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  • Saucer Magnolia Branch, South Lawn
    James P. Blair
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    flowers
    This photograph is a closeup of a flowering branch on one of the Saucer Magnolia trees planted in the Rose Garden in 1962. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment. James P. Blair photographed the blooms in April 1966, during the Lyndon B. Johnson administration.
  • Saucer Magnolia Branch, South Lawn
    James P. Blair
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    flowers
    This photograph is a closeup of a flowering branch on one of the Saucer Magnolia trees planted in the Rose Garden in 1962. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment. James P. Blair photographed the blooms in April 1966, during the Lyndon B. Johnson administration.
  • Rose Garden, Johnson Administration
    James P. Blair
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    flowers
    This photograph of tulips in the Rose Garden was taken by James P. Blair on April 11, 1966, during the Lyndon B. Johnson administration. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and was replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Johnson Administration
    James P. Blair
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    flowers
    This photograph of tulips in the Rose Garden was taken by James P. Blair on April 11, 1966, during the Lyndon B. Johnson administration. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and was replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Johnson Administration
    James P. Blair
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    flowers
    This photograph of tulips in the Rose Garden was taken by James P. Blair on April 11, 1966, during the Lyndon B. Johnson administration. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and was replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Johnson Administration
    James P. Blair
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    flowers
    This photograph of the Rose Garden was taken by James P. Blair on April 11, 1966, during the Lyndon B. Johnson administration. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and was replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Johnson Administration
    James P. Blair
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    flowers
    This photograph of the Rose Garden was taken by James P. Blair on April 11, 1966, during the Lyndon B. Johnson administration. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and was replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Johnson Administration
    James P. Blair
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    flowers
    This photograph of the Rose Garden was taken by James P. Blair on April 11, 1966, during the Lyndon B. Johnson administration. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and was replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Johnson Administration
    James P. Blair
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    flowers
    This photograph of the Rose Garden was taken by James P. Blair on April 11, 1966, during the Lyndon B. Johnson administration. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and was replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Pergola in the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden
    Matthew D'Agostino
    Jacqueline Kenndy Garden
    This photograph of the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on July 1, 2015, during the Barack Obama administration. The Jacqueline Kennedy Garden is also referred to as the East Garden and is located on the South Grounds of the White House. This pergola was designed by I.M. Pei in 1965.
  • Lilies Along the East Colonnade
    Matthew D'Agostino
    East Wing
    East Colonnade
    This photograph of lilies in the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on July 1, 2015, during the Barack Obama administration. The lilies are seen growing outside the East Colonnade windows. The garden, also known as the East Garden, was dedicated to Jacqueline Kennedy on April 22, 1965 by First Lady Lady Bird Johnson. During her time in the White House, Mrs. Kennedy designed the garden as a counterpoint to President John F. Kennedy's Rose Garden.
  • Lilies Along the East Colonnade
    Matthew D'Agostino
    East Wing
    East Colonnade
    This photograph of lilies in the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on July 1, 2015, during the Barack Obama administration. The lilies are seen growing outside the East Colonnade windows. The garden, also known as the East Garden, was dedicated to Jacqueline Kennedy on April 22, 1965 by First Lady Lady Bird Johnson. During her time in the White House, Mrs. Kennedy designed the garden as a counterpoint to President John F. Kennedy's Rose Garden.
  • North View of the White House, Kennedy Administration
    George F. Mobley
    North Portico
    north view
    This photograph is of the North Lawn of the White House. The fountain in the foreground of the photograph is ringed with red tulips. Photographer George F. Mobley took this image during the evening in May 1962.
  • View of the West Wing, Kennedy Administration
    George F. Mobley
    West Wing
    south view
    This photograph of the West Wing was taken by photographer George F. Mobley in May 1962. The West Wing was constructed as "temporary executive office buildings" during Theodore Roosevelt's administration in 1902. In 1909, the West Wing was expanded and doubled in size during the Taft administration. The expansion saw the construction of the Oval Office. In 1930 during the Hoover administration, the West Wing had to be rebuilt due to a fire that broke out on Christmas Eve. The current incarnation of the West Wing was completed in 1934 during the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt. The wing was expanded from 15,000 to 40,000 square feet and a "penthouse" story and an enlarged subterranean office area with a light well were added to the complex. The Oval Office was relocated to the West Wing’s southeast corner its present location.
  • Pennsylvania Avenue
    George F. Mobley
    Washington, D.C.
    This aerial photograph of Pennsylvania Avenue was taken by George F. Mobley in May 1962. Mobley took a series of photographs of the street during a shoot for the front and back covers of the first edition of "The White House: An Historic Guide."