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  • President Reagan Meets with Members of the1988 Winter Olympic Team
    Susan Biddle
    State Floor
    East Room
    sports
    receptions
    White House Guests
    In this photograph taken by Susan Biddle, President Ronald Reagan meets with members of the 1988 United States Winter Olympic speed skating team in the East Room on March 8, 1988. Among the speed skaters to meet President Reagan for a photo opportunity were Bonnie Blair, Dan Jansen, Moira D'Andrea, Nancy Swider-Peltz, Jeff Klaiber, Mary Docter, David Cruikshank, and John Backfield. The Olympians met President Reagan at the White House following the culmination of the 1988 games in Calgary the previous month.
  • President Reagan Meets with Members of the1988 Winter Olympic Team
    Susan Biddle
    State Floor
    East Room
    sports
    receptions
    White House Guests
    In this photograph taken by Susan Biddle, President Ronald Reagan meets with members of the 1988 United States Winter Olympic speed skating team in the East Room on March 8, 1988. Among the speed skaters to meet President Reagan for a photo opportunity were Bonnie Blair, Dan Jansen, Moira D'Andrea, Nancy Swider-Peltz, Jeff Klaiber, Mary Docter, David Cruikshank, and John Backfield. The Olympians met President Reagan at the White House following the culmination of the 1988 games in Calgary the previous month.
  • President Reagan Meets with Members of the1988 Winter Olympic Team
    Susan Biddle
    State Floor
    East Room
    sports
    receptions
    White House Guests
    In this photograph taken by Susan Biddle, President Ronald Reagan meets with members of the 1988 United States Winter Olympic speed skating team in the East Room on March 8, 1988. Among the speed skaters to meet President Reagan for a photo opportunity were Bonnie Blair, Dan Jansen, Moira D'Andrea, Nancy Swider-Peltz, Jeff Klaiber, Mary Docter, David Cruikshank, and John Backfield. The Olympians met President Reagan at the White House following the culmination of the 1988 games in Calgary the previous month.
  • Executive Order 9981 - Banning Segregation in the Armed Services
    National Archives and Records Administration
    military
    documents
    Executive Order
    civil rights
    This is the first page of an Executive Order signed by President Harry S. Truman on July 26, 1948, declaring the equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion, or national origin. The Executive Order established the President's Committee on Equality of Treatment and Opportunity in the Armed Forces. The purpose of the seven-member advisory committee was to oversee the rules, procedures, and practices of the armed forces to ensure that equality principles were followed and implemented.
  • Executive Order 9981 - Banning the Segregation of the Armed Forces
    National Archives and Records Administration
    military
    documents
    Executive Order
    civil rights
    This is the second page of an Executive Order signed by President Harry S. Truman on July 26, 1948, declaring the equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion, or national origin. The Executive Order established the President's Committee on Equality of Treatment and Opportunity in the Armed Forces. The purpose of the seven-member advisory committee was to oversee the rules, procedures, and practices of the armed forces to ensure that equality principles were followed and implemented.
  • Bill Signing Ceremony for Civil Rights Act of 1964
    O. J. Rapp
    signing
    press
    bills
    State Floor
    East Room
    civil rights
    In this photograph, taken by O. J. Rapp on July 2, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson delivers a televised address to the nation prior to signing into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The bill prohibited job discrimination on the basis of race, sex, color, religion, or national origin, ended segregation in public places, and the unequal application of voting requirements. In attendance at the ceremony were members of Congress and civil rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rep. Peter Rodino of New Jersey.
  • President Johnson Meets with Civil Rights Leaders
    Cecil Stoughton
    meetings
    West Wing
    Cabinet Room
    civil rights
    In this photograph, taken by Cecil Stoughton on June 24, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson meets with leaders from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in the Cabinet Room of the West Wing. In attendance was Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP, and over 30 members of the organization's senior leadership including members of the NAACP Board of Directors and vice presidents. The leaders had gathered in Washington, D.C. for the 55th annual convention of the NAACP, where they sought protection from Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy and the federal government for African Americans in Mississippi following the disappearance of civil rights activists James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner, who were later confirmed to be murdered.
  • Black Tie Dinner for the National Council on the Arts
    Robert L. Knudsen
    winter holidays
    arts & culture
    State Floor
    Blue Room Christmas Tree
    Blue Room
    meals
    This photograph was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on December 13, 1966, following a black tie dinner hosted by President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson for members of the National Council on the Arts. It was established through the National Arts and Cultural Development Act of 1964, before the The National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities Act passed in 1965, establishing the National Endowment for the Arts. The National Council on the Arts consists of appointees selected by the president and approved by the Senate for their contributions to the arts, who advise the Chairman of the National Endowment of the Arts. Many of the founding members of the National Council of the Humanities attended this reception, including Ralph Ellison, Paul Engle, Elizabeth Ashley, Gregory Peck, Oliver Smith, William Pereira, Leonard Bernstein, and Isaac Stern. Here, President and Mrs. Johnson receive guests by the Blue Room Christmas Tree.
  • Black Tie Dinner for the National Council on the Arts
    Robert L. Knudsen
    military
    meals
    decorations
    arts & culture
    U.S. Marine Band
    State Floor
    Entrance Hall
    winter holidays
    This photograph was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on December 13, 1966, following a black tie dinner hosted by President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson for members of the National Council on the Arts. It was established through the National Arts and Cultural Development Act of 1964, before the The National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities Act passed in 1965, establishing the National Endowment for the Arts. The National Council on the Arts consists of appointees selected by the president and approved by the Senate for their contributions to the arts, who advise the Chairman of the National Endowment of the Arts. Many of the founding members of the National Council of the Humanities attended this reception, including Ralph Ellison, Paul Engle, Elizabeth Ashley, Gregory Peck, Oliver Smith, William Pereira, Leonard Bernstein, and Isaac Stern. Here, Lynda Bird Johnson, eldest daughter of the president and first lady, dances with guests in the Entrance Hall as the United States Marine Band performs. The room is festively decorated for the holiday season: visible on the mirror behind the Marine Band is an elaborate "Twelve Days of Christmas" motif, made of colorful felt figures. Similar displays were a tradition in the Entrance Hall throughout Lyndon B. Johnson's presidency.
  • President Bush Participates in a Wreath Laying Ceremony
    Unknown
    military
    memorials
    Virginia
    Veterans Day
    Arlington National Cemetery
    commemorations
    In this photograph, President George H. W. Bush participates in a ceremonial wreath laying at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery on Veterans Day 1991. Since 1921, presidents have paid their respects at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, often in observance of military commemorations including Veterans Day and Memorial Day.
  • President Reagan Participates in a Wreath Laying Ceremony
    Pete Souza
    military
    memorials
    commemorations
    Virginia
    Veterans Day
    Arlington National Cemetery
    In this photograph, President Ronald Reagan participates in a ceremonial wreath laying at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery on Veterans Day 1985. Since 1921, presidents have paid their respects at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, often in observance of military commemorations including Veterans Day and Memorial Day.
  • President Coolidge Participates in a Wreath Laying Ceremony
    Department of Defence
    military
    memorials
    commemorations
    Virginia
    Veterans Day
    Arlington National Cemetery
    In this photograph, taken in 1927, President Calvin Coolidge observes Armistice Day, which preceded the formal holiday of Veterans Day, by laying a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. Since 1921, presidents have paid their respects at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, often in observance of military commemorations including Veterans Day and Memorial Day.
  • The Nixons and Apollo 12 Astronauts Receive Guests at Worship Service
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    White House Guests
    State Floor
    Cross Hall
    astronauts
    worship services
    In this photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph J. Scherschel on December 21, 1969, President Richard M. Nixon, First Lady Pat Nixon, astronauts from the Apollo 12 lunar exploration mission, and their wives receive guests in the Cross Hall for a worship service. The worship service was conducted in the East Room and attended by approximately 325 guests. The crew of Apollo 12 included the second group of astronauts to walk on the moon, on November 19-20, 1969. Cdr. Pete Conrad, his wife, Jane; lunar module pilot Alan Bean, his wife, Sue; and command module pilot Richard F. Gordon, Jr. and his wife, Barbara were the overnight guests of president and Mrs. Nixon at the White House on December 20-21, 1969.
  • The Nixons and Apollo 12 Astronauts Greet Choristers
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    worship services
    White House Guests
    State Floor
    Cross Hall
    astronauts
    In this photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph J. Scherschel on December 21, 1969, President Richard M. Nixon, First Lady Pat Nixon, astronauts from the Apollo 12 lunar exploration mission, and their wives greet members of the Boys Choir of the Washington National Cathedral in the Cross Hall. The choristers performed that day at a worship service in the East Room. The crew of Apollo 12 included the second group of astronauts to walk on the moon, on November 19-20, 1969. Cdr. Pete Conrad, his wife, Jane; lunar module pilot Alan Bean, his wife, Sue; and command module pilot Richard F. Gordon, Jr. and his wife, Barbara were the overnight guests of president and Mrs. Nixon at the White House on December 20-21-1969.
  • President Nixon Signs Blue Lake Bill
    Robert L. Knudsen
    signing
    decorations
    bills
    State Floor
    State Dining Room
    American Indians
    delegation
    In this photograph, taken by Robert L. Knudsen on December 15, 1970, President Richard M. Nixon signs bill H.R. 471, also known as the Blue Lake Bill or the Taos Pueblo American Indian Land Deed, in the State Dining Room. President Nixon is accompanied by Taos Pueblo Governor Quirino Romero, Cacique religious leader Juan de Jesus Romero and secretary and interpreter Paul Bernal. The legislation returned Blue Lake and the surrounding mountains to the Taos Pueblo people. The land had been seized by the United States government in 1906.
  • Coolidge on Vacation in Black Hills, South Dakota
    Rise Studio
    travel
    South Dakota
    press
    This photograph was taken during President Calvin Coolidge's vacation in Black Hills, South Dakota in the summer of 1927. Coolidge stands in the center of the photograph dressed as a cowboy, flanked on both sides by press photographers. The president received the Western-style hat and cowboy boots as gifts during his tour. Coolidge chose to vacation in the Black Hills following a campaign by South Dakotans designed to appeal to the president's love of trout fishing. The president's visit brought a boon to the tourism and infrastructure to the area. During his vacation, Coolidge delivered remarks at the dedication of the start of work on the Mount Rushmore National Memorial and visited Pine Ridge, a tribal reservation of the Lakota people.
  • President Coolidge Signs Kellogg-Briand Peace Pact
    Harris & Ewing
    treaties
    signing
    State Floor
    East Room
    Congress
    Cabinet
    In this photograph, taken on January 17, 1929, President Calvin Coolidge signs the Kellogg-Briand Peace Pact in the East Room of the White House. Crafted by Secretary of State Frank B. Kellogg and French Foreign Minister Aristide Briand in light of the casualties that resulted from World War I, the international peace proposal committed 15 nations to outlawing aggression and war in settling disputes. The agreement was signed in Paris on August 27, 1928 and signed by Coolidge following ratification by Congress. Here, Coolidge signs the agreement on the former Cabinet table purchased for the White House during the Ulysses S. Grant administration. Among those in also attendance were Vice President Charles Gates Dawes, Secretary of State Frank B. Kellogg, Secretary of the Treasury Andrew W. Mellon, Secretary of War Dwight Filley Davis, Senator William Edgar Borah, Senator Claude Augustus Swanson, and Vice President-elect Charles Curtis.
  • President Nixon Meets with Taos Pueblo Leaders
    Oliver F. Atkins
    West Wing
    Cabinet Room
    American Indians
    delegation
    In this photograph, taken by Oliver F. Atkins on July 8, 1970, President Richard M. Nixon meets with leaders of the Taos Pueblo American Indian Tribal Council in the Cabinet Room in the West Wing. Among those in attendance were Taos Pueblo Governor Quirino Romero, Cacique religious leader Juan de Jesus Romero, secretary and interpreter Paul Bernal, senior councilman James Mirabal, president of the National Congress of American Indians and member of the National Council on Indian Opportunity Earl Old Person, and John Rainer, vice president of the National Congress of American Indians and member of the National Council on Indian Opportunity. Later that year, on December 15, 1970, Nixon signed bill H.R. 471 in the State Dining Room, which returned Blue Lake and surrounding mountains to the Taos Pueblo people. The land had been seized by the United States government in 1906.
  • American Indian Delegation on the South Grounds
    Mathew Brady
    delegation
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    This photograph shows a group of American Indian delegates, lawmakers, and interpreters gathered on the South Grounds of the White House. During the 19th and 20th centuries, many American Indian delegations traveled to the White House to express the concerns and challenges of their people. However, their requests were frequently dismissed, as they faced pressures to concede their lands and assimilate into American society. The photograph is credited to the studio of Mathew Brady and was likely taken during the James Buchanan or Abraham Lincoln administrations.
  • American Indian Delegation by the South Portico
    Mathew Brady
    American Indians
    delegation
    This photograph, taken by Mathew Brady during the James Buchanan administration, shows a group of American Indian and white men by the South Portico. The American Indians are believed to be representatives from the Ponca, Pawnee, Potawatomi, and Sac and Fox nations. During the 19th and 20th centuries, many American Indian delegations traveled to the White House to express the concerns and challenges of their people. However, their requests were frequently dismissed, as they faced pressures to concede their lands and assimilate into American society.
  • President Coolidge with Chiefs of the Sioux Nation
    National Photo Company
    delegation
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    Rose Garden
    This photograph, taken on March 10, 1925, shows President Calvin Coolidge with members of the Sioux Indian Republican Club of the Rosebud Reservation. The Rosebud Indian Reservation is located along South Dakota's southern border and is adjacent to the Pine Ridge Reservation. This photograph was taken on the South Grounds, near the West Garden, which was reimagined as the Rose Garden during the John F. Kennedy administration. During his presidency, Coolidge increased public perception of the challenges faced by American Indian communities, while promoting assimilation into American society.
  • President Coolidge Greets American Indians from the Osage Nation
    Library of Congress
    delegation
    American Indians
    South Grounds
    South Lawn
    This photograph shows President Calvin Coolidge posing with representatives from the Osage nation on the South Grounds of the White House. Charles H. Burke, commissioner on Indian Affairs, stands at right of Coolidge. Also among those photographed are Chief Bacon Rind (second to left), and Chief Paul Red Eagle (immediate right of Burke). During his presidency, Coolidge increased public perception of the challenges faced by American Indian communities, while promoting assimilation into American society.
  • President Coolidge Meets with Committee of One Hundred
    National Photo Company
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    delegation
    South Lawn
    In this photograph, President Calvin Coolidge meets with the Committee of One Hundred on the South Grounds of the White House. The Committee of One Hundred consisted of scholars, activists, and policy specialists who advised the federal government on critical issues facing the Native American population. During the meeting, Ruth Muskrat, a Mount Holyoke college student of Irish and Cherokee descent, presented Coolidge with a copy of "The Red Man in the United States," a book describing the adverse economic, educational, religious, and cultural challenges facing Native Americans.
  • President Coolidge Meets with Committee of One Hundred
    National Photo Company
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    delegation
    South Lawn
    In this photograph, President Calvin Coolidge meets with the Committee of One Hundred on the South Grounds of the White House. The Committee of One Hundred consisted of scholars, activists, and policy specialists who advised the federal government on critical issues facing the Native American population. Here, Ruth Muskrat, a Mount Holyoke college student of Irish and Cherokee descent, presents President Coolidge with a copy of "The Red Man in the United States," a book describing the adverse economic, educational, religious, and cultural challenges facing Native Americans.
  • President Franklin D. Roosevelt Greets Native Americans
    Harris & Ewing
    transportation
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    In this photograph, taken in May 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt receives a group of American Indians from the Pueblo nation on the South Drive. The president is pictured seated in an open convertible. The guests visited the White House to express support for legislation sponsored by U.S. Commissioner for the Bureau of Indian Affairs John Collier, which protected Pueblo land from encroaching agricultural interests.