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  • Green Room, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Green Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of the west wall of the Green Room was taken in January 1972 during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. At the top of the wall is the 1767 London portrait of Benjamin Franklin painted by Scottish artist David Martin. It was the first significant work of art attained by First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy's Special Committee in 1962. Below this portrait hangs "Philadelphia in 1858", painted by Ferdinand Richardt. The left and right sides of this painting are surrounded by twin mahogany mirrored wall sconces. The Green Room is located on the State Floor of the Executive Mansion. It was the first room named after the color of its textiles and has Federal style furnishings. The elegant but relaxed parlor is used for small gatherings, interviews, and teas.
  • Arrival Ceremony for President Pompidou of France
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    military
    State Visit
    South Lawn
    Head of State
    This photograph by Joseph J. Scherschel shows part of the arrival ceremony for President Georges Pompidou of France on February 24, 1970, whose visit occurred during the Richard M. Nixon administration. The two presidents can be seen on stage on the South Lawn of the White House Grounds. Pompidou's trip to the United States started on February 23, 1970 and ended on March 3, 1970. Prominent in the photograph are members of the military ceremonial guard who are present at arrival ceremonies.
  • Grand Staircase, Nixon Administration
    Nelson Brown
    Victor Boswell
    Robert S. Oakes
    Grand Staircase
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Grand Staircase was taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. The Grand Staircase connects the Second Floor and family quarters of the White House with the State Floor and Entrance Hall below. During official occasions such as State Dinners, the president descends the staircase with honored guests while the United States Marine Band plays "Hail to the Chief." There have been five Grand Staircases since the White House was built, including two located in this alcove. The first was built during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovations. The second, seen here, during the Harry S. Truman renovations of 1948-1952. Truman took particular interest to redesign the staircase into the two long, descending sets of stairs.
  • Dinner in Honor of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    event
    White House Guests
    State Floor
    Entrance Hall
    entertainment
    music
    In this photograph, guests dance and mingle in the Entrance Hall following a dinner held in honor of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor on April 4, 1970. President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon hosted the formal dinner in the State Dining Room, that included after-dinner entertainment in the East Room by singer and pianist Bobby Short and singing troupe the Young Saints. In this photograph, Julie Nixon Eisenhower can be seen near the North Door, speaking with her parents' dinner guests.
  • Dinner in Honor of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    event
    White House Guests
    State Floor
    Entrance Hall
    press
    In this photograph, taken by Joseph J. Scherschel of National Geographic on April 4, 1970, members of the press, including Helen Thomas at right, gather around a Steinway piano in the Entrance Hall during a dinner hosted by President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon in honor of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. The grand piano was gifted to President Franklin D. Roosevelt at a ceremony on December 10, 1938 on behalf of the Steinway family. The 300,000th Steinway piano, it was built to replace another Steinway which had been given to the White House in 1903. Visible on the wall behind the guests is the official portrait of President Grover Cleveland, who served two non-consecutive terms as president from from 1885-1889, then from 1893-1897. The oil on canvas portrait was painted by Eastman Johnson in 1891.
  • Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps Perform for Queen Elizabeth II
    Joseph H. Bailey
    music
    military
    State Visit
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    Head of State
    Arrival Ceremony
    This photograph of President George H. W. Bush and Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain watching the Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps perform on the South Lawn was taken by Joseph H. Bailey on May 14, 1991 during an Arrival Ceremony held in The Queen's honor. On the right side of the reviewing stand are Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh and First Lady Barbara Bush. The Bushes also honored her visit with a State Dinner in the evening. Queen Elizabeth's visit was the start of a 13 day tour of the United States.
  • Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps Perform for Queen Elizabeth II
    Joseph H. Bailey
    music
    military
    State Visit
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    Head of State
    Arrival Ceremony
    This photograph of President George H. W. Bush and Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain watching the Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps perform on the South Lawn was taken by Joseph H. Bailey on May 14, 1991 during an Arrival Ceremony held in The Queen's honor. On the right side of the reviewing stand are Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh and First Lady Barbara Bush. The Bushes also honored her visit with a State Dinner in the evening. Queen Elizabeth's visit was the start of a 13 day tour of the United States.
  • Gift Exchange Between President Bush and Queen Elizabeth II
    Joseph H. Bailey
    State Visit
    Head of State
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph was taken at the gift exchange between President George H. W. Bush and Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain on May 14, 1991 in the Rose Garden of the White House. Queen Elizabeth presented President Bush with a set of silver-plated horseshoes and a leather bound version of "America Is Lost," a copy of the essay written in 1782 by King George III analyzing the causes and the effects of the American Revolution. President and First Lady Barbara Bush gifted Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, a Steuben crystal flower bowl engraved with quotations from William Shakespeare and a framed print of an 1878 newspaper illustration depicting four horses pulling a carriage through Newark. The Bushes also honored The Queen with an Arrival Ceremony earlier in the day and a State Dinner in the evening. The Queen's visit was the start of a 13 day tour of the United States.
  • Planting of the Queen Elizabeth II Little-Leaf Linden Tree
    Joseph H. Bailey
    tree planting
    State Visit
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    Head of State
    press
    This photograph of press gathered at the little-leaf linden tree planting ceremony was taken by Joseph H. Bailey on May 14, 1991. The tree was planted by Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain and President George H. W. Bush on the South Lawn of the White House Grounds to replace one that was felled by a storm. The original was planted in 1937 in order to honor the ascension of King George VI, Queen Elizabeth's father, to the throne. Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh and First Lady Barbara Bush were also present at the ceremony. The Bushes honored Queen Elizabeth with an Arrival Ceremony earlier in the day and a State Dinner in the evening. Queen Elizabeth's visit was the start of a 13 day tour of the United States.
  • Gift Exchange Between President Bush and Queen Elizabeth II
    Joseph H. Bailey
    State Visit
    Head of State
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph was taken at the gift exchange between President George H. W. Bush and Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain on May 14, 1991 in the Rose Garden of the White House. Queen Elizabeth presented President Bush with a set of silver-plated horseshoes and a leather bound version of "America Is Lost," a copy of the essay written in 1782 by King George III analyzing the causes and the effects of the American Revolution. President and First Lady Barbara Bush gifted Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, a Steuben crystal flower bowl engraved with quotations from William Shakespeare and a framed print of an 1878 newspaper illustration depicting four horses pulling a carriage through Newark. The Bushes also honored The Queen with an Arrival Ceremony earlier in the day and a State Dinner in the evening. The Queen's visit was the start of a 13 day tour of the United States.
  • Eggatha at the Egg Hunt, 1982 Easter Egg Roll
    Dave Johnson
    holidays
    children
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    Easter Egg Roll
    In this photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Dave Johnson on April 12, 1982, "Eggatha," a costumed character, helps out in the straw-covered pen during the egg hunt held as part of the White House Easter Egg Roll. At the egg hunt, children discovered approximately 8,000 souvenir eggs. President Reagan had introduced souvenir wooden eggs to White House Easter egg hunts a year earlier. They have since become an anticipated keepsake.
  • The 1982 White House Easter Egg Roll
    Dave Johnson
    holidays
    children
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    Easter Egg Roll
    In this photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Dave Johnson on April 12, 1982, a child participates in an Easter egg rolling contest during the White House Easter Egg Roll. While egg rolling games have been part of the White House Easter Egg Roll since it was first held in 1878, egg roll racing was added to the event in 1974 by First Lady Pat Nixon.
  • Aerial View of the White House, Reagan Administration
    Dave Johnson
    south view
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    This aerial photograph of the South Grounds of the White House was taken in July 1982 by Dave Johnson during the administration of Ronald Reagan. This photograph captures the South Lawn and a glimpse of the fountain.
  • Behind-the-Scenes of Tricia Nixon's "60 Minutes" Tour
    James E. Russell
    Second Floor
    East Sitting Hall
    press
    First Family
    This behind-the-scenes photograph of Tricia Nixon's "60 Minutes" tour of the White House was taken on May 26, 1970 by James E. Russell. Nixon, the eldest daughter of President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon, guided reporters Harry Reasoner and Mike Wallace through the living quarters used by the First Family, including rooms not often seen by the public. In this photograph, Nixon is seen in the East Sitting Hall, located on the Second Floor, during filming.
  • Behind-the-Scenes of Tricia Nixon's "60 Minutes" Tour
    James E. Russell
    press
    Second Floor
    Center Hall
    First Family
    This behind-the-scenes photograph of Tricia Nixon's "60 Minutes" tour of the White House was taken on May 26, 1970 by James E. Russell. Nixon, the eldest daughter of President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon, guided reporters Harry Reasoner and Mike Wallace through the living quarters used by the First Family, including rooms not often seen by the public. In this photograph, Nixon is seen in the Center Hall with members of "60 Minutes" crew, including Reasoner.
  • Behind-the-Scenes of Tricia Nixon's "60 Minutes" Tour
    James E. Russell
    press
    Truman Balcony
    Second Floor
    First Family
    This behind-the-scenes photograph of Tricia Nixon's "60 Minutes" tour of the White House was taken on May 26, 1970 by James E. Russell. Nixon, the eldest daughter of President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon, guided reporters Harry Reasoner and Mike Wallace through the living quarters used by the First Family, including rooms not often seen by the public. In this photograph, Nixon is seen showing Wallace and Reasoner the Truman Balcony.
  • South View, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    south view
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    This photograph of the South Fountain was taken in July 1982 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Ronald Reagan. Installed in the 1850s, the South Fountain was the first ornamental water fountain on the White House Grounds. However, it was constructed poorly and was replaced in 1876. In this photograph, the South Portico of the White House can be seen beyond the South Lawn.
  • Magnolia Trees Outside East Wing Entrance
    David R. Bridge
    East Wing
    east view
    flower
    This photograph was taken outside the entrance to the East Wing in March 1972 by David R. Bridge, during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. Built in 1942, during the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration, the East Wing originally housed wartime offices. President Roosevelt had intentions of eventually using the space as a museum for White House artifacts. Since the 1940s, the East Wing has also been used by first ladies, with First Lady Rosalynn Carter officially establishing the Office of the First Lady in 1977. This entrance, located directly across the driveway from the columns, leads to the East Wing Lobby and serves as the primary visitor entrance into the White House.
  • Jacqueline Kennedy Garden, Nixon Administration
    David R. Bridge
    staff
    Jacqueline Kennedy Garden
    This photograph of the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden was taken in March 1972 by David R. Bridge during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. With the Magnolia trees bloom, an unidentified woman, possibly a member of the White House staff, walks along the pebble path that surrounds the garden. The pergola was designed by I.M. Pei in 1965.
  • Lincoln Bedroom, Ford Administration
    Larry D. Kinney
    Second Floor
    Lincoln Bedroom
    This photograph of the Lincoln Bedroom was taken in August 1976 by Larry D. Kinney during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. Located on the Second Floor of the White House, in modern times the Lincoln Bedroom is used for official and personal guests of the president’s family. In the past, it served as an office and the Cabinet Room. The room became a bedroom in the family quarters during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovation. The high-back bed, known as the Lincoln Bed, was purchased for the White House by First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln. While it was purchased during the Lincoln administration, the bed was probably never used by President Abraham Lincoln, nor was it originally placed in this room. Repurposed during the administration of President Harry S. Truman, the room features furniture, artwork, and refurbishing reminiscent of the 1860s. In 2005, the room underwent refurbishing under the direction of First Lady Laura Bush, enhancing the historical accuracy of the room.
  • Lincoln Bedroom, Ford Administration
    Larry D. Kinney
    Second Floor
    Lincoln Bedroom
    This photograph of the Lincoln Bedroom was taken in August 1976 by Larry D. Kinney during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. Located on the Second Floor of the White House, in modern times the Lincoln Bedroom is used for official and personal guests of the president’s family. In the past, it served as an office and the Cabinet Room. The room became a bedroom in the family quarters during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovation. The high-back bed, known as the Lincoln Bed, was purchased for the White House by First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln. While it was purchased during the Lincoln administration, the bed was probably never used by President Abraham Lincoln, nor was it originally placed in this room. Repurposed during the administration of President Harry S. Truman, the room features furniture, artwork, and refurbishing reminiscent of the 1860s. In 2005, the room underwent refurbishing under the direction of First Lady Laura Bush, enhancing the historical accuracy of the room.
  • Lincoln Bedroom, Ford Administration
    Larry D. Kinney
    Second Floor
    Lincoln Bedroom
    This photograph of the Lincoln Bedroom was taken in August 1976 by Larry D. Kinney during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. Located on the Second Floor of the White House, in modern times the Lincoln Bedroom is used for official and personal guests of the president’s family. In the past, it served as an office and the Cabinet Room. The room became a bedroom in the family quarters during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovation. The high-back bed, known as the Lincoln Bed, was purchased for the White House by First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln. While it was purchased during the Lincoln administration, the bed was probably never used by President Abraham Lincoln, nor was it originally placed in this room. Repurposed during the administration of President Harry S. Truman, the room features furniture, artwork, and refurbishing reminiscent of the 1860s. In 2005, the room underwent refurbishing under the direction of First Lady Laura Bush, enhancing the historical accuracy of the room.
  • Lincoln Bedroom, Ford Administration
    Larry D. Kinney
    Second Floor
    Lincoln Bedroom
    This photograph of the Lincoln Bedroom was taken in August 1976 by Larry D. Kinney during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. Located on the Second Floor of the White House, in modern times the Lincoln Bedroom is used for official and personal guests of the president’s family. In the past, it served as an office and the Cabinet Room. The room became a bedroom in the family quarters during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovation. The high-back bed, known as the Lincoln Bed, was purchased for the White House by First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln. While it was purchased during the Lincoln administration, the bed was probably never used by President Abraham Lincoln, nor was it originally placed in this room. Repurposed during the administration of President Harry S. Truman, the room features furniture, artwork, and refurbishing reminiscent of the 1860s. In 2005, the room underwent refurbishing under the direction of First Lady Laura Bush, enhancing the historical accuracy of the room.
  • Lincoln Bedroom, Ford Administration
    Larry D. Kinney
    Second Floor
    Lincoln Bedroom
    This photograph of the Lincoln Bedroom was taken in August 1976 by Larry D. Kinney during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. Located on the Second Floor of the White House, in modern times the Lincoln Bedroom is used for official and personal guests of the president’s family. In the past, it served as an office and the Cabinet Room. The room became a bedroom in the family quarters during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovation. The high-back bed, known as the Lincoln Bed, was purchased for the White House by First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln. While it was purchased during the Lincoln administration, the bed was probably never used by President Abraham Lincoln, nor was it originally placed in this room. Repurposed during the administration of President Harry S. Truman, the room features furniture, artwork, and refurbishing reminiscent of the 1860s. In 2005, the room underwent refurbishing under the direction of First Lady Laura Bush, enhancing the historical accuracy of the room.
  • Lincoln Bedroom, Ford Administration
    Larry D. Kinney
    Second Floor
    Lincoln Bedroom
    This photograph of the Lincoln Bedroom was taken in August 1976 by Larry D. Kinney during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. Located on the Second Floor of the White House, in modern times the Lincoln Bedroom is used for official and personal guests of the president’s family. In the past, it served as an office and the Cabinet Room. The room became a bedroom in the family quarters during the 1902 Theodore Roosevelt renovation. The high-back bed, known as the Lincoln Bed, was purchased for the White House by First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln. While it was purchased during the Lincoln administration, the bed was probably never used by President Abraham Lincoln, nor was it originally placed in this room. Repurposed during the administration of President Harry S. Truman, the room features furniture, artwork, and refurbishing reminiscent of the 1860s. In 2005, the room underwent refurbishing under the direction of First Lady Laura Bush, enhancing the historical accuracy of the room.