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  • Photographer Captures White House from Firetruck Ladder
    George F. Mobley
    Bates Littlehales
    north view
    Lafayette Park
    In this photograph from May 1962, a photographer, possibly George F. Mobley of the National Geographic Service, ascends a ladder of a firetruck parked on Pennsylvania Avenue to capture an aerial view of the White House. The photo session was for the cover of the first edition of "The White House: An Historic Guide," a publication released by the White House Historical Association that serves a companion book for tours of the White House, providing history of the rooms, architecture, and furniture.
  • Photographer Captures White House from Firetruck Ladder
    George F. Mobley
    Bates Littlehales
    north view
    Lafayette Park
    In this photograph from May 1962, a photographer, possibly George F. Mobley of the National Geographic Service, ascends a ladder of a firetruck parked on Pennsylvania Avenue to capture an aerial view of the White House. The photo session was for the cover of the first edition of "The White House: An Historic Guide," a publication released by the White House Historical Association that serves a companion book for tours of the White House, providing history of the rooms, architecture, and furniture.
  • Photographer Captures White House from Firetruck Ladder
    George F. Mobley
    Bates Littlehales
    north view
    Lafayette Park
    In this photograph from May 1962, a photographer, possibly George F. Mobley of the National Geographic Service, ascends the ladder of a firetruck parked on Pennsylvania Avenue to capture an aerial view of the White House. The photo session was for the cover of the first edition of "The White House: An Historic Guide," a publication released by the White House Historical Association that serves a companion book for tours of the White House, providing history of the rooms, architecture, and furniture. This photograph was taken from Lafayette Square, just north of the White House.
  • Drawing of the Front Hall's Curved Doorway, Decatur House Collection
    Benjamn Henry Latrobe
    plans
    Decatur House
    Washington, D.C.
    This architectural drawing of the entrance hall doors to Decatur House was created by Benjamin Henry Latrobe in January 1818. The drawing also depicts the door elevation and reflected ceiling. Latrobe is best known as the architect who designed the United States Capitol, St. John's Church, Decatur House in Lafayette Square, the White House East and West Terraces, and the Madison state rooms. He was also the chief engineer for the U.S. Navy. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven, and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into a co-stewardship arrangement of Decatur House.
  • President Hoover Views Fire Damage
    Harris & Ewing
    construction & maintenance
    disasters
    This photograph, taken on January 15, 1930, shows President Herbert Hoover walking past debris and workers repairing fire damage to the West Wing. On the evening of December 24, 1929, the West Wing caught fire, requiring the efforts of 130 firefighters to extinguish the powerful, four-alarm blaze. The fire started when pamphlets in the attic ignited, likely caused by a blocked or faulty chimney vent or defective electric wiring. Following repairs, President Herbert Hoover and his aides returned to the West Wing on April 14, 1930.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Decatur House at Dawn
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Decatur House
    This photograph of Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. The historic home is captured here at dawn. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and the house now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Obama Administration
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Eisenhower Executive Office Building
    This photograph of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. Commissioned by President Ulysses S. Grant and completed in 1888, the majestic building was designed by Alfred Mullet in the Second Empire style, which is characterized by a sloping mansard roof and grand embellishments. Originally known as the State, War and Navy Building, the building houses the offices of much of the president’s staff. This photograph captures the northwest corner of the building, along Pennsylvania Avenue.
  • Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Obama Administration
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Eisenhower Executive Office Building
    This photograph of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. Commissioned by President Ulysses S. Grant and completed in 1888, the majestic building was designed by Alfred Mullet in the Second Empire style, which is characterized by a sloping mansard roof and grand embellishments. Originally known as the State, War and Navy Building, the building houses the offices of much of the president’s staff. This photograph captures the northwest corner of the building, along Pennsylvania Avenue.
  • Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Obama Administration
    Matthew D’Agostino
    Eisenhower Executive Office Building
    This photograph of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building was taken by Matthew D’Agostino for the White House Historical Association on June 21, 2013. Commissioned by President Ulysses S. Grant and completed in 1888, the majestic building was designed by Alfred Mullet in the Second Empire style, which is characterized by a sloping mansard roof and grand embellishments. Originally known as the State, War and Navy Building, the building houses the offices of much of the president’s staff. This photograph captures the northwest corner of the building, along Pennsylvania Avenue.