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  • View of the East Front of the President's House, with the Addition of the North and South Porticos
    Benjamin Henry Latrobe
    plans
    east view
    North Portico
    South Portico
    This elevation drawing was created by Benjamin Henry Latrobe in 1807. The architectural drawing shows an east view of the White House, with guests entering and departing the house from the proposed North and South Porticos. The North and South Porticos were not part of James Hoban's original 1792 design for the White House. Although this drawing anticipates the prominent use of columns on the North Portico (completed ca. 1829-1820) and South Portico (completed 1824), it does not reflect the appearance of the North and South Porticos as they were constructed.
  • Photographer Captures White House from Firetruck Ladder
    George F. Mobley
    Bates Littlehales
    north view
    Lafayette Park
    In this photograph from May 1962, a photographer, possibly George F. Mobley of the National Geographic Service, ascends the ladder of a firetruck parked on Pennsylvania Avenue to capture an aerial view of the White House. The photo session was for the cover of the fourth edition of "The White House: An Historic Guide" a publication released by the White House Historical Association that serves a companion book for tours of the White House, providing history of the rooms, architecture, and furniture. This photograph was taken from Lafayette Square, just north of the White House.
  • Aerial View of Washington, D.C.
    Robert L. Knudsen
    Washington, D.C.
    Washington Monument
    National Mall
    National Park
    This photograph taken on April 21, 1962 by Robert L. Knudsen depicts aerial views of Washington, D. C., showing parts of the city during the John F. Kennedy administration. At the time, Washington Monument was separated from the Lincoln Memorial by the “tempos” —temporary buildings—erected during World War II. The foreground features the Smithsonian Institution's Castle, Arts and Industries Building, National Museum of Natural History, and the construction site of the Museum of History and Technology, which was renamed the National Museum of American History in 1980.
  • Aerial View of Washington, D.C.
    Robert L. Knudsen
    Washington, D.C.
    National Mall
    National Park
    This photograph taken on April 21, 1962, by Robert L. Knudsen depicts aerial views of Washington, D. C. showing parts of the city during the John F. Kennedy administration. The White House is visible toward the upper right corner of the picture. The foreground features the Smithsonian Institution's Castle, Arts and Industries Building, National Museum of Natural History, and the construction site of the Museum of History and Technology, which was renamed the National Museum of American History in 1980.
  • Visitors Sign at the East Entrance
    Robert L. Knudsen
    East Entrance
    east view
    This photograph is of the sign at the visitors' entrance where tourists queued for public tours. The image was taken by Robert Knudsen on February 8, 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Rose Garden, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    west view
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    West Colonnade
    This photograph of the Rose Garden was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on July 13, 1962, during the John F. Kennedy administration. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment. This photograph shows the Rose Garden after Rachel Lambert Mellon oversaw its installation.
  • View from Window over the North Entrance
    Jack E. Boucher
    White House
    Lafayette Park
    This color photograph by Jack E. Boucher was taken from inside the White House through the window above the north entrance. The fountain on the North Lawn and Lafayette Square can both be seen through the North Portico columns. Boucher served as chief photographer for the National Park Service's Historic American Buildings Survey. He spent four decades documenting hundreds of historic buildings, including the White House.
  • Photographer Captures White House from Firetruck Ladder
    George F. Mobley
    Bates Littlehales
    north view
    In this photograph from May 1962, a photographer, possibly George F. Mobley of the National Geographic Service, ascends the ladder of a firetruck parked on Pennsylvania Avenue to capture an aerial view of the White House. The photo session was for the cover of the fourth edition of "The White House: An Historic Guide," a publication released by the White House Historical Association that serves a companion book for tours of the White House, providing history of the rooms, architecture, and furniture.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1982, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • View of the Ellipse from the Washington Monument, NW, Washington, D.C.
    Carol M. Highsmith
    Washington, D.C.
    Ellipse
    aerial view
    This photograph of the Washington, D.C. skyline was taken by Carol M. Highsmith in 2010. Highsmith took the photograph from atop the Washington Monument, looking north toward the Ellipse and White House. The South Lawn and South Portico of the White House is visible just north of the Ellipse.
  • Washington Nationals Play Baseball at Swampoodle Grounds
    Unknown
    Washington, D.C.
    sports
    This photograph of the Washington Nationals baseball team was taken between 1886-1889. The team is seen playing on Swampoodle Grounds, also known as Capitol Park and later the location of Union Station, in northeast Washington, D.C. On August 30, 1865 the Nationals and the Brooklyn Atlantics became the first organized sports teams to visit a president in the White House when they visited President Andrew Johnson following a competition on the White Lot. The White Lot, later known as the Ellipse, was located south of the White House.
  • President Hoover Views Fire Damage
    Harris & Ewing
    construction & maintenance
    disasters
    This photograph, taken on January 15, 1930, shows President Herbert Hoover walking past debris and workers repairing fire damage to the West Wing. On the evening of December 24, 1929, the West Wing caught fire, requiring the efforts of 130 firefighters to extinguish the powerful, four-alarm blaze. The fire started when pamphlets in the attic ignited, likely caused by a blocked or faulty chimney vent or defective electric wiring. Following repairs, President Herbert Hoover and his aides returned to the West Wing on April 14, 1930.
  • Engineers Inspect Fire Damage
    Harris & Ewing
    construction & maintenance
    disasters
    This photograph, taken in January 1930, shows engineers inspecting for fire damage on the roof of the White House. On the evening of December 24, 1929, the West Wing caught fire, requiring the efforts of 130 firefighters to extinguish the powerful, four-alarm blaze. The fire started when pamphlets in the attic ignited, likely caused by a blocked or faulty chimney vent or defective electric wiring. Following repairs, President Herbert Hoover and his aides returned to the West Wing on April 14, 1930.
  • South View, Gerald R. Ford Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    south view
    South Portico
    South Lawn
    This photograph of the south view of the White House was taken in July 1975 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. The South Portico and South Lawn are visible.
  • South View, Gerald R. Ford Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    south view
    South Portico
    South Lawn
    This photograph of the south view of the White House was taken in July 1975 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. The South Portico and South Lawn are visible.
  • South View, Gerald R. Ford Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    south view
    South Portico
    This photograph of the south view of the White House was taken in July 1975 by Joseph H. Bailey during the administration of Gerald R. Ford. Bailey captured South Portico from the viewpoint of the South Lawn.