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  • President John F. Kennedy Meets with Civil Rights Leaders
    Warren K. Leffler
    Oval Office
    West Wing
    civil rights
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President John F. Kennedy meeting with civil rights leaders was taken by Warren K. Leffler on August 28, 1963. The leaders met with President Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson after participating in the March for Jobs and Freedom. This photograph shows (left to right): Mathew H. Ahmann, National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice; Whitney M. Young, National Urban League; Martin Luther King, Jr., Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC); John Lewis, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and future congressman for Georgia's 5th District; Rabbi Joachim Prinz, American Jewish Congress; Reverend Eugene Carson Blake, United Presbyterian Church; A. Philip Randolph, AFL-CIO; President John F. Kennedy; Walter Reuther, of the United Auto Workers, with Vice President Johnson partially visible behind him; and Roy Wilkins (NAACP). Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz and Floyd B. McKissick of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) were also present but are not shown.
  • President Lyndon B. Johnson with Civil Rights Leaders in the Oval Office
    Yoichi R. Okamoto
    White House Guests
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    civil rights
    In this photograph, taken in the Oval Office on January 18, 1964 by Yoichi R. Okamoto, President Lyndon B. Johnson meets with a group of civil rights leaders. Among the group are the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (left), Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League (right), and James Farmer of the Congress of Racial Equality (far right).
  • President and Mrs. Reagan Deliver Radio Address at Camp David
    Michael Evans
    travel
    Camp David
    initiatives
    In this photograph, taken by Michael Evans on October 2, 1982, President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan deliver a national radio address on drug abuse and crime during a working vacation to Camp David. During her husband's presidency, Nancy Reagan's main initiative was taking an active role in the War on Drugs, creating the "Just Say No" campaign to educate youth about the dangers of drugs and drug abuse.
  • President Obama and G8 Leaders Watch Champions League Final
    Pete Souza
    sports
    Head of State
    Camp David
    travel
    This photograph, taken by Pete Souza on May 19, 2012, shows President Barack Obama and other world leaders from the G8 Summit including Prime Minister David Cameron of the United Kingdom and German Chancellor Angela Merkel watching the overtime shootout of the 2012 Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) Champions League final in the Laurel Cabin conference room at Camp David. During the soccer match, Chelsea of England narrowly defeated Bayern Munich of Germany during a penalty shootout. President Obama hosted the foreign contingent for the G8 Summit at Camp David from May 18-19, 2012. Among the others pictured in this photograph is José Manuel Durão Barroso, president of the European Commission.
  • President Johnson Listens to Recording from Capt. Charles S. Robb
    Jack E. Kightlinger
    technology
    West Wing
    Cabinet Room
    Vietnam War
    First Family
    In this photograph, taken by Jack E. Kightlinger on July 31, 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson sits by himself in the Cabinet Room listening to a recording sent by his son-in-law Capt. Charles S. Robb, who was deployed on active duty to Vietnam. The president is pictured hunched forward and facing downward, his forehead resting against his hand. On the far side of the room stands a bust depicting Johnson's predecessor, President John F. Kennedy.
  • Johnson Family Christmas Portrait
    Frank Wolfe
    Yellow Oval Room
    winter holidays
    Christmas
    Second Floor
    pets
    First Family
    In this photograph, taken by Frank Wolfe on December 24, 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson poses with his growing family for a holiday portrait in the Yellow Oval Room. Seated from left: first daughter Luci Baines Johnson Nugent with her son Patrick Lyndon Nugent on her lap; First Lady Lady Bird Johnson; President Johnson with dog Yuki; and first daughter Lynda Bird Johnson Robb cradling infant daughter Lucinda Robb. The family's private Christmas tree is visible in the background. On the wall are paintings "The Forest" (left) and "House on the Marne" (right) by Post-Impressionist painter Paul Cézanne.
  • Jill Biden
    Cheriss May
    official portrait
    This portrait photograph of First Lady Dr. Jill Biden was taken by White House photographer Cheriss May in 2021, during President Joseph R. Biden, Jr.’s first months in office. Dr. Biden previously served as second lady of the United States from 2009-2017, during the Barack Obama administration. A long time educator, Dr. Biden earned a Master of Education from West Chester University, a Master of Arts in english from Villanova University, and a Doctor of Education in educational leadership from the University of Delaware.
  • Pat Nixon at Diplomatic Children's Party, 1969
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    winter holidays
    parties
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    In this photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph J. Scherschel on December 23, 1969, First Lady Pat Nixon sits with an audience of approximately 400 children during a Christmas party she hosted for children of the Diplomatic Corps. The party was coordinated by THIS (The Hospitality and Information Service) for Diplomats, a volunteer organization established in 1961 to support newly appointed diplomats and their families transition to life in Washington, D.C. During the party, Mrs. Nixon and the children were treated to selections from Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky's "The Nutcracker" ballet, performed by 40 students from the Washington School of Ballet.
  • Christmas Party for Children of Diplomats, 1977
    Joseph H. Bailey
    winter holidays
    parties
    arts & culture
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    This photograph was taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey on December 14, 1977, during a Christmas party hosted by First Lady Rosalynn Carter for the children of the Diplomatic Corps. The party was coordinated by THIS (The Hospitality and Information Service) for Diplomats, a volunteer organization established in 1961 to support newly appointed diplomats and their families transition to life in Washington, D.C. Over 400 children attended the party, where they enjoyed a performance of "The Littlest Clown" by the Broadway Pixie Judy Troupe, a family theater company founded by Judith Ann Abrams in 1965. During the production, first daughter Amy Carter was invited onto the East Room stage and dressed as a clown. In this photograph, Mrs. Carter congratulates the group onstage, including Amy Carter (seated in her clown costume) and distinguished actress Helen Hayes. Hayes, a board member of the Broadway Pixie Judy Troupe, narrated the production.
  • Rosalynn and Amy Carter at Diplomatic Children's Party, 1977
    Joseph H. Bailey
    press
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    winter holidays
    parties
    This photograph was taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey on December 14, 1977, during a Christmas party hosted by First Lady Rosalynn Carter for the children of the Diplomatic Corps. The party was coordinated by THIS (The Hospitality and Information Service) for Diplomats, a volunteer organization established in 1961 to support newly appointed diplomats and their families transition to life in Washington, D.C. Over 400 children attended the party, where they enjoyed a performance of "The Littlest Clown" by the Broadway Pixie Judy Troupe, a family theater company founded by Judith Ann Abrams in 1965. Here, First Lady Rosalynn Carter and her daughter, Amy, enjoy the performance with an audience of children. White House press corps journalist Helen Thomas and Mary Prince, Amy Carter's nanny, stand behind the audience.
  • Pat Nixon at Diplomatic Children's Party, 1969
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    winter holidays
    parties
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    In this photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph J. Scherschel on December 23, 1969, First Lady Pat Nixon sits with an audience of approximately 400 children during a Christmas party she hosted for children of the Diplomatic Corps. The party was coordinated by THIS (The Hospitality and Information Service) for Diplomats, a volunteer organization established in 1961 to support newly appointed diplomats and their families transition to life in Washington, D.C. During the party, Mrs. Nixon and the children were treated to selections from Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky's "The Nutcracker" ballet, performed by 40 students from the Washington School of Ballet.
  • Pat Nixon at Diplomatic Children's Party, 1969
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    winter holidays
    parties
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    In this photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph J. Scherschel on December 23, 1969, First Lady Pat Nixon sits with an audience of approximately 400 children during a Christmas party she hosted for children of the Diplomatic Corps. The party was coordinated by THIS (The Hospitality and Information Service) for Diplomats, a volunteer organization established in 1961 to support newly appointed diplomats and their families transition to life in Washington, D.C. During the party, Mrs. Nixon and the children were treated to selections from Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky's "The Nutcracker" ballet, performed by 40 students from the Washington School of Ballet.
  • Southwest View of the Family Dining Room, Decatur House
    Bruce White
    Decatur House
    This photograph of the family dining room in Decatur House was taken by Bruce White on December 17, 2017. The reproduction 19th century dining room table is set with Chinese export famille rose dinnerware and Beale family silver from the Decatur House Collection. On the mantel is a statue called the Bronco Buster by Frederic Remington. The painting above the mantel is Horses Quenching Their Thirst, Camels Disdaining by Ernest E. de F. Narjot and depicts the U.S. Camel Corps, an experimental military unit. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. It was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur (1779-1820) and his wife, Susan Wheeler Decatur. Tragically, on March 22, 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel. After his death, his widow Susan Decatur rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into a co-stewardship arrangement of Decatur House.
  • Christmas Party for Children of Diplomats, 1974
    Karl Schumacher
    winter holidays
    parties
    Christmas
    East Room
    State Floor
    In this photograph, taken by Karl Schumacher on December 11, 1974, First Lady Betty Ford sits with an audience of children during the annual White House Christmas party for the children of diplomats. The party was organized by THIS (The Hospitality and Information Service) for Diplomats, a volunteer organization established in 1961 to support newly appointed diplomats and their families transition to life in Washington, D.C. The party featured entertainment by magician James Randi as well as appearances by costumed characters including "Mickey Mouse" and "Santa Claus," portrayed by White House aide John E. Nidecker.
  • Pat Nixon Greets Big Bird
    Jack E. Kightlinger
    winter holidays
    parties
    arts & culture
    Christmas
    In this photograph, taken by Jack E. Kightlinger on December 22, 1970, First Lady Pat Nixon greets "Big Bird" from PBS's "Sesame Street" during a Christmas party for children of diplomats. The party was organized by THIS (The Hospitality and Information Service) for Diplomats, a volunteer organization established in 1961 to support newly appointed diplomats and their families transition to life in Washington, D.C. The annual children's Christmas parties for children of diplomats often featured appearances by popular children's television entertainers. "Big Bird" also appeared at the diplomats' children's Christmas parties in 1976, 1978, and 1990.
  • Open Doors of the Front Hall, Decatur House
    Bruce White
    Decatur House
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph of the open doors in the curved doorway of Decatur House was taken by Bruce White on December 18, 2017. The doors lead to the main staircase which takes guests to the upstairs parlors. The doorway also features wooden faux vaulting, including a shallow dome. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. It was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur (1779-1820) and his wife, Susan Wheeler Decatur. Tragically, on March 22, 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel. After his death, his widow Susan Decatur rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into a co-stewardship arrangement of Decatur House.
  • Christmas Party for Children of Diplomats, 1985
    Joseph H. Bailey
    State Floor
    East Room
    Christmas
    performing
    arts & culture
    parties
    winter holidays
    In this photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey on December 9, 1985, NBC "Today" show weatherman Willard Scott, dressed as Santa Claus, introduces child actor Emmanuel Lewis during a Christmas party in the East Room hosted by First Lady Nancy Reagan for the children of the Diplomatic Corps. Lewis played the title character in the American television sitcom "Webster" from 1983-1989. In this photograph, Mrs. Reagan and social secretary Linda Faulkner can be seen seated among the children in the audience. The party was coordinated by THIS (The Hospitality and Information Service) for Diplomats, a volunteer organization established in 1961 to support newly appointed diplomats and their families transition to life in Washington, D.C.
  • Closed Doors of the Front Hall, Decatur House
    Bruce White
    Decatur House
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph of the closed doors in the curved doorway of the Decatur House was taken by Bruce White on December 18, 2017. The doors lead to the main staircase which takes guests to the upstairs parlors. The doorway also features wooden faux vaulting, including a shallow dome. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. It was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur (1779-1820) and his wife, Susan Wheeler Decatur. Tragically, on March 22, 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel. After his death, his widow Susan Decatur rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into a co-stewardship arrangement of Decatur House.
  • First Floor Parlor Fireplace, Decatur House
    Bruce White
    Decatur House
    furnishings
    This photograph of a fireplace in one of the first-floor parlors of Decatur House was taken by Bruce White on December 8, 2017. The room is furnished with a selection of comfortable period reproductions and pieces from the Decatur House Collection and the first-floor parlors are now used as a special meeting and reception space by the White House Historical Association. Decorative arts objects from the collection on display in this photograph are Stephen Decatur’s 1812 presentation sword and one of a pair of figural candelabra owned by Marie Ogle Beale. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. It was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur (1779-1820) and his wife, Susan Wheeler Decatur. Tragically, on March 22, 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel. After his death, his widow Susan Decatur rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into a co-stewardship arrangement of Decatur House.
  • The Great Seal of California, Decatur House
    Unknown
    Decatur House
    California
    Washington, D.C.
    This parquet flooring and wood representation of the great seal of California was installed in the Decatur House dining room between 1872 and 1874. It was part of several changes Edward Fitzgerald Beale and his wife, Mary Edwards Beale instituted after they purchased the property in 1871. The Beales were the last family to own Decatur House. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. It was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur (1779-1820) and his wife, Susan Wheeler Decatur. Tragically, on March 22, 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel. After his death, his widow Susan Decatur rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into a co-stewardship arrangement of Decatur House.
  • Horses Quenching Their Thirst, Camels Disdaining, Decatur House Collection
    Ernest E. de F. Narjot
    painting
    Decatur House
    This oil on canvas painting of the U.S. Camel Corps was completed by Ernest E. de F. Narjot in 1867. The painting depicts horses drinking eagerly with camels in the background. The painting highlights the usefulness of camels as back animals in the American southwest during military operations and had been championed by Gen. Edward Beale. Beale was a western adventurer naval officer, explorer, frontiersman, superintendent of Indian affairs, California rancher, and later a diplomat. Beale would help form the U.S. Camel Corp and the experiment lasted from 1856-1866. This painting commemorates the corps and is part of the Decatur House Collection. The Decatur House, which is also home to the David M. Rubenstein National Center for White House History, was completed in 1818. It was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. It was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur (1779-1820) and his wife, Susan Wheeler Decatur. Tragically, on March 22, 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel. After his death, his widow Susan Decatur rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into a co-stewardship arrangement of Decatur House.
  • Decatur House Dining Room
    Bruce White
    Decatur House
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph of the Decatur House dining room was taken by Bruce White on September 20, 2017. On the walls are a set of six Kakemono panels painted on silk that President Ulysses S. Grant gifted Gen. Edward Beale. The room also features parquet flooring with the inset of the great seal of California which Beale and his wife, Mary had installed between 1872-1874. On the ceiling is an ornate twelve-armed chandelier with frosted globes and two rows of dangling, faceted spear prisms, which was purchased at the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial Exposition. The chandelier was installed for the Beales in 1880 and eventually converted from gas to electric. The Decatur House was completed in 1818. The house was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. It was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur (1779-1820) and his wife, Susan Wheeler Decatur. Tragically, on March 22, 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel. After his death, his widow Susan Decatur rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into a co-stewardship arrangement of Decatur House.
  • Drawing of the Front Hall's Curved Doorway, Decatur House Collection
    Benjamn Henry Latrobe
    plans
    Decatur House
    Washington, D.C.
    This architectural drawing of the entrance hall doors to Decatur House was created by Benjamin Henry Latrobe in January 1818. The drawing also depicts the door elevation and reflected ceiling. Latrobe is best known as the architect who designed the United States Capitol, St. John's Church, Decatur House in Lafayette Square, the White House East and West Terraces, and the Madison state rooms. He was also the chief engineer for the U.S. Navy. Completed in 1818, Decatur House was the third building on Lafayette Square and its first private residence. Decatur House was designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the architect of the Capitol and several other famous buildings, for Commodore Stephen Decatur and his wife, Susan. Tragically, in 1820 Stephen Decatur was mortally wounded during a duel and his widow Susan subsequently rented out the house to foreign ministers and several secretaries of state. The house was eventually sold and passed through several hands, including the Gadsby family, the U.S. Subsistence Bureau, and the Beale family. Marie Ogle Beale, a society maven, and the last owner left the house to National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1961. In 2010, the White House Historical Association and National Trust entered into a co-stewardship arrangement of Decatur House.
  • Pasta Salad with a Twist
    Bruce White
    food
    This photograph of chilled pasta salad made by chef Mathew Wendel was taken by Bruce White. Wendel served the dish at President George W. Bush’s Prairie Chapel Ranch near Crawford, Texas. Wendel became acquainted with the Bush family in 1995, while working at the Governor's Mansion in Austin, Texas, as a waiter-caterer with the Word of Mouth catering company. After Bush was elected president in 2000, Wendel prepared comforting meals for the first family during their trips to Camp David and during visits home to the Prairie Chapel Ranch near Crawford, Texas.
  • Governor George W. Bush with Catering Staff
    Unknown
    residence
    Texas
    This photograph shows Governor George W. Bush with catering staff members at the Governor's Mansion in Austin, Texas. Pictured on the left is Matthew Wendel. Wendel met Governor Bush and his family in 1995, while serving as a waiter-caterer with the Word of Mouth catering company. After Bush was elected president in 2000, Wendel prepared comforting meals for the first family during their trips to Camp David and visits home to the Prairie Chapel Ranch, near Crawford, Texas.