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  • Entrance Hall and Cross Hall, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    State Floor
    Entrance Hall
    Cross Hall
    This photograph of the Entrance Hall and accompanying Cross Hall was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Robert S. Oakes, & Victor Boswell, during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Located on the State Floor of the White House, the Entrance Hall welcomes visitors arriving through the North Portico to the Executive Mansion. The presidential seal is embedded in the wall, located just above the entrance to the Blue Room. On the floor, between the central columns, are bronze stars that commemorate the Roosevelt and Truman renovations in 1902 and 1948-1952. The Cross Hall, seen here in the background with red carpeting, runs the length of the Executive Mansion and offers views of the Red, Green, and Blue Rooms.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Entrance Hall and Cross Hall, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    State Floor
    Entrance Hall
    Cross Hall
    This photograph of the Entrance Hall and accompanying Cross Hall was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Robert S. Oakes, & Victor Boswell, during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Located on the State Floor of the White House, the Entrance Hall welcomes visitors arriving through the North Portico to the Executive Mansion. The presidential seal is embedded in the wall, located just above the entrance to the Blue Room. On the floor, between the central columns, are bronze stars that commemorate the Roosevelt and Truman renovations in 1902 and 1948-1952. The Cross Hall, seen here in the background with red carpeting, runs the length of the Executive Mansion and offers views of the Red, Green, and Blue Rooms.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Entrance Hall and Cross Hall, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    State Floor
    Entrance Hall
    Cross Hall
    This photograph of the Entrance Hall and accompanying Cross Hall was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Robert S. Oakes, & Victor Boswell, during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Located on the State Floor of the White House, the Entrance Hall welcomes visitors arriving through the North Portico to the Executive Mansion. The presidential seal is embedded in the wall, located just above the entrance to the Blue Room. On the floor, between the central columns, are bronze stars that commemorate the Roosevelt and Truman renovations in 1902 and 1948-1952. The Cross Hall, seen here in the background with red carpeting, runs the length of the Executive Mansion and offers views of the Red, Green, and Blue Rooms.
  • Ground Floor Corridor, Nixon Administration
    Robert S. Oakes
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Ground Floor
    Ground Floor Corridor
    This photograph of the Ground Floor Corridor was taken in January 1972 during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Like the Cross Hall connecting the rooms on the State Floor above, the Ground Floor Corridor provides access to the rooms on the lower level of the Executive Mansion, including the Diplomatic Reception Room, the China Room, the Vermeil Room, the Map Room, and the Library. Stretching between the East Wing and the West Wing, the Ground Floor Corridor was originally a dimly lit basement hallway, and the rooms along the corridor were service spaces. The arched ceiling vaults were intended to support the State Floor above, although they are now mainly decorative. During President Theodore Roosevelt's presidency, this hallway was transformed into a space for displaying artwork and china.
  • Ground Floor Corridor, Nixon Administration
    Robert S. Oakes
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Ground Floor
    Ground Floor Corridor
    This photograph of the Ground Floor Corridor was taken in January 1972 during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Like the Cross Hall connecting the rooms on the State Floor above, the Ground Floor Corridor provides access to the rooms on the lower level of the Executive Mansion, including the Diplomatic Reception Room, the China Room, the Vermeil Room, the Map Room, and the Library. Stretching between the East Wing and the West Wing, the Ground Floor Corridor was originally a dimly lit basement hallway, and the rooms along the corridor were service spaces. The arched ceiling vaults were intended to support the State Floor above, although they are now mainly decorative. During President Theodore Roosevelt's presidency, this hallway was transformed into a space for displaying artwork and china.
  • Ground Floor Corridor, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Ground Floor
    Ground Floor Corridor
    This photograph of the Ground Floor Corridor was taken in January 1972 during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Like the Cross Hall connecting the rooms on the State Floor above, the Ground Floor Corridor provides access to the rooms on the lower level of the Executive Mansion, including the Diplomatic Reception Room, the China Room, the Vermeil Room, the Map Room, and the Library. Stretching between the East Wing and the West Wing, the Ground Floor Corridor was originally a dimly lit basement hallway, and the rooms along the corridor were service spaces. The arched ceiling vaults were intended to support the State Floor above, although they are now mainly decorative. During President Theodore Roosevelt's presidency, this hallway was transformed into a space for displaying artwork and china. The figure in this photograph -- either an man or mannequin wearing a visitor's badge -- was captured through double exposure.
  • Ground Floor Corridor, Nixon Administration
    Robert S. Oakes
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Ground Floor
    Ground Floor Corridor
    This photograph of the Ground Floor Corridor was taken in January 1972 during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Like the Cross Hall connecting the rooms on the State Floor above, the Ground Floor Corridor provides access to the rooms on the lower level of the Executive Mansion, including the Diplomatic Reception Room, the China Room, the Vermeil Room, the Map Room, and the Library. Stretching between the East Wing and the West Wing, the Ground Floor Corridor was originally a dimly lit basement hallway, and the rooms along the corridor were service spaces. The arched ceiling vaults were intended to support the State Floor above, although they are now mainly decorative. During President Theodore Roosevelt's presidency, this hallway was transformed into a space for displaying artwork and china.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Ground Floor Corridor, Nixon Administration
    Robert S. Oakes
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Ground Floor
    Ground Floor Corridor
    This photograph of the Ground Floor Corridor was taken in January 1972 during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Like the Cross Hall connecting the rooms on the State Floor above, the Ground Floor Corridor provides access to the rooms on the lower level of the Executive Mansion, including the Diplomatic Reception Room, the China Room, the Vermeil Room, the Map Room, and the Library. Stretching between the East Wing and the West Wing, the Ground Floor Corridor was originally a dimly lit basement hallway, and the rooms along the corridor were service spaces. The arched ceiling vaults were intended to support the State Floor above, although they are now mainly decorative. During President Theodore Roosevelt's presidency, this hallway was transformed into a space for displaying artwork and china.
  • Ground Floor Corridor, Nixon Administration
    Robert S. Oakes
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Ground Floor
    Ground Floor Corridor
    This photograph of the Ground Floor Corridor was taken in January 1972 during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Like the Cross Hall connecting the rooms on the State Floor above, the Ground Floor Corridor provides access to the rooms on the lower level of the Executive Mansion, including the Diplomatic Reception Room, the China Room, the Vermeil Room, the Map Room, and the Library. Stretching between the East Wing and the West Wing, the Ground Floor Corridor was originally a dimly lit basement hallway, and the rooms along the corridor were service spaces. The arched ceiling vaults were intended to support the State Floor above, although they are now mainly decorative. During President Theodore Roosevelt's presidency, this hallway was transformed into a space for displaying artwork and china.
  • Ground Floor Corridor, Nixon Administration
    Robert S. Oakes
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Ground Floor
    Ground Floor Corridor
    This photograph of the Ground Floor Corridor was taken in January 1972 during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Like the Cross Hall connecting the rooms on the State Floor above, the Ground Floor Corridor provides access to the rooms on the lower level of the Executive Mansion, including the Diplomatic Reception Room, the China Room, the Vermeil Room, the Map Room, and the Library. Stretching between the East Wing and the West Wing, the Ground Floor Corridor was originally a dimly lit basement hallway, and the rooms along the corridor were service spaces. The arched ceiling vaults were intended to support the State Floor above, although they are now mainly decorative. During President Theodore Roosevelt's presidency, this hallway was transformed into a space for displaying artwork and china.
  • Green Room, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Green Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Green Room was taken in January 1972 by during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Green Room is located on the State Floor of the Executive Mansion. It was the first room named after the color of its textiles and has Federal style furnishings. The elegant but relaxed parlor is used for small gatherings, interviews, and teas.
  • Green Room, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Green Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Green Room was taken in January 1972 by during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Green Room is located on the State Floor of the Executive Mansion. It was the first room named after the color of its textiles and has Federal style furnishings. The elegant but relaxed parlor is used for small gatherings, interviews, and teas.
  • Green Room, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Green Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Green Room was taken in January 1972 by during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Green Room is located on the State Floor of the Executive Mansion. It was the first room named after the color of its textiles and has Federal style furnishings. The elegant but relaxed parlor is used for small gatherings, interviews, and teas.
  • Green Room, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Green Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Green Room was taken in January 1972 by during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Green Room is located on the State Floor of the Executive Mansion. It was the first room named after the color of its textiles and has Federal style furnishings. The elegant but relaxed parlor is used for small gatherings, interviews, and teas.
  • Green Room, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Green Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Green Room was taken in January 1972 during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Green Room is located on the State Floor of the Executive Mansion. It was the first room named after the color of its textiles and has Federal style furnishings. The elegant but relaxed parlor is used for small gatherings, interviews, and teas. The man seated in one of the chairs, possibly a member of the White House staff, is unidentified.
  • Ground Floor Corridor, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Ground Floor
    Ground Floor Corridor
    This photograph of the Ground Floor Corridor was taken in January 1972 during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Like the Cross Hall connecting the rooms on the State Floor above, the Ground Floor Corridor provides access to the rooms on the lower level of the Executive Mansion, including the Diplomatic Reception Room, the China Room, the Vermeil Room, the Map Room, and the Library. Stretching between the East Wing and the West Wing, the Ground Floor Corridor was originally a dimly lit basement hallway, and the rooms along the corridor were service spaces. The arched ceiling vaults were intended to support the State Floor above, although they are now mainly decorative. During President Theodore Roosevelt's presidency, this hallway was transformed into a space for displaying artwork and china.
  • Green Room, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Green Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Green Room was taken in January 1972 during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Green Room is located on the State Floor of the Executive Mansion. It was the first room named after the color of its textiles and has Federal style furnishings. The elegant but relaxed parlor is used for small gatherings, interviews, and teas. The man seated in one of the chairs, possibly a member of the White House staff, is unidentified.