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  • Theodore Roosevelt
    Tadé Styka
    portrait
    This painting of Theodore Roosevelt was painted by Polish artist Tadé Styka circa 1909. Styka depicts Roosevelt during his time with the Rough Riders, a volunteer cavalry unit that Roosevelt led during the Spanish-American War. The painting later hung in the Roosevelt Room of the White House. A former governor of New York, Roosevelt became president upon the assassination of William McKinley, on September 14, 1901 and served until March 4, 1909. This painting was acquired for the White House Collection by the White House Historical Association in 1974.
  • Theodore Roosevelt
    Tadé Styka
    portrait
    This painting of Theodore Roosevelt was painted by Polish artist Tadé Styka circa 1909. Styka depicts Roosevelt during his time with the Rough Riders, a volunteer cavalry unit that Roosevelt led during the Spanish-American War. The painting later hung in the Roosevelt Room of the White House. A former governor of New York, Roosevelt became president upon the assassination of William McKinley, on September 14, 1901 and served until March 4, 1909. This painting was acquired for the White House Collection by the White House Historical Association in 1974.
  • Lady Bird Johnson
    Elizabeth Shoumatoff
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Lady Bird Johnson was painted by Elizabeth Shoumatoff. Mrs. Johnson graduated from the University of Texas with a degree in journalism. During her life prior to the White House, her business acumen meant she became the first First Lady to be a millionaire in her own right. As First Lady, she spearheaded beautification projects spanning cities and highways and initiated several firsts for her office. She was the first to have a press secretary and chief of staff, as well as the first to do a solo tour to campaign for major policy issues, such as the Civil Rights Act. Her husband, Lyndon Johnson, served as president from November 22, 1963 until January 20, 1969.
  • Alexander Hamilton
    John Trumbull
    portrait
    Cabinet
    This portrait of Alexander Hamilton, the first secretary of treasury, was painted by John Trumbull and was completed circa 1805. Trumbull, who had served as personal aide to Gen. George Washington during the Revolutionary War, painted numerous portraits which are in the White House Collection. Four of his paintings adorn the walls of the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C. Hamilton was an influential figure in the early years of the United States and died following a famous duel with Vice President Aaron Burr. This portrait was photographed by Bates Littlehales in 1962 and captures the frame that housed the painting around the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Alexander Hamilton
    John Trumbull
    portrait
    Cabinet
    This portrait of Alexander Hamilton, the first secretary of treasury, was painted by John Trumbull and was completed circa 1805. Trumbull, who had served as personal aide to Gen. George Washington during the Revolutionary War, painted numerous portraits which are in the White House Collection. Four of his paintings adorn the walls of the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C. Hamilton was an influential figure in the early years of the United States and died following a famous duel with Vice President Aaron Burr. This portrait was photographed by Bates Littlehales in 1962 and captures the frame that housed the painting around the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Alexander Hamilton
    John Trumbull
    portrait
    Cabinet
    This portrait of Alexander Hamilton, the first secretary of treasury, was painted by John Trumbull and was completed circa 1805. Trumbull, who had served as personal aide to Gen. George Washington during the Revolutionary War, painted numerous portraits which are in the White House Collection. Four of his paintings adorn the walls of the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C. Hamilton was an influential figure in the early years of the United States and died following a famous duel with Vice President Aaron Burr. This portrait was photographed by Bates Littlehales in 1962 and captures the frame that housed the painting around the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Alexander Hamilton
    John Trumbull
    portrait
    Cabinet
    This portrait of Alexander Hamilton, the first secretary of treasury, was painted by John Trumbull and was completed circa 1805. Trumbull, who had served as personal aide to Gen. George Washington during the Revolutionary War, painted numerous portraits which are in the White House Collection. Four of his paintings adorn the walls of the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C. Hamilton was an influential figure in the early years of the United States and died following a famous duel with Vice President Aaron Burr. This portrait was photographed by Bates Littlehales in 1962 and captures the frame that housed the painting around the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Donald Trump
    Shealah Craighead
    portrait
    This photograph is the official portrait of President Donald Trump. Trump, a former real estate magnate and reality television personality, was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States on January 20, 2017.
  • Mamie Doud Eisenhower
    Thomas Edgar Stevens
    official portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Mamie Eisenhower was painted by Thomas Edgar Stevens. As first lady, Mrs. Eisenhower was an active hostess and entertained more heads of state and leaders of foreign governments than her predecessors. Her husband served as president from January 20, 1953 until January 20, 1961.
  • Theodore Roosevelt
    John Singer Sargent
    official portrait
    This portrait of Theodore Roosevelt was painted by renowned artist John Singer Sargent in 1903. Architect Charles McKim, who oversaw major renovations to the White House occurring at the time, invited Sargent to paint Roosevelt's portrait. Though the artist later complained that Roosevelt would agree to only short sittings, the president was very pleased with the end result. On February 19 he wrote in a letter to his son Kermit, noting that "This afternoon I had my last sitting with Mr. Sargent. I like his picture enormously." A former governor of New York, Roosevelt became president upon the assassination of William McKinley, on September 14, 1901 and served until March 4, 1909.
  • George Washington
    Gilbert Stuart
    official portrait
    This full-length portrait of George Washington was painted by Gilbert Stuart in 1797, the final year of his presidency. While other artists had depicted Washington as a military leader, Stuart became the first portraitist to paint an authoritative image of Washington as the country's first president. Washington holds a sword in his left hand, alluding to his past military service, but appears in civilian clothes, emphasizing the fact that he had resigned his commission as a military leader. A book entitled Constitution and Laws of the United States leans against the table leg. The portrait was installed in the White House in November 1800. During the War of 1812, First Lady Dolley Madison famously saved the portrait from near-certain demise. Before vacating the premises on August 24, 1814, Mrs. Madison ordered that official papers and the Washington portrait should be saved from British hands. The painting returned to the White House after it was rebuilt in 1817. Washington served as the Commander in Chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolution. The first president was in office from April 30, 1789 until March 4, 1797.
  • Woodrow Wilson
    F. Graham Cootes
    official portrait
    This portrait of President Woodrow Wilson was painted by Frank Graham Cootes, professionally known as F. Graham Cootes, and is Wilson's official presidential portrait. Wilson was president of his alma mater, Princeton University, from 1902-1910, when he was elected governor of New Jersey. He served as president from March 4, 1913 until March 4, 1921.
  • Ronald Wilson Reagan
    Everett Raymond Kinstler
    official portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of President Ronald Reagan was painted by Everett Raymond Kinstler in 1991. Reagan served as governor of California from 1967-1975 and was president from January 20, 1981 until January 20, 1989. Kinstler began his career drawing comic books and illustrations for books and magazines before becoming a portraitist renowned for his paintings of famous entertainers, politicians, authors, and justices of the Supreme Court. Kinstler has painted portraits of Lady Bird Johnson, Betty Ford, Jimmy Carter, Richard M. Nixon, George H. W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush. His portraits of Reagan, seen here, and Gerald R. Ford, are official presidential portraits.
  • Martha Dandridge Custis Washington
    Unknown
    portrait
    This painting, from the late 19th century, is of Martha Washington, wife of President George Washington. During President Washington's administration (1789-1797), Mrs. Washington is said to have created an atmosphere of warm hospitality in the temporary capitals of New York and Philadelphia despite her dislike of formal affairs and society.
  • Ulysses Simpson Grant
    Thomas Le Clear
    portrait
    This painting, by Thomas Le Clear circa 1881, is of President Ulysses S. Grant. Prior to his presidency, Grant was a Civil War military leader who became Commanding General of the United States in March of 1864. He served as president from March 4, 1869 until March 4, 1877. Le Clear was an American painter born in New York who spent a number of years in Buffalo and New York City before achieving fame as a portrait painter.
  • Margaret Taylor
    Bureau of National Literature and Art
    portrait
    This drawing of Margaret Taylor is from 1903, nearly 50 years after her death. No certain likeness of "Peggy" Smith Taylor survives. While her husband President Zachary Taylor was in office from March 4, 1849 until July 9, 1850, she made no formal public appearances. Her social activities were confined to meetings with family, special groups with her husband, and attendance at church services. In her place Mrs. Taylor sent her youngest daughter, Mary Elizabeth Taylor Bliss, to act as official White House hostess. The sudden death of her husband was devastating, and she never spoke of the White House again.
  • Julia Dent Grant
    Mathew Brady
    portrait
    This photograph, taken by Matthew Brady, is of First Lady Julia Dent Grant. She described her husband's years in the White House from March 4, 1869 until March 4, 1877, as "the happiest period" of her life. While her husband fought during the Civil War she did not shy away from the action herself, moving with him to different postings wanting to stay close to him. While First Lady she entertained often and lavishly, and following the end of his presidency, the couple took a trip around the world. She was one of the first First Ladies to write a memoir, but it went unpublished until 1975. She was buried in the famous Grant's Tomb in New York City alongside her husband.
  • Michelle Obama
    Joyce N. Boghosian
    official portrait
    This portrait of First Lady Michelle Obama was taken by White House photographer Joyce N. Boghosian during President Obama's first term, which began on January 20, 2009. Mrs. Obama holds degrees from Princeton University and a law degree from Harvard.
  • Woodrow Wilson
    Stephen Seymour Thomas
    portrait
    This portrait of Woodrow Wilson was one of three painted by American artist Stephen Seymour Thomas. Thomas painted this portrait in 1913, at the beginning of Wilson's presidency. Wilson had been governor of New Jersey and served as president from March 4, 1913 until March 4, 1921.
  • Andrew Jackson
    Clark Mills
    portrait
    This miniature white metal version of a life-size equestrian statue of Andrew Jackson was cast at the Philadelphia foundry of Cornelius and Baker in 1855. Sculptor Clark Mills designed the original statue, which has stood in Lafayette Park since 1853. Mills' popular statue was the first bronze equestrian statue cast in America, an ambitious project that took Mills six attempts to successfully complete. The statue depicts Jackson during his triumphal victory over the British at New Orleans on January 8, 1815, during the War of 1812. Jackson was president from March 4, 1829 until March 4, 1837. He had served in the House of Representatives and the Senate prior to his time in the White House.