Are you sure you want to delete this item? Are you sure you want to delete these 0 items?

Download

Oops! Something went wrong! It doesn't appear to have affected your data. Please notify your system administrator if the problem persists. Access denied
Your session was expired. Page will be reloaded.

Processing...

Your assets are ready. If the download does not start automatically, click Download.

Add assets to album

  • South View of the White House at Christmastime, Biden Administration
    Thomas Goertel
    winter holidays
    south view
    South Portico
    This photograph of a south view of the White House was taken by Thomas Goertel from the Ellipse on December 2, 2021, during the National Christmas Tree Lighting ceremony. Holiday lights are entwined in a trio of Christmas wreaths that hang from the Truman Balcony. The lights of the Blue Room Christmas Tree can also be seen through the center windows of the South Portico.
  • South View of the White House at Christmastime, Biden Administration
    Thomas Goertel
    winter holidays
    south view
    South Portico
    This photograph of a south view of the White House was taken by Thomas Goertel from the Ellipse on December 2, 2021, during the National Christmas Tree Lighting ceremony. Holiday lights are entwined in a trio of Christmas wreaths that hang from the Truman Balcony. The lights of the Blue Room Christmas Tree can also be seen through the center windows of the South Portico.
  • South View of the White House at Christmastime, Biden Administration
    Thomas Goertel
    winter holidays
    south view
    South Portico
    This photograph of a south view of the White House was taken by Thomas Goertel from the Ellipse on December 2, 2021, during the National Christmas Tree Lighting ceremony. Holiday lights are entwined in a trio of Christmas wreaths that hang from the Truman Balcony. The lights of the Blue Room Christmas Tree can also be seen through the center windows of the South Portico.
  • South View of the White House at Christmastime, Biden Administration
    Thomas Goertel
    winter holidays
    south view
    South Portico
    This photograph of a south view of the White House was taken by Thomas Goertel from the Ellipse on December 2, 2021, during the National Christmas Tree Lighting ceremony. Holiday lights are entwined in a trio of Christmas wreaths that hang from the Truman Balcony. The lights of the Blue Room Christmas Tree can also be seen through the center windows of the South Portico.
  • South View of the White House at Christmastime, Biden Administration
    Thomas Goertel
    winter holidays
    south view
    South Portico
    This photograph of a south view of the White House was taken by Thomas Goertel from the Ellipse on December 2, 2021, during the National Christmas Tree Lighting ceremony. Holiday lights are entwined in a trio of Christmas wreaths that hang from the Truman Balcony. The lights of the Blue Room Christmas Tree can also be seen through the center windows of the South Portico.
  • South View of the White House at Christmastime, Biden Administration
    Thomas Goertel
    south view
    winter holidays
    Christmas
    Ellipse
    South Portico
    This photograph of a south view of the White House was taken by Thomas Goertel on December 4, 2021, from among the small trees in the Pathway of Peace on the Ellipse. Holiday lights are entwined in a trio of of Christmas wreaths that hang from the Truman Balcony. The lights of the Blue Room Christmas Tree can also be seen through the center window of the South Portico.
  • South View of the White House at Christmastime, Biden Administration
    Thomas Goertel
    Christmas
    Ellipse
    South Portico
    south view
    winter holidays
    This photograph of a south view of the White House was taken by Thomas Goertel on December 4, 2021, from among the small trees in the Pathway of Peace on the Ellipse. Holiday lights are entwined in a trio of of Christmas wreaths that hang from the Truman Balcony. The lights of the Blue Room Christmas Tree can also be seen through the center window of the South Portico.
  • 2021 Holiday Decorations, Biden Administration
    David Wiegold
    winter holidays
    north view
    decorations
    North Portico
    Christmas
    This photograph of holiday wreaths on the north front of the White House was taken by David Wiegold on November 29, 2021 during a press preview of the White House holiday decorations. For their first year in the White House, President Joseph R. Biden and First Lady Dr. Jill Biden chose the theme, "Gifts from the Heart." The theme was meant to honor the things we cherish and bring us together despite the obstacles posed by a pandemic, time, and distance. This was the first time the White House holiday decorations included a large illuminated wreath atop the pediment of the North Portico.
  • 2021 Holiday Decorations, Biden Administration
    David Wiegold
    winter holidays
    north view
    decorations
    North Portico
    Christmas
    This photograph of holiday wreaths on the north front of the White House was taken by David Wiegold on November 29, 2021 during a press preview of the White House holiday decorations. For their first year in the White House, President Joseph R. Biden and First Lady Dr. Jill Biden chose the theme, "Gifts from the Heart." The theme was meant to honor the things we cherish and bring us together despite the obstacles posed by a pandemic, time, and distance. This was the first time the White House holiday decorations included a large illuminated wreath atop the pediment of the North Portico.
  • 2021 Holiday Decorations, Biden Administration
    David Wiegold
    winter holidays
    north view
    decorations
    North Portico
    Christmas
    This photograph of holiday wreaths on the north front of the White House was taken by David Wiegold on November 29, 2021 during a press preview of the White House holiday decorations. For their first year in the White House, President Joseph R. Biden and First Lady Dr. Jill Biden chose the theme, "Gifts from the Heart." The theme was meant to honor the things we cherish and bring us together despite the obstacles posed by a pandemic, time, and distance. This was the first time the White House holiday decorations included a large illuminated wreath atop the pediment of the North Portico.
  • View of the East Front of the President's House, with the Addition of the North and South Porticos
    Benjamin Henry Latrobe
    plans
    east view
    North Portico
    South Portico
    This elevation drawing was created by Benjamin Henry Latrobe in 1807. The architectural drawing shows an east view of the White House, with guests entering and departing the house from the proposed North and South Porticos. The North and South Porticos were not part of James Hoban's original 1792 design for the White House. Although this drawing anticipates the prominent use of columns on the North Portico (completed ca. 1829-1820) and South Portico (completed 1824), it does not reflect the appearance of the North and South Porticos as they were constructed.
  • Photographer Captures White House from Firetruck Ladder
    George F. Mobley
    Bates Littlehales
    north view
    Lafayette Park
    In this photograph from May 1962, a photographer, possibly George F. Mobley of the National Geographic Service, ascends the ladder of a firetruck parked on Pennsylvania Avenue to capture an aerial view of the White House. The photo session was for the cover of the fourth edition of "The White House: An Historic Guide" a publication released by the White House Historical Association that serves a companion book for tours of the White House, providing history of the rooms, architecture, and furniture. This photograph was taken from Lafayette Square, just north of the White House.
  • White House Flag at Half-Staff in Observance of September 11
    Joyce N. Boghosian
    north view
    flags
    commemorations
    September 11
    This photograph, taken by Joyce N. Boghosian on September 11, 2020, shows the American flag atop the White House flown at half-staff in observance of Patriot Day. In 2002, President George W. Bush designated September 11th as Patriot Day, a time that has been recognized through presidential proclamations as a national day of remembrance, prayer, and service. Presidents and first ladies typically commemorate the day through moment of silence observations on the White House South Lawn, and by attending remembrance ceremonies at sites affected by the terrorist attacks.
  • White House Flag at Half-Staff in Observance of September 11
    Joyce N. Boghosian
    north view
    flags
    commemorations
    September 11
    This photograph, taken by Joyce N. Boghosian on September 11, 2020, shows the American flag atop the White House flown at half-staff in observance of Patriot Day. In 2002, President George W. Bush designated September 11th as Patriot Day, a time that has been recognized through presidential proclamations as a national day of remembrance, prayer, and service. Presidents and first ladies typically commemorate the day through moment of silence observations on the White House South Lawn, and by attending remembrance ceremonies at sites affected by the terrorist attacks.
  • Proposed Extension of the Executive Mansion, ca. 1891
    Fred D. Owen
    plans
    documents
    This plan suggested a proposed expansion for the Executive Mansion attributed to First Lady Caroline Harrison around 1891. Compiled and drawn by architect Frederick Dale Owen, the plan proposes the addition of a private central court enclosed by historic and official wings as well as a series of greenhouses and conservatories housing palm gardens and a lily pond. While this proposal never came to be realized, the plan anticipates President Theodore Roosevelt's construction of the East and West Wings in 1902.
  • Aerial View of Washington, D.C.
    Robert L. Knudsen
    Washington, D.C.
    Washington Monument
    National Mall
    National Park
    This photograph taken on April 21, 1962 by Robert L. Knudsen depicts aerial views of Washington, D. C., showing parts of the city during the John F. Kennedy administration. At the time, Washington Monument was separated from the Lincoln Memorial by the “tempos” —temporary buildings—erected during World War II. The foreground features the Smithsonian Institution's Castle, Arts and Industries Building, National Museum of Natural History, and the construction site of the Museum of History and Technology, which was renamed the National Museum of American History in 1980.
  • Aerial View of Washington, D.C.
    Robert L. Knudsen
    Washington, D.C.
    National Mall
    National Park
    This photograph taken on April 21, 1962, by Robert L. Knudsen depicts aerial views of Washington, D. C. showing parts of the city during the John F. Kennedy administration. The White House is visible toward the upper right corner of the picture. The foreground features the Smithsonian Institution's Castle, Arts and Industries Building, National Museum of Natural History, and the construction site of the Museum of History and Technology, which was renamed the National Museum of American History in 1980.
  • Visitors Sign at the East Entrance
    Robert L. Knudsen
    East Entrance
    east view
    This photograph is of the sign at the visitors' entrance where tourists queued for public tours. The image was taken by Robert Knudsen on February 8, 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Rose Garden, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    west view
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    West Colonnade
    This photograph of the Rose Garden was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on July 13, 1962, during the John F. Kennedy administration. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment. This photograph shows the Rose Garden after Rachel Lambert Mellon oversaw its installation.
  • Photographer Captures White House from Firetruck Ladder
    George F. Mobley
    Bates Littlehales
    north view
    In this photograph from May 1962, a photographer, possibly George F. Mobley of the National Geographic Service, ascends the ladder of a firetruck parked on Pennsylvania Avenue to capture an aerial view of the White House. The photo session was for the cover of the fourth edition of "The White House: An Historic Guide," a publication released by the White House Historical Association that serves a companion book for tours of the White House, providing history of the rooms, architecture, and furniture.
  • Drawing of the Front Hall's Curved Doorway, Decatur House Collection
    Benjamn Henry Latrobe
    plans
    Decatur House
    Washington, D.C.
    This architectural drawing of the entrance hall doors to Decatur House was created by Benjamin Henry Latrobe in January 1818. The drawing also depicts the door elevation and reflected ceiling. Latrobe is best known as the architect who designed the United States Capitol, St. John's Church, Decatur House in Lafayette Square, the White House East and West Terraces, and the Madison state rooms. He was also the chief engineer for the U.S. Navy. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven, and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into a co-stewardship arrangement of Decatur House.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.