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  • East Sitting Hall, Carter Administration
    Steve Raymer
    Second Floor
    East Sitting Hall
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Steve Raymer, shows the East Sitting Hall as it appeared in August 1978, during the administration of President Jimmy Carter. The East Sitting Hall is located on the Second Floor of the Executive Mansion. Before the President's offices were moved to the West Wing in 1902, clerks, government officials, and newspaper reporters waited in the East Sitting Hall in hopes of an audience with the president. Located just outside the Lincoln Bedroom, the East Sitting Hall now serves as an informal living area for guests of the First Family.
  • East Sitting Hall, Carter Administration
    Steve Raymer
    Second Floor
    East Sitting Hall
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Steve Raymer, shows the East Sitting Hall as it appeared in August 1978, during the administration of President Jimmy Carter. The East Sitting Hall is located on the Second Floor of the Executive Mansion. Before the President's offices were moved to the West Wing in 1902, clerks, government officials, and newspaper reporters waited in the East Sitting Hall in hopes of an audience with the president. Located just outside the Lincoln Bedroom, the East Sitting Hall now serves as an informal living area for guests of the First Family.
  • East Sitting Hall, Carter Administration
    Steve Raymer
    Second Floor
    East Sitting Hall
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Steve Raymer, shows the East Sitting Hall as it appeared in August 1978, during the administration of President Jimmy Carter. The East Sitting Hall is located on the Second Floor of the Executive Mansion. Before the President's offices were moved to the West Wing in 1902, clerks, government officials, and newspaper reporters waited in the East Sitting Hall in hopes of an audience with the president. Located just outside the Lincoln Bedroom, the East Sitting Hall now serves as an informal living area for guests of the First Family.
  • East Sitting Hall, Carter Administration
    Steve Raymer
    Second Floor
    East Sitting Hall
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Steve Raymer, shows the East Sitting Hall as it appeared in August 1978, during the administration of President Jimmy Carter. The East Sitting Hall is located on the Second Floor of the Executive Mansion. Before the President's offices were moved to the West Wing in 1902, clerks, government officials, and newspaper reporters waited in the East Sitting Hall in hopes of an audience with the president. Located just outside the Lincoln Bedroom, the East Sitting Hall now serves as an informal living area for guests of the First Family.
  • East Sitting Hall, Carter Administration
    Steve Raymer
    Second Floor
    East Sitting Hall
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Steve Raymer, shows the East Sitting Hall as it appeared in August 1978, during the administration of President Jimmy Carter. The East Sitting Hall is located on the Second Floor of the Executive Mansion. Before the President's offices were moved to the West Wing in 1902, clerks, government officials, and newspaper reporters waited in the East Sitting Hall in hopes of an audience with the president. Located just outside the Lincoln Bedroom, the East Sitting Hall now serves as an informal living area for guests of the First Family.
  • Dedication Plaque in James S. Brady Press Room
    Matthew D'Agostino
    West Wing
    Press Room
    This photograph, taken by Matthew D'Agostino on April 6, 2015, shows a dedication plaque on the wall of the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room in the West Wing of the White House. The Press Room was created in 1969 under President Richard M. Nixon in a location previously used as a swimming pool. In 2000, it was renamed the James S. Brady Press Room in honor of the press secretary to former President Ronald Reagan. This photograph was taken during a press briefing where Josh Earnest, press secretary for President Barack Obama, accompanied Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz in a discussion of the developing framework for the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, commonly known as the Iran nuclear deal.
  • Spring in the West Garden Room, Obama Administration
    Matthew D'Agostino
    flower
    West Garden Room
    West Wing
    This photograph, taken by Matthew D'Agostino on April 6, 2015 during the Barack Obama administration, shows springtime decorations that adorned the West Garden Room during the annual White House Easter Egg Roll. Plotted flowers bloom on the table, while the allegorical work "Union" by Italian-born artist Constantino Brumidi hangs on the wall. Brumidi completed "Union" and its companion piece "Liberty" in 1869. President Ulysses S. Grant commissioned the works for display in the renovated Entrance Hall of the White House. Representing the indivisibility of the restored Union after the Civil War, both were mounted in the ceiling after completion. The pieces were removed during the Benjamin Harrison administration, and returned to the White House following their rediscovery in 1978.
  • Spring in the West Garden Room, Obama Administration
    Matthew D'Agostino
    flower
    West Garden Room
    West Wing
    This photograph, taken by Matthew D'Agostino on April 6, 2015 during the Barack Obama administration, shows springtime decorations that adorned the West Garden Room during the annual White House Easter Egg Roll. Plotted flowers bloom on the table, while the allegorical work "Union" by Italian-born artist Constantino Brumidi hangs on the wall. Brumidi completed "Union" and its companion piece "Liberty" in 1869. President Ulysses S. Grant commissioned the works for display in the renovated Entrance Hall of the White House. Representing the indivisibility of the restored Union after the Civil War, both were mounted in the ceiling after completion. The pieces were removed during the Benjamin Harrison administration, and returned to the White House following their rediscovery in 1978.
  • Spring in the West Garden Room, Obama Administration
    Matthew D'Agostino
    flower
    West Garden Room
    West Wing
    This photograph, taken by Matthew D'Agostino on April 6, 2015 during the Barack Obama administration, shows springtime decorations that adorned the West Garden Room during the annual White House Easter Egg Roll. Plotted flowers bloom on the table, while the allegorical work "Union" by Italian-born artist Constantino Brumidi hangs on the wall. Brumidi completed "Union" and its companion piece "Liberty" in 1869. President Ulysses S. Grant commissioned the works for display in the renovated Entrance Hall of the White House. Representing the indivisibility of the restored Union after the Civil War, both were mounted in the ceiling after completion. The pieces were removed during the Benjamin Harrison administration, and returned to the White House following their rediscovery in 1978.
  • White House Family Kitchen
    Unknown
    Second Floor
    Family Kitchen
    This photograph of the private Family Kitchen on the Second Floor of the White House was taken in the mid-20th century, circa 1966-1987. Unlike the formal kitchen on the Ground Floor, where the White House Kitchen staff prepares elaborate meals for first families and their distinguished guests, the Family Kitchen offers a space for White House residents to prepare meals for themselves. The Family Kitchen gave President Jimmy Carter a private space to prepare his morning cup of coffee when he awoke at around 5:30AM, and gave President Gerald R. Ford a place to toast his favorite breakfast of English muffins. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Red Room, Johnson Administration
    Unknown
    Red Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Red Room was likely taken circa 1962-1964, early into the administration of Lyndon B. Johnson. The Red Room is located on the State Floor of the Executive Mansion. The room was first decorated with red fabrics during the James K. Polk administration in 1845. The richly decorated room is filled with furnishings in the American “Empire” or “Grecian” style. The parlor has been used for intimate receptions, teas, and meetings. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Kitchen, Theodore Roosevelt Administration
    Unknown
    Ground Floor
    Kitchen
    This black-and-white photograph is a reprint of the Kitchen on the Ground Floor of the White House as it appeared during the administration of Theodore Roosevelt. In 1902, Roosevelt oversaw a significant remodeling project for the White House, including a re-configuring of the White House kitchens. Roosevelt unified the numerous basement kitchens into one large main kitchen and one everyday kitchen. The new kitchens featured white tile, nickel plate, and gloss white painted wall and floor finishes that gleamed. The larger of the remodeled kitchens, pictured in this photograph, was used to prepare meals for State functions, and equipped with four gas ovens and two hotel-size gas ranges. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987, catering to five first families and their distinguished guests.
  • Entrance Hall and Cross Hall, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    State Floor
    Entrance Hall
    Cross Hall
    This photograph of the Entrance Hall and accompanying Cross Hall was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Robert S. Oakes, & Victor Boswell, during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Located on the State Floor of the White House, the Entrance Hall welcomes visitors arriving through the North Portico to the Executive Mansion. The presidential seal is embedded in the wall, located just above the entrance to the Blue Room. On the floor, between the central columns, are bronze stars that commemorate the Roosevelt and Truman renovations in 1902 and 1948-1952. The Cross Hall, seen here in the background with red carpeting, runs the length of the Executive Mansion and offers views of the Red, Green, and Blue Rooms.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Entrance Hall and Cross Hall, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    State Floor
    Entrance Hall
    Cross Hall
    This photograph of the Entrance Hall and accompanying Cross Hall was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Robert S. Oakes, & Victor Boswell, during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Located on the State Floor of the White House, the Entrance Hall welcomes visitors arriving through the North Portico to the Executive Mansion. The presidential seal is embedded in the wall, located just above the entrance to the Blue Room. On the floor, between the central columns, are bronze stars that commemorate the Roosevelt and Truman renovations in 1902 and 1948-1952. The Cross Hall, seen here in the background with red carpeting, runs the length of the Executive Mansion and offers views of the Red, Green, and Blue Rooms.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Entrance Hall and Cross Hall, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    State Floor
    Entrance Hall
    Cross Hall
    This photograph of the Entrance Hall and accompanying Cross Hall was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Robert S. Oakes, & Victor Boswell, during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Located on the State Floor of the White House, the Entrance Hall welcomes visitors arriving through the North Portico to the Executive Mansion. The presidential seal is embedded in the wall, located just above the entrance to the Blue Room. On the floor, between the central columns, are bronze stars that commemorate the Roosevelt and Truman renovations in 1902 and 1948-1952. The Cross Hall, seen here in the background with red carpeting, runs the length of the Executive Mansion and offers views of the Red, Green, and Blue Rooms.
  • Ground Floor Corridor, Nixon Administration
    Robert S. Oakes
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Ground Floor
    Ground Floor Corridor
    This photograph of the Ground Floor Corridor was taken in January 1972 during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Like the Cross Hall connecting the rooms on the State Floor above, the Ground Floor Corridor provides access to the rooms on the lower level of the Executive Mansion, including the Diplomatic Reception Room, the China Room, the Vermeil Room, the Map Room, and the Library. Stretching between the East Wing and the West Wing, the Ground Floor Corridor was originally a dimly lit basement hallway, and the rooms along the corridor were service spaces. The arched ceiling vaults were intended to support the State Floor above, although they are now mainly decorative. During President Theodore Roosevelt's presidency, this hallway was transformed into a space for displaying artwork and china.
  • Ground Floor Corridor, Nixon Administration
    Robert S. Oakes
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Ground Floor
    Ground Floor Corridor
    This photograph of the Ground Floor Corridor was taken in January 1972 during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Like the Cross Hall connecting the rooms on the State Floor above, the Ground Floor Corridor provides access to the rooms on the lower level of the Executive Mansion, including the Diplomatic Reception Room, the China Room, the Vermeil Room, the Map Room, and the Library. Stretching between the East Wing and the West Wing, the Ground Floor Corridor was originally a dimly lit basement hallway, and the rooms along the corridor were service spaces. The arched ceiling vaults were intended to support the State Floor above, although they are now mainly decorative. During President Theodore Roosevelt's presidency, this hallway was transformed into a space for displaying artwork and china.
  • Ground Floor Corridor, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Ground Floor
    Ground Floor Corridor
    This photograph of the Ground Floor Corridor was taken in January 1972 during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Like the Cross Hall connecting the rooms on the State Floor above, the Ground Floor Corridor provides access to the rooms on the lower level of the Executive Mansion, including the Diplomatic Reception Room, the China Room, the Vermeil Room, the Map Room, and the Library. Stretching between the East Wing and the West Wing, the Ground Floor Corridor was originally a dimly lit basement hallway, and the rooms along the corridor were service spaces. The arched ceiling vaults were intended to support the State Floor above, although they are now mainly decorative. During President Theodore Roosevelt's presidency, this hallway was transformed into a space for displaying artwork and china. The figure in this photograph -- either an man or mannequin wearing a visitor's badge -- was captured through double exposure.