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  • Presentation Sword, Decatur House Collection
    William Rose
    Unknown
    furnishings
    swords
    This sword was presented to Commodore Stephen Decatur by the Commonwealth of Virginia following his capture of the Macedonia on October 25, 1812. The blade was created in Philadelphia by William Rose and features an ivory and parcel-gilt hilt topped with a cast eagle, silver gilt plate, and brass stripes on the edges, and inlaid with gold foliage and silver lettering. An inscription on the blade reads, “In testimony of the splendid naval talents and valor displayed by Commodore Stephen Decatur commanding the United States Frigate UNITED STATES in the capture of the English Frigate MACEDONIA 25th, October 1812.” This presentation sword is part of the collection at Decatur House. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and Decatur House now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Sewing Table, Decatur House Collection
    Unknown
    furniture
    furnishings
    This sewing table is made of wood and coated with between three and fifteen layers of fine black and gold lacquer. The sewing table was made in the early 19th century and is believed to have been an engagement gift from Stephen Decatur to his fiancée — a “Miss. King.” The King family passed the table down from generation to generation despite the couple not marrying. Stephen Decatur would go on to marry Susan Wheeler. The sewing table was made in China for the American market and originally had a silk bag attached to it, which was replaced with a mauve damask fabric in the 20th century. This table is a part of Decatur House Collection. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and Decatur House now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Celestial Globe, Decatur House Collection
    W. & T. M. Bardin
    furnishings
    This celestial globe was created by William and Thomas Marriott Bardin (professionally known as W. & T. M. Bardin) circa 1800 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The globe is made of wood, brass, and glass and set on a three-legged wooden stand. There is a round compass at the juncture of the stretchers and the sphere and stand both have the months and zodiac names on it. The globe captures the position of stars observed in 1800 by Dr. William Hershel and is dedicated to Rev. Nevil Maskelyne, astronomer royal. This globe is one of a pair in the Decatur House Collection. The other is a terrestrial globe. It is believed these globes are part of the 1820 estate inventory of Decatur House. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and Decatur House now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Presentation Sword and Scabbard, Decatur House Collection
    William Rose
    Unknown
    furnishings
    swords
    This sword and scabbard was presented to Commodore Stephen Decatur by the Commonwealth of Virginia following his capture of the Macedonia on October 25, 1812. The blade was created in Philadelphia by William Rose and features an ivory and parcel-gilt hilt topped with a cast eagle, silver gilt plate, and brass stripes on the edges, and inlaid with gold foliage and silver lettering. An inscription on the blade reads, “In testimony of the splendid naval talents and valor displayed by Commodore Stephen Decatur commanding the United States Frigate UNITED STATES in the capture of the English Frigate MACEDONIA 25th, October 1812.” The scabbard is made of gilt silver with cast-applied nautical decorations. This presentation sword and scabbard are a part of the collection at Decatur House. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and Decatur House now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Mirrored Wall Sconce, Greeen Room
    Samuel McIntire
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This mahogany mirrored wall sconce was likely created by American craftsman Samuel McIntire around 1800. McIntire is attributed with creating this sconce, and it's twin, due to the skilled craftsmanship and design. The sconce is seen here on the west wall of the Green Room, in a photograph by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes in January 1972, during the administration of Richard M. Nixon.
  • Mirrored Wall Sconce, Greeen Room
    Samuel McIntire
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This mahogany mirrored wall sconce was likely created by American craftsman Samuel McIntire around 1800. McIntire is attributed with creating this sconce, and it's twin, due to the skilled craftsmanship and design. The sconce is seen here on the west wall of the Green Room, in a photograph by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes in January 1972, during the administration of Richard M. Nixon.
  • Convex Girandole Mirror, Green Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This convex girandole mirror with wall sconces was made circa 1820 in New York. The wooden frame features carvings of a large American eagle at the top and a smaller British lion at the base. The wood has been gilded with two candle sconces on either end of the base. The creator is unknown. The girandole is captured in the Green Room in a photograph taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. It was added to the White House Collection in 1971.
  • Convex Girandole Mirror, Green Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This convex girandole mirror with wall sconces was made circa 1820 in New York. The wooden frame features carvings of a large American eagle at the top and a smaller British lion at the base. The wood has been gilded with two candle sconces on either end of the base. The creator is unknown. The girandole is captured in the Green Room in a photograph taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. It was added to the White House Collection in 1971.
  • Convex Girandole Mirror, Green Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This convex girandole mirror with wall sconces was made circa 1820 in New York. The wooden frame features carvings of a large American eagle at the top and a smaller British lion at the base. The wood has been gilded with two candle sconces on either end of the base. The creator is unknown. The girandole is captured in the Green Room in a photograph taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. It was added to the White House Collection in 1971.
  • Convex Girandole Mirror, Green Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This convex girandole mirror with wall sconces was made circa 1820 in New York. The wooden frame features carvings of a large American eagle at the top and a smaller British lion at the base. The wood has been gilded with two candle sconces on either end of the base. The creator is unknown. The girandole is captured in the Green Room in a photograph taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. It was added to the White House Collection in 1971.
  • Convex Girandole Mirror, Green Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This convex girandole mirror with wall sconces was made circa 1820 in New York. The wooden frame features carvings of a large American eagle at the top and a smaller British lion at the base. The wood has been gilded with two candle sconces on either end of the base. The creator is unknown. The girandole is captured in the Green Room in a photograph taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. It was added to the White House Collection in 1971.
  • Convex Girandole Mirror, Green Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This convex girandole mirror with wall sconces was made circa 1820 in New York. The wooden frame features carvings of a large American eagle at the top and a smaller British lion at the base. The wood has been gilded with two candle sconces on either end of the base. The creator is unknown. The girandole is captured in the Green Room in a photograph taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. It was added to the White House Collection in 1971.
  • Federal Period Mirror, White House Collection
    Unknown
    mirror
    Family Dining Room
    State Floor
    This 19th century mirror was donated to the White House Collection in 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration. The convex gilt mirror was made in the Federal style and features a carved bald eagle above the mirror glass. The piece was likely made in New York. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the mirror in August 1965 in the Family Dining Room, seen reflected in the mirror. At the time, the mirror hung above the room's green and white marble mantelpiece.
  • Federal Period Mirror, White House Collection
    Unknown
    mirror
    Family Dining Room
    State Floor
    This 19th century mirror was donated to the White House Collection in 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration. The convex gilt mirror was made in the Federal style and features a carved bald eagle above the mirror glass. The piece was likely made in New York. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the mirror in August 1965 in the Family Dining Room, seen reflected in the mirror. At the time, the mirror hung above the room's green and white marble mantelpiece.
  • Convex Mirror, Red Room
    Unknown
    Red Room
    mirror
    State Floor
    This convex mirror, made in the early 19th century, remains a part of the White House furnishings. In this photograph, the mirror is hanging in the Red Room and reflects the furnishings and fireplace in the ornate room during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Hiawatha's Boat, White House Collection (Detail)
    Gorham Manufacturing Company
    silver
    This image shows the detail of Hiawatha's Boat, a silver and mirror centerpiece made by Gorham Manufacturing Company of Providence, Rhode Island, in 1871. First Lady Julia Grant purchased the centerpiece, which the artist based on the Henry Wadsworth Longfellow poem The Song of Hiawatha, at the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  • Hiawatha's Boat, White House Collection (Detail)
    Gorham Manufacturing Company
    silver
    This image shows the detail of Hiawatha's Boat, a silver and mirror centerpiece made by Gorham Manufacturing Company of Providence, Rhode Island, in 1871. First Lady Julia Grant purchased the centerpiece, which the artist based on the Henry Wadsworth Longfellow poem The Song of Hiawatha, at the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  • Bellange Chair, White House Collection
    Pierre-Antoine Bellange
    chair
    This gilded beechwood armchair is part of the 53-piece suite of Pierre-Antoine Bellange furniture that future president James Monroe purchased while serving as United States minister to France and later brought with him to the White House. Many pieces remain in the White House Collection. This particular chair is upholstered in fabric inspired by the chair's original crimson upholstery.
  • Hiawatha's Boat, White House Collection (Detail)
    Gorham Manufacturing Company
    silver
    This image shows the detail of Hiawatha's Boat, a silver and mirror centerpiece made by Gorham Manufacturing Company of Providence, Rhode Island, in 1871. First Lady Julia Grant purchased the centerpiece, which the artist based on the Henry Wadsworth Longfellow poem The Song of Hiawatha, at the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  • Wine Bottle Holder, White House Collection
    Unknown
    silver
    This silver-plated wine bottle holder was created circa 1904 in Connecticut. The wine bottle holder was used by White House staff to serve guests at dinners hosted by the president and first lady. Suz Redfearn photographed the wine bottle holder on November 19, 2018.
  • Mantel Clock, White House Collection (Detail)
    Unknown
    clock
    This detailed closeup is of a black marble and malachite mantel clock. The clock has three dials (clock, calendar, and barometer) and a thermometer and was made in France. It was purchased from retailer Browne & Spaulding of New York City for the mantelpiece in the Cabinet Room during the Ulysses S. Grant administration. Until the construction of the West Wing in 1902, the Cabinet Room was on the east end of the Second Floor in the Executive Mansion.
  • Bellange Chair, White House Collection
    Pierre-Antoine Bellange
    chair
    This gilded beechwood armchair is part of the 53-piece suite of Pierre-Antoine Bellange furniture that future president James Monroe purchased while serving as United States minister to France and later brought with him to the White House. Many pieces remain in the White House Collection. This particular chair is upholstered in fabric inspired by the chair's original crimson upholstery.
  • Bellange Chair, White House Collection
    Pierre-Antoine Bellange
    chair
    This gilded beechwood armchair is part of the 53-piece suite of Pierre-Antoine Bellange furniture that future president James Monroe purchased while serving as United States minister to France and later brought with him to the White House. Many pieces remain in the White House Collection. This particular chair is upholstered in fabric inspired by the chair's original crimson upholstery.
  • Wine Bottle Holder, White House Collection
    Unknown
    silver
    This silver-plated wine bottle holder was created circa 1904 in Connecticut. The wine bottle holder was used by White House staff to serve guests at dinners hosted by the president and first lady. Suz Redfearn photographed the wine bottle holder on November 19, 2018.
  • Mantel Clock, White House Collection (Detail)
    Unknown
    clock
    This detailed closeup is of a black marble and malachite mantel clock. The clock has three dials (clock, calendar, and barometer) and a thermometer and was made in France. It was purchased from retailer Browne & Spaulding of New York City for the mantelpiece in the Cabinet Room during the Ulysses S. Grant administration. Until the construction of the West Wing in 1902, the Cabinet Room was on the east end of the Second Floor in the Executive Mansion.