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  • The Nixons and Apollo 12 Astronauts Greet Choristers
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    worship services
    White House Guests
    State Floor
    Cross Hall
    astronauts
    In this photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph J. Scherschel on December 21, 1969, President Richard M. Nixon, First Lady Pat Nixon, astronauts from the Apollo 12 lunar exploration mission, and their wives greet members of the Boys Choir of the Washington National Cathedral in the Cross Hall. The choristers performed that day at a worship service in the East Room. The crew of Apollo 12 included the second group of astronauts to walk on the moon, on November 19-20, 1969. Cdr. Pete Conrad, his wife, Jane; lunar module pilot Alan Bean, his wife, Sue; and command module pilot Richard F. Gordon, Jr. and his wife, Barbara were the overnight guests of president and Mrs. Nixon at the White House on December 20-21-1969.
  • White House Festival of the Arts
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    visitors
    arts & culture
    South Grounds
    Jacqueline Kennedy Garden
    sculpture
    This photograph is of guests chatting and admiring sculptures in the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden during the White House Festival of the Arts on June 14, 1965. The sculpture "Helmet V" by Dimitri Hadzi is visible in the background. Over 300 guests attended the White House Festival of the Arts to honor contemporary American artistic achievement. 65 works of art borrowed from 39 museums across the country were displayed in the East Wing and Jacqueline Kennedy Garden. The 14-hour event also featured a photography exhibition in the Vermeil Room, a film screening in the State Dining Room, and a variety of performances in the East Room, State Dining Room, and the South Lawn including Duke Ellington, the Robert Joffrey Ballet, and the Louisville Orchestra.
  • White House Festival of the Arts
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    performing
    arts & culture
    State Floor
    East Room
    visitors
    This photograph is of guests listening to a reading in the East Room during the White House Festival of the Arts. The program of prose and poetry readings in the East Room was introduced by Mark Van Doren and featured readings from several authors and poets including Saul Bellow, Catherine Drinker Bowen, John Hersey, and Phillis McGinley. On June 14, 1965 over 300 guests attended the White House Festival of the Arts to honor contemporary American artistic achievement. 65 works of art borrowed from 39 museums across the country were displayed in the East Wing and Jacqueline Kennedy Garden. The 14-hour event also featured a photography exhibition in the Vermeil Room, a film screening in the State Dining Room, and a variety of performances in the East Room, State Dining Room, and the South Lawn including Duke Ellington, the Robert Joffrey Ballet, and the Louisville Orchestra.
  • Presidential Scholars Reception
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    receptions
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    visitors
    This photograph is of guests enjoying themselves at a reception for presidential scholars. President Lyndon B. Johnson established the presidential scholars program in 1964 to honor distinguished graduating high school seniors on the basis of outstanding scholarship, service, leadership, and creativity. The White House Commission on U.S. Presidential Scholars and the US Department of Education administer the review process and have selected over 7000 recipients for this special distinction.
  • White House Festival of the Arts
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    State Floor
    East Room
    performing
    arts & culture
    In this photograph, actors Pat Hingle and Piper Laurie perform a scene from Tennessee Williams' "The Glass Menagerie" in the East Room during the White House Festival of the Arts on June 14, 1965. Actress Helen Hayes introduced selections from four contemporary plays that were performed in the East Room. Along with Laurie and Hingle, Maureen Stapleton and George Grizzard performed scenes from "The Glass Menagerie;" Jack Albertson, Martin Sheen, and Irene Dailey performed excerpts from Frank Gilroy's "The Subject was Roses;" Mildred Dunnock reprised her role from Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman;" and Tim Ligon, Moses Gunn, and other actors from Arena Stage in Washington, D.C. performed a scene from Millard Lampell's "Hard Travelin'." Over 300 guests attended the White House Festival of the Arts to honor contemporary American artistic achievement. 65 works of art borrowed from 39 museums across the country were displayed in the East Wing and Jacqueline Kennedy Garden. The 14-hour event also featured a photography exhibition in the Vermeil Room, a film screening in the State Dining Room, and a variety of performances in the East Room, State Dining Room, and the South Lawn including Duke Ellington, the Robert Joffrey Ballet, and the Louisville Orchestra.
  • White House Festival of the Arts
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    military
    arts & culture
    U.S. Marine Band
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    visitors
    This photograph is of guests enjoying dinner on the South Lawn. Also pictured are members of the United States Marine Band. On June 14, 1965 over 300 guests attended the White House Festival of the Arts to honor contemporary American artistic achievement. 65 works of art borrowed from 39 museums across the country were displayed in the East Wing and Jacqueline Kennedy Garden. The 14-hour event also featured a photography exhibition in the Vermeil Room, a film screening in the State Dining Room, and a variety of performances in the East Room, State Dining Room, and the South Lawn including Duke Ellington, the Robert Joffrey Ballet, and the Louisville Orchestra.
  • White House Festival of the Arts
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    painting
    arts & culture
    East Wing
    East Colonnade
    visitors
    This photograph is of guests viewing "Royal Game I" by Louise Nevelson, which was installed in the East Colonnade for the White House Festival of the Arts. On June 14, 1965 over 300 guests attended the Festival of the Arts to honor contemporary American artistic achievement. 65 works of art borrowed from 39 museums across the country were displayed in the East Wing and Jacqueline Kennedy Garden. The 14-hour event also featured a photography exhibition in the Vermeil Room, a film screening in the State Dining Room, and a variety of performances in the East Room, State Dining Room, and the South Lawn including Duke Ellington, the Robert Joffrey Ballet, and the Louisville Orchestra.
  • White House Festival of the Arts
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    Cross Hall
    arts & culture
    State Floor
    This photograph is of coloratura soprano Roberta Peters talking with guests in the Cross Hall during the White House Festival of the Arts on June 14, 1965. Peters accompanied the Louisville Orchestra for an afternoon program of vocal and symphony music in the State Dining Room, introduced by African American contralto Marian Anderson. During the 40-minute program conducted by Robert Whitney, Peters sang "Glitter and Be Gay" from Leonard Bernstein's "Candide" and "Summertime" from George Gershwin's "Porgy and Bess." Over 300 guests attended the White House Festival of the Arts to honor contemporary American artistic achievement. 65 works of art borrowed from 39 museums across the country were displayed in the East Wing and Jacqueline Kennedy Garden. The 14-hour event also featured a photography exhibition in the Vermeil Room, a film screening in the State Dining Room, and a variety of performances in the East Room, State Dining Room, and the South Lawn including Duke Ellington, the Robert Joffrey Ballet, and the Louisville Orchestra.
  • White House Festival of the Arts
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    military
    arts & culture
    U.S. Marine Band
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    visitors
    In this photograph First Lady Lady Bird Johnson dines with actor Gene Kelly and photographer Edward Steichen at the dinner for the White House Festival of the Arts. On June 14, 1965 over 300 guests attended the White House Festival of the Arts to honor contemporary American artistic achievement. 65 works of art borrowed from 39 museums across the country were displayed in the East Wing and Jacqueline Kennedy Garden. The 14-hour event also featured a photography exhibition in the Vermeil Room, a film screening in the State Dining Room, and a variety of performances in the East Room, State Dining Room, and the South Lawn including Duke Ellington, the Robert Joffrey Ballet, and the Louisville Orchestra.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • Washington, D.C., 1969
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    protests
    Vietnam War
    In this photograph, taken in December 1969 by National Geographic photographer Joseph J. Scherschel, women cross an intersection in Washington, D.C, possibly en route to a demonstration against the Vietnam War, held in front of the north gate of the White House.
  • U.S. Marine Band Performs Near the Rose Garden
    George F. Mobley
    music
    military
    ceremony
    U.S. Marine Band
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    This photograph was taken at a ceremony bestowing former British prime minister Winston Churchill with honorary United States citizenship. The ceremony took place in the Rose Garden on April 9, 1963, during the John F. Kennedy administration. Here, the United States Marine Band performs near the Rose Garden on the South Grounds. Churchill was the first individual to have honorary citizenship granted by the president and recognized by Congress. The elderly politician could not attend the ceremony, but was represented by his son Randolph S. Churchill and his grandson, Winston S. Churchill. Among the other attendees of the event were W. Averell Harriman, Dean Acheson, Bernard M. Baruch, and three sons of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
  • Attendees at Churchill Citizenship Ceremony
    George F. Mobley
    ceremony
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    This photograph is of guests attending a ceremony bestowing former British prime minister Winston Churchill with honorary United States citizenship. The ceremony took place in the Rose Garden on April 9, 1963, during the John F. Kennedy administration. Churchill was the first individual to have honorary citizenship granted by the president and recognized by Congress. The elderly politician could not attend the ceremony, but was represented by his son Randolph S. Churchill and his grandson, Winston S. Churchill. Among the other attendees of the event were W. Averell Harriman, Dean Acheson, Bernard M. Baruch, and three sons of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
  • Attendees at Churchill Citizenship Ceremony
    George F. Mobley
    ceremony
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    This photograph is of guests attending a ceremony bestowing former British prime minister Winston Churchill with honorary United States citizenship. The ceremony took place in the Rose Garden on April 9, 1963, during the John F. Kennedy administration. Churchill was the first individual to have honorary citizenship granted by the president and recognized by Congress. The elderly politician could not attend the ceremony, but was represented by his son Randolph S. Churchill and his grandson, Winston S. Churchill. Among the other attendees of the event were W. Averell Harriman, Dean Acheson, Bernard M. Baruch, and three sons of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
  • Honorary Citizenship Ceremony for Winston Churchill
    George F. Mobley
    press
    ceremony
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    This photograph was taken at a ceremony bestowing former British prime minister Winston Churchill with honorary United States citizenship. The ceremony took place in the Rose Garden on April 9, 1963, during the John F. Kennedy administration. Churchill was the first individual to have honorary citizenship granted by the president and recognized by Congress. The elderly politician could not attend the ceremony, but was represented by his son Randolph S. Churchill and his grandson, Winston S. Churchill. Among the other attendees of the event were W. Averell Harriman, Dean Acheson, Bernard M. Baruch, and three sons of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
  • Honorary Citizenship Ceremony for Winston Churchill
    George F. Mobley
    ceremony
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    This photograph was taken at a ceremony bestowing former British prime minister Winston Churchill with honorary United States citizenship. The ceremony took place in the Rose Garden on April 9, 1963, during the John F. Kennedy administration. Here, President Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy are captured arriving at the ceremony. Churchill was the first individual to have honorary citizenship granted by the president and recognized by Congress. The elderly politician could not attend the ceremony, but was represented by his son Randolph S. Churchill and his grandson, Winston S. Churchill. Among the other attendees of the event were W. Averell Harriman, Dean Acheson, Bernard M. Baruch, and three sons of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
  • Honorary Citizenship Ceremony for Winston Churchill
    George F. Mobley
    ceremony
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    This photograph was taken at a ceremony bestowing former British prime minister Winston Churchill with honorary United States citizenship. The ceremony took place in the Rose Garden on April 9, 1963, during the John F. Kennedy administration. Here, President Kennedy, center right, arrives at the ceremony. Churchill was the first individual to have honorary citizenship granted by the president and recognized by Congress. The elderly politician could not attend the ceremony, but was represented by his son Randolph S. Churchill and his grandson, Winston S. Churchill. Among the other attendees of the event were W. Averell Harriman, Dean Acheson, Bernard M. Baruch, and three sons of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
  • Honorary Citizenship Ceremony for Winston Churchill
    George F. Mobley
    ceremony
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    This photograph was taken at a ceremony bestowing former British prime minister Winston Churchill with honorary United States citizenship. The ceremony took place in the Rose Garden on April 9, 1963, during the John F. Kennedy administration. Here, President Kennedy, center, speaks at the ceremony while First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, right, looks on. Churchill was the first individual to have honorary citizenship granted by the president and recognized by Congress. The elderly politician could not attend the ceremony, but was represented by his son Randolph S. Churchill and his grandson, Winston S. Churchill. Among the other attendees of the event were W. Averell Harriman, Dean Acheson, Bernard M. Baruch, and three sons of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.