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  • Queens' Sitting Room, Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    Queens' Sitting Room
    Second Floor
    refurbishment
    This photograph of the Queens' Sitting Room was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on August 28, 1963, shortly after First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy's redecoration of the room. Located on the Second Floor of the Executive Mansion, this sitting room is adjacent to the Queens' Bedroom. Mrs. Kennedy added the dark blue and white cotton wallpaper and black and gold furniture and was the previous owner of the tea table at center. Mrs. Kennedy left the tea table at the White House upon her departure.
  • Elevator Hall, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    mirrors
    furniture
    furnishings
    Second Floor
    refurbishment
    This photograph shows the elevator hall on the Second Floor during the John F. Kennedy administration. Like the nearby Center Hall and the East and West Sitting Halls, this space was redecorated by First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. Interior designer Sister Parish envisioned the design concept for the space, while furniture was acquired under the guidance of Henry Francis Du Pont and arranged by interior designer Stéphane Boudin. Prominently featured on the wall here is an 18th-century mirror loaned to the White House by the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association.
  • Floral Arrangements in the Green Room
    Robert L. Knudsen
    meals
    flowers
    decorations
    State Floor
    Green Room
    This photograph is of floral arrangements in the Green Room was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on March 20, 1962. The Green and Red Rooms were decorated for a luncheon in honor of Sylvanus Olympio, President of Togo. The Green Room is located on the State Floor of the Executive Mansion. It was the first room named after the color of its textiles and has Federal style furnishings. The elegant but relaxed parlor is used for small gatherings, interviews, and teas.
  • Vermeil Room, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    Ground Floor
    Vermeil Room
    This photograph of the Vermeil room before First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy's restoration project was taken by White House photographer Robert L. Knudsen on May 8, 1962. The Vermeil Room is located on the Ground Floor of the White House. In 1957, during the Dwight D. Eisenhower administration, Margaret Thompson Biddle bequeathed her collection of late 18th and early 19th-century vermeil, or gilded silver, to the White House. The Vermeil Room was named after Biddle's collection, which is on display on the room's shelves. The portraits of first ladies have traditionally hung from the room's walls.
  • Workers Repaint Ground Floor Corridor, Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    restoration
    refurbishment
    Ground Floor Corridor
    Ground Floor
    construction & maintenance
    In this photograph by Robert L. Knudsen, workers repaint the Ground Floor Corridor on September 13, 1961. The painting was part of the refurbishment and restoration of the White House under the guidance of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. Like the Cross Hall connecting the rooms on the State Floor above, the Ground Floor Corridor provides access to the rooms on the lower level of the Executive Mansion, including the Diplomatic Reception Room, the China Room, the Vermeil Room, the Map Room, and the Library. Stretching between the East Wing and the West Wing, the Ground Floor Corridor was originally a dimly lit basement hallway, and the rooms along the corridor were service spaces. The arched ceiling vaults were intended to support the State Floor above, although they are now mainly decorative. During President Theodore Roosevelt's presidency, this hallway was transformed into a space for displaying artwork and china.
  • China Room, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Unknown
    China Room
    Ground Floor
    This photograph is of the China Room as appeared before First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy's refurbishment of the rooms in the White House. The China Room is located on the Ground Floor of the White House and has been used to display ceramics, glass, and other decorative arts since 1917. The pieces on display are a collection of items used in the White House by first families, including state china services commissioned during a presidency. Howard Chandler Christy's portrait of First Lady Grace Goodhue Coolidge was hung in the room in 1952. The image was taken on August 14, 1961 by a National Geographic staff photographer for the White Historical Association's 1962 publication of "The White House: A Historic Guide". The publication serves as a companion book for tours of the White House, providing history of the rooms, architecture, and furniture.
  • Treaty Room, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    restoration
    Treaty Room
    Second Floor
    refurbishment
    This photograph of the Treaty Room was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on May 3, 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration. The Treaty Room is located on the Second Floor of the White House and is used as the president’s private study where the commander-in-chief can analyze reports, hold private meetings, edit speeches, and host family gatherings. It is one of the most historic rooms in the house, bearing witness to the signing of the peace protocol between Spain and United States in 1898, the Limited Nuclear Test Ban between the United States and the Soviet Union in 1963, and is possibly where President James Monroe composed the Monroe Doctrine. It has also served as the Cabinet Room for various administrations including for presidents Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, and William McKinley. In 1962 First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, along with French interior designer Stéphane Boudin, oversaw the restoration of the Treaty Room including the installation of the deep green wallpaper with a red geometric design inspired by a decorative treatment for the State Rooms during the Andrew Johnson administration.
  • Blue Room, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    restoration
    refurbishment
    State Floor
    Blue Room
    textiles
    This photograph of the Blue Room was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on June 4, 1963, following its restoration under the guidance of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. Mrs. Kennedy worked with French interior designer Stéphane Boudin on the restoration of the White House. The continuous valance encircling the top of the room was a technique used by Boudin to unify the room. A 19th-century Savonnerie carpet, a gift of Mary Lasker, was placed on the floor at the center of the room. The Blue Room is located on the State Floor of the Executive Mansion. The oval-shaped parlor has been known as the Blue Room since Martin Van Buren’s 1837 redecoration. The room is often used for receptions, photo opportunities, and during the holiday season is home to the official White House Christmas Tree.
  • Yellow Oval Room, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    Yellow Oval Room
    Second Floor
    refurbishment
    restoration
    This photograph of the Yellow Oval Room was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on August 28, 1963, following its restoration under the guidance of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. Mrs. Kennedy and French interior designer Stéphane Boudin decorated the room with a pair of Louis XVI commodes and a pair of painted English armchairs with French black and ivory striped silk upholstery supplied by Boudin. The Yellow Oval Room has served as a family library, study, and sitting room. Under the direction of Mrs. Kennedy, it was made into a formal drawing room for the first family. The room is also where the president greets guests of honor before State Dinners. The room's color scheme echoes the yellow damask furnishings and curtains selected by First Lady Dolley Madison.
  • Pineapple Sitting Room, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    Third Floor
    refurbishment
    restoration
    This photograph of the Pineapple Sitting Room was taken by Robert Knudsen on August 28, 1963, during the John F. Kennedy administration. The Pineapple Sitting Room and accompanying Pineapple Bedroom are located on the Third Floor of the White House. In 1963 First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy oversaw the restoration of the two rooms, including the installation of light green Japanese silk wallpaper. The room got its name from the pineapple-shaped finials on the two mid-19th century beds located in the companion bedroom.
  • China Room Renovations, Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    restoration
    refurbishment
    construction & maintenance
    Ground Floor
    China Room
    furniture
    seats
    This photograph, taken by Robert L. Knudsen on August 28, 1963, shows the China Room in the midst of refurbishments during the John F. Kennedy administration. As part of the redecoration of the room to a vibrant grey, white, and red color scheme, the central 19th-century gild-framed borne settee was reupholstered in red velvet. The red velvet used for the settee and to line the china cabinet shelves was inspired by the gown seen in Howard Chandler Christy's portrait of First Lady Grace Goodhue Coolidge, first placed in this room in 1952. A circa 1825 marble mantel, seen here at right, was also added to the room during the renovations. The project was overseen by First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy and French interior designer Stéphane Boudin.
  • China Room Renovations, Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    refurbishment
    Ground Floor
    China Room
    construction & maintenance
    This photograph, taken by Robert L. Knudsen on August 28, 1963, shows the China Room in the midst of refurbishments during the John F. Kennedy administration. The room was redecorated to a vibrant grey, white, and red color scheme. The red velvet used for the settee and to line the china cabinet shelves was inspired by the gown seen in Howard Chandler Christy's portrait of First Lady Grace Goodhue Coolidge, first placed in this room in 1952. A circa 1825 marble mantel, seen here, was also added to the room during the renovations. The project was overseen by First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy and French interior designer Stéphane Boudin.
  • Vermeil Room Renovations, Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    refurbishment
    Vermeil Room
    Ground Floor
    construction & maintenance
    This photograph, taken by Robert L. Knudsen on August 28, 1963, shows the Vermeil Room in the midst of refurbishments during the John F. Kennedy administration. First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy collaborated with interior designer Stéphane Boudin to redecorate the room in a blue and white style. The Vermeil Room, located on the Ground Floor of the Executive Mansion, houses the extensive collection of vermeil, or gilded silver, that was bequeathed by Margaret Thompson Biddle to the White House in 1957 during the Dwight D. Eisenhower administration. Prior to the bequest, the room was known as the Social Room because of its proximity to a ladies restroom. First Lady Mamie Eisenhower was the first to display the newly acquired vermeil collection in the room.
  • Family Dining Room, Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    refurbishment
    State Floor
    Family Dining Room
    textiles
    This photograph, taken by Robert L. Knudsen on August 28, 1963, shows the Family Dining Room on the State Floor following the refurbishment and repurposing of the room during the John F. Kennedy administrations. The redecoration of the room followed a vibrant yellow color scheme, featuring a gold lattice and pink rose rug personally selected for the room by interior designer Sister Parish. Other additions to the room included yellow silk curtains, a French white and dark green marble mantel, a New York convex mirror, and an 1859 portrait of Virginia planter Brig. Gen. John Hartwell Cocke by artist Edward Troye, From 1825 to 1962, presidents and their families traditionally dined in the Old Family Dining Room. In 1962 with the addition of a new private family dining room on the Second Floor of the White House, the room was repurposed for small official dinners, working lunches, and also serves as a staging area for state dinners. Located on the State Floor of the White House, the room features architectural details such as elegant plasterwork and vaulted ceilings. During the Barack Obama administration, the room was opened to public tours for the first time.
  • First Lady's Dressing Room, Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    refurbishment
    furnishings
    Bedroom
    furniture
    This photograph, taken by Robert L. Knudsen on August 28, 1963, shows the First Lady's Dressing Room during the John F. Kennedy administration. Prominently featured are a trompe-l’oeil wardrobe and a four-panel French-painted screen displaying a Chinese water garden and faux-marble wainscoting. The wardrobe was designed by Stéphane Boudin and painted by Pierre-Marie Rudelle with scenes from the life of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy.
  • Library, Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    restoration
    refurbishment
    Library
    Ground Floor
    This photograph, taken by Robert L. Knudsen on August 28, 1963, shows the Library on the Ground Floor of the White House shortly after it was redecorated during the John F. Kennedy administration. The refurbishment project was gifted by the American Institute of Interior Designers (AIID) and directed by Henry Frances du Pont. Alterations to the room included the addition of ivory and gold paint to the walls, a circa 1810 octagonal library table, and the acquisition of several of Charles Bird Kings' circa 1822 portraits of American Indian delegates.
  • Center Hall, Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    refurbishment
    painting
    music
    instruments
    furnishings
    Second Floor
    Center Hall
    This photograph, taken by Robert L. Knudsen on August 28, 1963, shows the southeast corner of the Center Hall on the Second Floor of the White House after its redecoration during the John F. Kennedy administration. On the wall hang a series of portraits of American Indians by American author and artist George Catlin borrowed by First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy from the National Gallery of Art. Also visible is a baby grand piano previously owned by President Henry S. Truman, and half of a Chinese Coromandel screen first loaned and subsequently given to the White House by Mrs. Boyd Hatch in 1961. Like the nearby East and West Sitting Halls, this space was redecorated by First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. Interior designer Sister Parish envisioned the design concept for the space, while furniture was acquired under the guidance of Henry Francis du Pont and arranged by interior designer Stéphane Boudin. The Center Hall traverses the length of the Second Floor from the east to the west ends of the Executive Mansion, much like the Cross Hall and the Ground Floor Corridor on the two floors below it. The Center Hall serves as the lifeline of the first family’s residence, leading off into the Lincoln Bedroom, the Yellow Oval Room, and the Treaty Room, among others.
  • Center Hall, Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    refurbishment
    Second Floor
    Center Hall
    painting
    This photograph, taken by Robert L. Knudsen on August 28, 1963, shows the Center Hall on the Second Floor of the White House after its redecoration during the John F. Kennedy administration. On the wall hang a series of portraits of American Indians by American author and artist George Catlin borrowed by First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy from the National Gallery of Art. The portraits hang on either side of a doorway to the bedroom for the president and first lady's children, Caroline and John Jr. Like the nearby East and West Sitting Halls, this space was redecorated by First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. Interior designer Sister Parish envisioned the design concept for the space, while furniture was acquired under the guidance of Henry Francis du Pont and arranged by interior designer Stéphane Boudin. The Center Hall traverses the length of the Second Floor from the east to the west ends of the Executive Mansion, much like the Cross Hall and the Ground Floor Corridor. The Center Hall serves as the lifeline of the first family’s residence, leading off into the Lincoln Bedroom, the Yellow Oval Room, and the Treaty Room, among others.