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  • Jacqueline Kennedy Garden Pergola, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Jacqueline Kennedy Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the pergola in the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden as it appeared in April 1983 under the administration of Ronald Reagan. The pergola was designed by renowned architect I. M. Pei. Formerly called the East Garden, or the First Lady's Garden, the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden was formally dedicated to Jacqueline Kennedy by First Lady Lady Bird Johnson in 1965. The botanical composition of the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden changes with each administration. Where the Rose Garden is centered on roses, the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden is centered on the personal tastes of the current administration.
  • Rose Garden from the Oval Office, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • View of the Rose Garden from the Oval Office, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Outside the Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden from the Oval Office, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden from the Oval Office, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Outside the Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Outside the Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden from the Oval Office, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden from the Oval Office, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Rose Garden from the Oval Office, Reagan Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph, taken by National Geographic photographer Joseph H. Bailey, shows the Rose Garden as it appeared in April 1983, during the administration of Ronald Reagan. The Rose Garden is located on the west side of the South Grounds, just outside the Oval Office. It has gone through several incarnations: a vegetable garden in the first part of the 19th century, a “colonial” garden in 1902, and then replaced with a rose garden in 1913. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy wanted to expand the garden for official functions and events. His idea became the Rose Garden, designed by horticulturist, gardener, and close friend of the Kennedys, Rachel Lambert "Bunny" Mellon. The garden was installed the following year, becoming a green theater for official ceremonies and a special place for the first family’s private enjoyment.
  • Nixon Dogs in the Library at Christmastime
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    holidays
    Christmas
    pets
    Ground Floor
    Library
    This holiday photograph of Pasha, a Yorkshire Terrier belonging to President Richard M. Nixon, was taken by Joseph J. Scherschel on December 19, 1969 in the White House Library. Behind her sits another Nixon family dog, Irish Setter King Timahoe, decked in green ribbons. Both lived at the White House with the Nixon family. King Timahoe belonged to President Nixon, while Pasha was daughter Tricia Nixon's dog.
  • Nixon Dogs in the Library at Christmastime
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    pets
    holidays
    Library
    Ground Floor
    Christmas
    staff
    This photograph, taken by Joseph J. Scherschel on December 19, 1969, shows Traphes Bryant in the White House Library with Pasha, a Yorkshire Terrier belonging to Tricia Nixon, Vicki, a French Poodle owned by Julie Nixon Eisenhower, and King Timahoe, President Richard M. Nixon's Irish Setter. Bryant was an electrician with the General Services Administration from 1948 to 1972 and served as the unofficial presidential dog keeper for several first families beginning with President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy in 1961.
  • Nixon Dogs in the Library at Christmastime
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    pets
    holidays
    Library
    Ground Floor
    Christmas
    staff
    This photograph, taken by Joseph J. Scherschel on December 19, 1969, shows Traphes Bryant in the White House Library with Pasha, a Yorkshire Terrier belonging to Tricia Nixon, Vicki, a French Poodle owned by Julie Nixon Eisenhower, and King Timahoe, President Richard M. Nixon's Irish Setter. Bryant was an electrician with the General Services Administration from 1948 to 1972 and served as the unofficial presidential dog keeper for several first families beginning with President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy in 1961.
  • Nixon Dogs in the Library at Christmastime
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    holidays
    Christmas
    pets
    Ground Floor
    Library
    This holiday photograph of the Nixon family dogs was taken by Joseph J. Scherschel on December 19, 1969 in the White House Library. Vicki, a French Poodle, faces the camera, while Yorkshire Terrier Pasha and an Irish Setter named King Timahoe stand behind. All three dogs lived at the White House with President Richard M. Nixon and his family. King Timahoe belonged to President Nixon, while Vicki was the pet of daughter Julie Nixon Eisenhower, and Pasha was daughter Tricia Nixon's dog.
  • Nixon Dogs in the Library at Christmastime
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    holidays
    Christmas
    pets
    Ground Floor
    Library
    This holiday photograph of the Nixon family dogs was taken by Joseph J. Scherschel on December 19, 1969 in the White House Library. Pasha, a Yorkshire Terrier, sniffs the carpet in front of the camera. Vicki, a French Poodle, walks into the frame from the right, while King Timahoe, an Irish Setter, sits a slight distance away from the camera wearing green Christmas ribbons. All three dogs lived at the White House with President Richard M. Nixon and his family. King Timahoe belonged to President Nixon, while Vicki was the pet of daughter Julie Nixon Eisenhower, and Pasha was daughter Tricia Nixon's dog.