared during its use as a library during the mid/late-nineteenth century. First Lady Abigail Fillmore received Congressional appropriation to start a library in 1850. At the right of the image is a bearskin chair, presented to President Andrew Johnson by famous California hunter Seth Kinman.
  • Blue Room at the Time of the Theodore Roosevelt Renovation
    Unknown
    Blue Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Blue Room was taken around 1901 and shows the Neo-Georgian, or Colonial Revival, decor of the William McKinley administration just prior to the Theodore Roosevelt Renovation. The Blue Room is located on the State Floor of the Executive Mansion and is famous for its oval shape, central location, and views of the Washington Monument and Jefferson Memorial through the South Portico windows. This photograph was shot looking east. Today, in between the fireplace and the window is a doorway leading to the Green Room.
  • East Room, Ulysses S. Grant Administration
    Unknown
    East Room
    State Floor
    This post-1873/circa 1870s black and white photograph depicts the East Room of the White House after its redecoration by President Ulysses S. Grant. President Grant added two beams supported by gold and white columns and painted the ceiling spaces between the columns blue and soft pink. Grey and gold wallpaper, new fireplace mantels and mirrors, rows of columns, and new gas chandeliers defined Grant's "Gilded Age" East Room.