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  • Vice President Curtis Greets Native Americans
    Harris & Ewing
    American Indians
    This photograph shows Vice President Charles Curtis greeting a group of people in 1928. The group includes several American Indians dressed in traditional attire. Born in Kansas to a white father and Native American mother, and raised by his maternal grandparents, Curtis was the first person of Native American descent as well as the first person of color to serve as vice president. He served as vice president for President Herbert Hoover.
  • National Christmas Tree Lighting, 1932
    Harris & Ewing
    winter holidays
    Ellipse
    Christmas
    Christmas Tree lighting
    In this photograph, taken on December 24, 1932, Vice President Charles Curtis, his wife Anna Baird Curtis, and Senator Arthur Capper of Kansas pose in front of the National Christmas Tree during the National Christmas Tree lighting ceremony on the Ellipse. This was the first year the president was not in attendance since the ceremony's induction in 1924; Vice President Curtis lit the tree on behalf of President Herbert Hoover. The ceremony also marked the first instance of the "Singing Tree" tradition, in which the sound of Christmas carols played on a Victrola in a nearby police box could be heard over loudspeakers hidden in the tree.
  • Vice President Curtis Throws Opening Pitch at Congressional Baseball Game
    Harris & Ewing
    sports
    Washington, D.C.
    Congress
    In this photograph, taken on June 4, 1932, Vice President Charles Curtis throws the opening pitch at the Congressional Baseball Game at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C. The friendly competition between Republican and Democrat members of Congress was first held in 1909, and soon became an anticipated tradition. The first Congressional Baseball Game since the start of the Great Depression, the 1932 game was held as a fundraiser to benefit unemployed people in the District of Columbia. The Republicans defeated the Democrats with a final score of 19-5.
  • President Coolidge Signs Kellogg-Briand Peace Pact
    Harris & Ewing
    treaties
    signing
    State Floor
    East Room
    Congress
    Cabinet
    In this photograph, taken on January 17, 1929, President Calvin Coolidge signs the Kellogg-Briand Peace Pact in the East Room of the White House. Crafted by Secretary of State Frank B. Kellogg and French Foreign Minister Aristide Briand in light of the casualties that resulted from World War I, the international peace proposal committed 15 nations to outlawing aggression and war in settling disputes. The agreement was signed in Paris on August 27, 1928 and signed by Coolidge following ratification by Congress. Here, Coolidge signs the agreement on the former Cabinet table purchased for the White House during the Ulysses S. Grant administration. Among those in also attendance were Vice President Charles Gates Dawes, Secretary of State Frank B. Kellogg, Secretary of the Treasury Andrew W. Mellon, Secretary of War Dwight Filley Davis, Senator William Edgar Borah, Senator Claude Augustus Swanson, and Vice President-elect Charles Curtis.
  • Hoover Cabinet Members Visit White House at Christmastime
    Harris & Ewing
    winter holidays
    decorations
    North Portico
    North Door
    Cabinet
    In this photograph, guests including members of President Herbert Hoover's Cabinet and their spouses pose outside of the North Door of the White House. Trees flank either side of the door and a wreath hangs above for the holiday season. Among those pictured here is Vice President Charles Curtis, Secretary of the Navy Charles Francis Adams III, and Secretary of the Interior Ray Lyman Wilbur.
  • President Franklin D. Roosevelt Greets Native Americans
    Harris & Ewing
    transportation
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    In this photograph, taken in May 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt receives a group of American Indians from the Pueblo nation on the South Drive. The president is pictured seated in an open convertible. The guests visited the White House to express support for legislation sponsored by U.S. Commissioner for the Bureau of Indian Affairs John Collier, which protected Pueblo land from encroaching agricultural interests.
  • President Coolidge with American Indian Delegation
    Harris & Ewing
    American Indians
    delegation
    west view
    In this photograph, President Calvin Coolidge poses alongside a group of American Indian men outside the West Wing of the White House. Following the enactment of the Indian Citizenship Act in 1924, Coolidge invited delegations from many American Indian nations to the White House. During his presidency, Coolidge increased public perception of the challenges faced by American Indian communities, while promoting assimilation into American society.
  • President Coolidge with Sgt. I-See-O and Members of the Kiowa Nation
    Harris & Ewing
    south view
    delegation
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    military
    In this photograph, President Calvin Coolidge poses with Sgt. I-See-O (Plenty Fires), or Tahbonemah, and other members of the Kiowa nation on the South Grounds outside the West Wing. The White House residence and South Portico are visible in the background. A veteran who served as a scout for the United States Army for nearly 50 years, I-See-O was recognized and provided for in his old age by a special act from Congress.
  • American Indian Group Visits the Rose Garden
    Harris & Ewing
    west view
    pets
    West Terrace
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    American Indians
    This photograph was taken around February 1922. It shows a group of unidentified men in the West Garden, including some dressed in traditional American Indian attire and headdresses. Several people and a dog converse the West Terrace above. The dog is likely Laddie Boy, President Warren G. Harding's Airedale terrier. The West Garden was reimagined as a green theater for official ceremonies and rededicated as the Rose Garden during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • American Indian Group Poses for Photographs by the West Wing
    Harris & Ewing
    American Indians
    west view
    This photograph, taken around February 1922, shows a group of American Indian men gathered near the entrance of the West Wing. A man wearing a traditional headdress photographs the group. Many American Indian delegations traveled to the White House during the 19th and 20th centuries. Although some presidents expressed sympathy for their challenges, they were often met with pressure to concede their lands and assimilate into American society.
  • President Harding Receives Sioux and Crow Chiefs
    Harris & Ewing
    South Grounds
    South Lawn
    American Indians
    Veterans Day
    In this photograph, President Warren G. Harding meets with leaders from the Crow and Sioux nations on the South Grounds on the White House. The group stands in front of the West Garden, which was reimagined as a green theater for official ceremonies and rededicated as the Rose Garden during the John F. Kennedy administration. Here, President Harding and Commissioner of Indian Affairs Charles H. Burke meet with chiefs including Plenty Coups (Alaxchíia Ahú) from the Crow nation, and chiefs Frost, Owl, and Red Horse. The chiefs met with Harding at the White House to present him with a tobacco pouch after representing their people at the burial of the Unknown Soldier, held at Arlington National Ceremony on November 11, 1921. Also in attendance at the burial were presidents Woodrow Wilson and William H. Taft and Vice President Calvin Coolidge. Since 1921, presidents have paid their respects at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, often in observance of military commemorations including Veterans Day and Memorial Day.
  • President Coolidge with Comanche Delegation
    Harris & Ewing
    Congress
    American Indians
    delegation
    This photograph, taken on March 13, 1928, shows president Calvin Coolidge with a group of American Indians outside of the White House. The group is believed to be a delegation from the Comanche nation, headquartered near Lawton, Oklahoma. Also pictured at far right is Senator William Bliss Pine of Oklahoma. Pine, a successful oil businessman, was the elected representative from Okmulgee, Oklahoma, capital of the Creek (or Muscogee) nation. Following the enactment of the Indian Citizenship Act in 1924, Coolidge invited delegations from many American Indian nations to the White House. During his presidency, Coolidge increased public perception of the challenges faced by American Indian communities, while promoting assimilation into American society.
  • President Coolidge with American Indian Delegation
    Harris & Ewing
    south view
    delegation
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    west view
    In this photograph, President Calvin Coolidge poses alongside a group of American Indian visitors including men, women, and children on the South Grounds of the White House. At left of the group is the the West Garden. The West Garden was reimagined as a green theater for official ceremonies and rededicated as the Rose Garden during the John F. Kennedy administration. Following the enactment of the Indian Citizenship Act in 1924, Coolidge invited delegations from many American Indian nations to the White House. During his presidency, Coolidge increased public perception of the challenges faced by American Indian communities, while promoting assimilation into American society.
  • President and Mrs. Harding and Guests Descend the South Portico
    Harris & Ewing
    American Indians
    South Portico
    east view
    Jacqueline Kennedy Garden
    In this photograph, President Warren G. Harding and First Lady Florence Kling Harding descend the east staircase of the South Portico with guests who are dressed in traditional American Indian attire. During his presidency, Warren G. Harding welcomed several prominent members of the American Indian community at the White House including Chief Plenty Coups (Alaxchíia Ahú) from the Crow nation, and Chief Buffalo Bear and Princess Buffalo Bear of the Sioux nation. The East Garden is partially visible on the right side of this photograph. The garden was rededicated as the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden in 1965 by First Lady Lady Bird Johnson.
  • William Andrew Johnson
    Harris & Ewing
    staff
    Washington, D.C.
    U.S. Capitol
    Residence staff
    This photograph of William Andrew Johnson was taken in February 1937. William Andrew Johnson was born into slavery in the household of Andrew Johnson and brought to the Johnson White House to work as a free servant after his emancipation. In 1937, after being interviewed by journalist Ernie Pyle, William Johnson gained national recognition as the last surviving individual to be formerly enslaved by an American president. As a result, he was invited to the White House to meet President Franklin D. Roosevelt, where the president gifted Johnson a silver-headed, engraved cane. In this photograph, Johnson is pictured with the cane on the steps of the United States Capitol Building.
  • White House Executive Clerk Maurice C. Latta
    Harris & Ewing
    staff
    Residence staff
    This black-and-white photograph of White House executive clerk Maruice C. Latta was taken in 1917. Latta served nine presidents during his career at the White House from 1898-1948. Known for his integrity, institutional knowledge, and stenographic skill, by the end of his career he supervised over 200 staff members and assisted multiple incoming presidents adjust to the demands and procedures of their new position.
  • President's Doorkeeper Pat McKenna
    Harris & Ewing
    staff
    West Wing Reception Room
    West Wing
    Residence staff
    This black-and-white photograph shows doorkeeper Patrick "Pat" E. McKenna stationed at his desk outside the president's office in the West Wing in January 1935. McKenna served seven administrations as doorkeeper to the president from 1903-1940. In his role, McKenna interacted daily with politicians, diplomats, and White House staffers and determined which visitors received an audience with the president. He passed away following an illness on July 1, 1940.
  • Ira R. T. Smith Sorts Mail in the White House Mail Room
    Harris & Ewing
    Residence staff
    staff
    Mail Room
    This black-and-white photograph shows Ira R. T. Smith sorting mail in the White House Mail Room in 1938. Smith served nine presidents during his 50 year career in the White House Mail Room. He started as a mail clerk during the William McKinley administration, and retired as the chief of mails during the Henry S. Truman administration in 1948. Smith's duties included inspecting mail for safety, reading letters addressed to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW, and selecting messages to pass on to members of the first family or significant government officials. Smith documented his experiences in his memoir "Dear Mr. President," originally published in 1949.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt Contributes to Women's Olympic Fund
    Harris & Ewing
    sports
    South Portico
    In this photograph, taken on April 10, 1939, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt makes the inaugural contribution to the Women's Olympic Fund. The fund was created to help send track, swimming, and field teams to the 1940 Summer Olympic Games in Helsinki, Finland. In 1940, the Olympic Games were cancelled due to World War II. The Olympic Games did not resume until the 1948 Summer Olympics in London, England. Helsinki later hosted the 1951 Summer Olympics. Pictured in this photograph from left to right: unidentified child; Mrs. Roosevelt; Delores "Dee" Boeckmann, former Olympic runner and National Chairman of the Women's Track and Field Committee; Hjalmar Johan Fredrik Procopé, Finnish Minister of Foreign Affairs; and Lucille Brackett, a swimmer from Washington, D.C. The group stands on the balcony of the South Portico outside the Blue Room. A crowd of onlookers on the South Grounds and the Washington Monument are visible in the distance.
  • 1924 U.S. Olympic Boxing Team Visits the White House
    Harris & Ewing
    sports
    White House Guests
    This photograph, taken on June 14, 1924, shows members of the United States Olympic boxing team posing outside the White House. President Calvin Coolidge invited the team to visit prior to their departure for the 1924 Summer Olympic Games in Paris, France. Pictured here, left to right, front row: Fidel LaBarba; Jackie Fields; "Spike" Webb, coach at the United States Naval Academy; Raymond Fee; Joseph I. Salas; back row: George Mullholland; Adolphe Lefkowitch; and A. Allegrini.
  • 1916 New York Yankees Visit the White House
    Harris & Ewing
    sports
    White House Guests
    The photograph of the 1916 New York Yankees was taken by Harris & Ewing. The team is captured outside the West Wing during the Woodrow Wilson administration. Among the team members present during their 1916 visit are: Edward “Slim” Love, Charlie Mullen, Bob Shawkey, Lute Boone, Ray Fisher, Roger Peckinpaugh, Allen Russell, Urban Shocker, Wally Pipp, John Franklin “Home Run” Baker, trainer Jimmy Duggan, and Hugh High.
  • Hosiery Workers Protest Near the White House
    Harris & Ewing
    protest
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph, taken on January 28, 1938, shows five female hosiery workers protesting against the American boycott of Japanese silk. Three hundred women from the American Federation of Hosiery Workers marched from Union Station to the White House to protest the boycott, which the United States implemented in response to Japan's invasion of China in 1937. In this photograph, a woman holds a sign which asks "Were your lisle stockings made in Nazi Germany?"
  • President Hoover Views Fire Damage
    Harris & Ewing
    construction & maintenance
    disasters
    This photograph, taken on January 15, 1930, shows President Herbert Hoover walking past debris and workers repairing fire damage to the West Wing. On the evening of December 24, 1929, the West Wing caught fire, requiring the efforts of 130 firefighters to extinguish the powerful, four-alarm blaze. The fire started when pamphlets in the attic ignited, likely caused by a blocked or faulty chimney vent or defective electric wiring. Following repairs, President Herbert Hoover and his aides returned to the West Wing on April 14, 1930.
  • Engineers Inspect Fire Damage
    Harris & Ewing
    construction & maintenance
    disasters
    This photograph, taken in January 1930, shows engineers inspecting for fire damage on the roof of the White House. On the evening of December 24, 1929, the West Wing caught fire, requiring the efforts of 130 firefighters to extinguish the powerful, four-alarm blaze. The fire started when pamphlets in the attic ignited, likely caused by a blocked or faulty chimney vent or defective electric wiring. Following repairs, President Herbert Hoover and his aides returned to the West Wing on April 14, 1930.
  • 1917 Easter Egg Roll on the National Mall,
    Harris & Ewing
    Easter Egg Roll
    Washington, D.C.
    Washington Monument
    This photograph of crowds at the Easter Egg Roll on the grounds of Washington Monument was taken circa 1917 by Harris & Ewing. Due to safety measures because of World War I, the event was moved from the White House to the grounds of the Washington Monument. Dating back to 1878, the Easter Egg Roll is a cherished springtime tradition in Washington, D.C., with children and their families gathering on the South Lawn to enjoy the annual festivities. Although this tradition has continued mostly uninterrupted, periodically, due to food rationing, wartime security measures, the renovation of the White House, and other reasons the White House Easter Egg Roll has to be moved, canceled, or suspended.