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  • Bellangé Pier Table in Storage
    Robert L. Knudsen
    tables
    furniture
    restoration
    construction & maintenance
    This photograph of a pier table by Parisian cabinetmaker Pierre-Antoine Bellangé was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on April 7, 1961 in a storage area within the White House. The table was missing its marble top and glass mirror. It was restored to the French Empire style and moved to the Blue Room during the restoration of the White House overseen by First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. The table formed part of a suite ordered for the Blue Room by President James Monroe in 1817.
  • Chelsea Wall Clock, White House Collection
    Chelsea Clock Company
    furnishings
    clocks
    Ground Floor Corridor
    Ground Floor
    This wall clock was custom made by the Chelsea Clock Company of Chelsea, Massachusetts in 2020 and was a gift of the White House Historical Association to the White House Collection. The clock hangs in the Ground Floor Corridor of the White House above the doorway leading to the president’s elevator. The face of the clock features an eagle on the upper half that was inspired by the James Monroe state service. White House calligraphers did the hand-lettering and numbering on the dial including the inscription “The President’s House” on the lower half of the clock’s face.
  • Zuber et Cie Wallpaper in the President's Dining Room
    Robert L. Knudsen
    Second Floor
    President's Dining Room
    wallpaper
    refurbishment
    This photograph shows a portion of the wallpaper by Zuber et Cie in the President's Dining Room and was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on September 28, 1962, during the John F. Kennedy administration. The circa 1852 panoramic wallpaper is entitled "Views of the American War of Independence" and features events from the American Revolution against the backdrop of natural landmarks. First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy oversaw the installation of the wallpaper as part of her White House restoration project. The President's Dining Room is located on the Second Floor of the Executive Mansion in the northwest corner. The President's Dining Room was originally a bedroom referred to as the Prince of Wales Room after the 1860 visit of Edward Albert, Queen Victoria's son who would later become King Edward VII. It was not until the Kennedy administration that the room became the President's Dining Room and main eating room for the First Family.
  • Zuber et Cie Wallpaper in the President's Dining Room
    Robert L. Knudsen
    Second Floor
    President's Dining Room
    wallpaper
    refurbishment
    This photograph shows a portion of the wallpaper by Zuber et Cie in the President's Dining Room and was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on September 28, 1962, during the John F. Kennedy administration. The circa 1852 panoramic wallpaper is entitled "Views of the American War of Independence" and features events from the American Revolution against the backdrop of natural landmarks. First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy oversaw the installation of the wallpaper as part of her White House restoration project. The President's Dining Room is located on the Second Floor of the Executive Mansion in the northwest corner. The President's Dining Room was originally a bedroom referred to as the Prince of Wales Room after the 1860 visit of Edward Albert, Queen Victoria's son who would later become King Edward VII. It was not until the Kennedy administration that the room became the President's Dining Room and main eating room for the First Family.
  • Zuber et Cie Wallpaper in the President's Dining Room
    Robert L. Knudsen
    Second Floor
    President's Dining Room
    wallpaper
    refurbishment
    This photograph shows a portion of the wallpaper by Zuber et Cie in the President's Dining Room and was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on September 28, 1962, during the John F. Kennedy administration. The circa 1852 panoramic wallpaper is entitled "Views of the American War of Independence" and features events from the American Revolution against the backdrop of natural landmarks. First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy oversaw the installation of the wallpaper as part of her White House restoration project. The President's Dining Room is located on the Second Floor of the Executive Mansion in the northwest corner. The President's Dining Room was originally a bedroom referred to as the Prince of Wales Room after the 1860 visit of Edward Albert, Queen Victoria's son who would later become King Edward VII. It was not until the Kennedy administration that the room became the President's Dining Room and main eating room for the First Family.
  • Top of a Gilded Brass and Marble Guéridon Table, White House Collection
    Charles Honoré Lannuier
    tables
    furniture
    This is the intricately designed trompe-l’oeil marble top of a guéridon, or small table, made by Charles Honoré Lannuier circa 1810. This guéridon (small, circular French table) is made of mahogany, satinwood, rosewood, and possibly sycamore veneers, with gilded brass and marble. The table, a part of the White House Collection, also features an intricate Italian marble top and is considered a Lannuier masterpiece.
  • Wineglasses and Tulip Champagne Glass, Kennedy Administration
    Morgantown Glassware Guild
    tableware
    drinking cups
    State Service
    glassware
    This glassware was part of a set ordered by President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy in 1961 from the Morgantown Glassware Guild of Morgantown, West Virginia. The purchase of the elegant, simple set ended a long tradition of engraved glassware at the White House. The glassware became widely popular as many Americans purchased the same set for their households.
  • Detail of Empire Room Wallpaper, Kennedy Administration
    Scalamandré of New York
    wallpaper
    Bedroom
    Third Floor
    This wallpaper manufactured by Scalamandré of New York was in the Empire Room during the John F. Kennedy administration. The Empire Room is one of the guest bedrooms on the Third Floor of the White House. The red and white print is a contemporary version of the French early 19th-century Toile De Jouy pattern. This pattern, originally entitled "Hommage à Franklin," depicts scenes from the life and career of Benjamin Franklin and is partially based on a drawing in the White House Collection called "The Genius of Franklin" by French artist Jean-Honore Fragonard.
  • The Great Seal of California, Decatur House
    Unknown
    Decatur House
    California
    Washington, D.C.
    This parquet flooring and wood representation of the great seal of California was installed in the Decatur House dining room between 1872 and 1874. It was part of several changes Edward Fitzgerald Beale and his wife, Mary Edwards Beale instituted after they purchased the property in 1871. The Beales were the last family to own Decatur House. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. It was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur (1779-1820) and his wife, Susan Wheeler Decatur. Tragically, on March 22, 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel. After his death, his widow Susan Decatur rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into a co-stewardship arrangement of Decatur House.
  • Presentation Sword, Decatur House Collection
    William Rose
    Unknown
    furnishings
    swords
    Decatur House
    This sword was presented to Commodore Stephen Decatur by the Commonwealth of Virginia following his capture of the Macedonia on October 25, 1812. The blade was created in Philadelphia by William Rose and features an ivory and parcel-gilt hilt topped with a cast eagle, silver gilt plate, and brass stripes on the edges, and inlaid with gold foliage and silver lettering. An inscription on the blade reads, “In testimony of the splendid naval talents and valor displayed by Commodore Stephen Decatur commanding the United States Frigate UNITED STATES in the capture of the English Frigate MACEDONIA 25th, October 1812.” This presentation sword is part of the collection at Decatur House. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and Decatur House now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Sewing Table, Decatur House Collection
    Unknown
    furniture
    furnishings
    tables
    Decatur House
    This sewing table is made of wood and coated with between three and fifteen layers of fine black and gold lacquer. The sewing table was made in the early 19th century and is believed to have been an engagement gift from Stephen Decatur to his fiancée — a “Miss. King.” The King family passed the table down from generation to generation despite the couple not marrying. Stephen Decatur would go on to marry Susan Wheeler. The sewing table was made in China for the American market and originally had a silk bag attached to it, which was replaced with a mauve damask fabric in the 20th century. This table is a part of Decatur House Collection. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and Decatur House now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Celestial Globe, Decatur House Collection
    W. & T. M. Bardin
    furnishings
    Decatur House
    This celestial globe was created by William and Thomas Marriott Bardin (professionally known as W. & T. M. Bardin) circa 1800 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The globe is made of wood, brass, and glass and set on a three-legged wooden stand. There is a round compass at the juncture of the stretchers and the sphere and stand both have the months and zodiac names on it. The globe captures the position of stars observed in 1800 by Dr. William Hershel and is dedicated to Rev. Nevil Maskelyne, astronomer royal. This globe is one of a pair in the Decatur House Collection. The other is a terrestrial globe. It is believed these globes are part of the 1820 estate inventory of Decatur House. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and Decatur House now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Presentation Sword and Scabbard, Decatur House Collection
    William Rose
    Unknown
    furnishings
    swords
    Decatur House
    This sword and scabbard was presented to Commodore Stephen Decatur by the Commonwealth of Virginia following his capture of the Macedonia on October 25, 1812. The blade was created in Philadelphia by William Rose and features an ivory and parcel-gilt hilt topped with a cast eagle, silver gilt plate, and brass stripes on the edges, and inlaid with gold foliage and silver lettering. An inscription on the blade reads, “In testimony of the splendid naval talents and valor displayed by Commodore Stephen Decatur commanding the United States Frigate UNITED STATES in the capture of the English Frigate MACEDONIA 25th, October 1812.” The scabbard is made of gilt silver with cast-applied nautical decorations. This presentation sword and scabbard are a part of the collection at Decatur House. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into co-stewardship arrangement and Decatur House now serves as the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History.
  • Bellangé Firescreen, White House Collection
    Pierre-Antoine Bellangé
    furnishings
    construction & maintenance
    restoration
    This firescreen by Pierre-Antoine Bellangé forms part of the 53 piece suite purchased by President James Monroe in 1817. This photograph of the firescreen shows the piece during conservation treatment, with its upholstery and gilding removed. The White House Historical Association funded all aspects of this restoration.
  • Reupholstery Work on Bellangé Bergere
    Office of the Curator
    furniture
    seats
    construction & maintenance
    restoration
    This photograph is of the reupholstery work in progress on a bergere in the Bellangé suite. A bergere is an armchair with upholstered and enclosed sides. The bergere is part of the 53-piece gilded beechwood suite President James Monroe purchased from Pierre-Antoine Bellangé in 1817.
  • The Flag of the President
    Arthur E. Dubois
    flag
    This presidential flag was a new design ordered from Arthur E. DuBois and George M. Elsey by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. It was a sample submitted for President Harry Truman's approval in August 1945. This flag was first publicly flown on October 27, 1945 when the aircraft carrier Franklin D. Roosevelt was commissioned at Brooklyn Navy Yard. The flag presently remains the same except for the addition of two stars to represent Alaska and Hawaii. Although this is the flag of the president's arms, since it lacks the words around the edge, the flag is not a representation of the official Seal of the President. This photograph was taken by William Phillips.
  • Mirrored Wall Sconce, Greeen Room
    Samuel McIntire
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This mahogany mirrored wall sconce was likely created by American craftsman Samuel McIntire around 1800. McIntire is attributed with creating this sconce, and it's twin, due to the skilled craftsmanship and design. The sconce is seen here on the west wall of the Green Room, in a photograph by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes in January 1972, during the administration of Richard M. Nixon.
  • Mirrored Wall Sconce, Greeen Room
    Samuel McIntire
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This mahogany mirrored wall sconce was likely created by American craftsman Samuel McIntire around 1800. McIntire is attributed with creating this sconce, and it's twin, due to the skilled craftsmanship and design. The sconce is seen here on the west wall of the Green Room, in a photograph by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes in January 1972, during the administration of Richard M. Nixon.
  • Convex Girandole Mirror, Green Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This convex girandole mirror with wall sconces was made circa 1820 in New York. The wooden frame features carvings of a large American eagle at the top and a smaller British lion at the base. The wood has been gilded with two candle sconces on either end of the base. The creator is unknown. The girandole is captured in the Green Room in a photograph taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. It was added to the White House Collection in 1971.
  • Convex Girandole Mirror, Green Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This convex girandole mirror with wall sconces was made circa 1820 in New York. The wooden frame features carvings of a large American eagle at the top and a smaller British lion at the base. The wood has been gilded with two candle sconces on either end of the base. The creator is unknown. The girandole is captured in the Green Room in a photograph taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. It was added to the White House Collection in 1971.
  • Convex Girandole Mirror, Green Room
    Unknown
    State Floor
    Green Room
    mirror
    sconce
    This convex girandole mirror with wall sconces was made circa 1820 in New York. The wooden frame features carvings of a large American eagle at the top and a smaller British lion at the base. The wood has been gilded with two candle sconces on either end of the base. The creator is unknown. The girandole is captured in the Green Room in a photograph taken in January 1972 by Nelson Brown, Victor Boswell, and Robert S. Oakes during the administration of Richard M. Nixon. It was added to the White House Collection in 1971.