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  • Drawing of the Front Hall's Curved Doorway, Decatur House Collection
    Benjamn Henry Latrobe
    plans
    Decatur House
    Washington, D.C.
    This architectural drawing of the entrance hall doors to Decatur House was created by Benjamin Henry Latrobe in January 1818. The drawing also depicts the door elevation and reflected ceiling. Latrobe is best known as the architect who designed the United States Capitol, St. John's Church, Decatur House in Lafayette Square, the White House East and West Terraces, and the Madison state rooms. He was also the chief engineer for the U.S. Navy. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven, and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into a co-stewardship arrangement of Decatur House.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • View of the Ellipse from the Washington Monument, NW, Washington, D.C.
    Carol M. Highsmith
    Washington, D.C.
    Ellipse
    aerial view
    This photograph of the Washington, D.C. skyline was taken by Carol M. Highsmith in 2010. Highsmith took the photograph from atop the Washington Monument, looking north toward the Ellipse and White House. The South Lawn and South Portico of the White House is visible just north of the Ellipse.
  • Washington Nationals Play Baseball at Swampoodle Grounds
    Unknown
    Washington, D.C.
    sports
    This photograph of the Washington Nationals baseball team was taken between 1886-1889. The team is seen playing on Swampoodle Grounds, also known as Capitol Park and later the location of Union Station, in northeast Washington, D.C. On August 30, 1865 the Nationals and the Brooklyn Atlantics became the first organized sports teams to visit a president in the White House when they visited President Andrew Johnson following a competition on the White Lot. The White Lot, later known as the Ellipse, was located south of the White House.
  • President Hoover Views Fire Damage
    Harris & Ewing
    construction & maintenance
    disasters
    This photograph, taken on January 15, 1930, shows President Herbert Hoover walking past debris and workers repairing fire damage to the West Wing. On the evening of December 24, 1929, the West Wing caught fire, requiring the efforts of 130 firefighters to extinguish the powerful, four-alarm blaze. The fire started when pamphlets in the attic ignited, likely caused by a blocked or faulty chimney vent or defective electric wiring. Following repairs, President Herbert Hoover and his aides returned to the West Wing on April 14, 1930.
  • Engineers Inspect Fire Damage
    Harris & Ewing
    construction & maintenance
    disasters
    This photograph, taken in January 1930, shows engineers inspecting for fire damage on the roof of the White House. On the evening of December 24, 1929, the West Wing caught fire, requiring the efforts of 130 firefighters to extinguish the powerful, four-alarm blaze. The fire started when pamphlets in the attic ignited, likely caused by a blocked or faulty chimney vent or defective electric wiring. Following repairs, President Herbert Hoover and his aides returned to the West Wing on April 14, 1930.
  • South View, Gerald R. Ford Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    south view
    South Portico
    South Lawn
    This photograph of the south view of the White House was taken in July 1975 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. The South Portico and South Lawn are visible.
  • South View, Gerald R. Ford Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    south view
    South Portico
    South Lawn
    This photograph of the south view of the White House was taken in July 1975 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. The South Portico and South Lawn are visible.
  • South View, Gerald R. Ford Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    south view
    South Portico
    This photograph of the south view of the White House was taken in July 1975 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. Bailey captured South Portico from the viewpoint of the South Lawn.
  • South View, Gerald R. Ford Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    south view
    South Portico
    This photograph of the south view of the White House was taken in July 1975 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. Bailey captured South Portico from the viewpoint of the South Lawn.
  • South View, Gerald R. Ford Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    south view
    South Portico
    This photograph of the south view of the White House was taken in July 1975 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. Bailey captured South Portico from the viewpoint of the South Lawn.
  • South View, Gerald R. Ford Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    south view
    South Portico
    This photograph of the south view of the White House was taken in July 1975 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. Bailey captured South Portico from the viewpoint of the South Lawn.
  • South View, Gerald R. Ford Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    south view
    South Portico
    This photograph of the south view of the White House was taken in July 1975 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. Bailey captured South Portico from the viewpoint of the South Lawn.
  • South View, Gerald R. Ford Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    south view
    South Portico
    This photograph of the south view of the White House was taken in July 1975 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. Bailey captured South Portico from the viewpoint of the South Lawn.
  • South View, Gerald R. Ford Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    south view
    South Portico
    South Lawn
    This photograph of the south view of the White House was taken in July 1975 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. The South Portico and South Lawn are visible.
  • South View, Gerald R. Ford Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    south view
    South Portico
    South Lawn
    This photograph of the south view of the White House was taken in July 1975 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. The South Portico and South Lawn are visible.
  • South View, Gerald R. Ford Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    south view
    South Portico
    South Lawn
    This photograph of the south view of the White House was taken in July 1975 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. The South Portico and South Lawn are visible.
  • North Front of the White House, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    north view
    North Portico
    Lafayette Park
    This photograph of the north view of the White House was taken in July 1982 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The North Portico of the Executive Mansion is visible along with Pennsylvania Avenue in the foreground.