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  • Sunny Relaxes in the East Room
    Matthew D'Agostino
    East Room
    State Floor
    pets
    This photograph of Sunny, the Obama family's female Portuguese Water Dog, stretching out on the East Room floor was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on July 1, 2015. President Barack Obama and his family brought Sunny to the White House in 2013. The East Room is located on the State Floor of the White House. The room is the largest room in the White House and is often used as a ceremonial space.
  • Sunny Relaxes in the East Room
    Matthew D'Agostino
    East Room
    State Floor
    pets
    This photograph of Sunny, the Obama family's female Portuguese Water Dog, stretching out on the East Room floor was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on July 1, 2015. President Barack Obama and his family brought Sunny to the White House in 2013. The East Room is located on the State Floor of the White House. The room is the largest room in the White House and is often used as a ceremonial space.
  • Sunny Relaxes in the East Room
    Matthew D'Agostino
    East Room
    State Floor
    pets
    This photograph of Sunny, the Obama family's female Portuguese Water Dog, stretching out on the East Room floor was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on July 1, 2015. President Barack Obama and his family brought Sunny to the White House in 2013. The East Room is located on the State Floor of the White House. The room is the largest room in the White House and is often used as a ceremonial space.
  • Sunny Relaxes in the East Room
    Matthew D'Agostino
    East Room
    State Floor
    pets
    This photograph of Sunny, the Obama family's female Portuguese Water Dog, stretching out on the East Room floor was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on July 1, 2015. President Barack Obama and his family brought Sunny to the White House in 2013. The East Room is located on the State Floor of the White House. The room is the largest room in the White House and is often used as a ceremonial space.
  • Abigail Adams Supervising the Hanging of the Wash in the East Room
    Gordon Phillips
    First Family
    East Room
    This oil on canvas painting was created by Gordon Phillips in 1966. It depicts First Lady Abigail Adams and her granddaughter, Susanna, watching a servant hang laundry in the unfinished East Room. When President John Adams and his family moved into the White House in 1800, many of the rooms and hallways were incomplete. The East Room could not be used as a place to host receptions, so Mrs. Adams used it to dry laundry. Susanna was the daughter of Charles Adams, the President and First Lady's second son and younger brother to future president John Quincy Adams.
  • Ida Saxton McKinley in the Conservatory
    B. Dinst
    portrait
    Conservatory
    This portrait photograph of First Lady Ida Saxton McKinley was taken as she sat in the White House Conservatory. Mrs. McKinley suffered from epilepsy and often took refuge from the public in the Conservatory because of the greenhouse's privacy and splendor. The more iconic images of Mrs. McKinley show her seated in this favorite spot.
  • Miss Lane's Conservatory, at the W.H., Washington
    Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper
    Conservatory
    This lithograph published in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper in 1858 depicts the newly added White House Conservatory. In the print, presumably, is Harriet Lane, President James Buchanan's niece who served as White House hostess during his administration, standing in the Conservatory. The Conservatory was built during Buchanan's administration and stood on the grounds of what is today the West Colonnade and West Wing. The Conservatory had a small, 12 foot passage between the glass room and the Executive Mansion and served as a private space for first families of the era. P. Hall Baglie is credited with the tinting of this lithograph.