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  • First Ladies Composite
    White House Historical Association
    fashion
    clothing & accessories
    WHHA
    This image is a composite of various first ladies in inaugural ball gowns and mannequins with dresses and gowns specially made for them by women designers, seamstresses, and courtiers. This image was featured in the digital exhibition "Glamour and Innovation: Women Behind the Seams of White House Fashion." *** This image contains images that requires licensing and may only be used for press and publicity purposes related to exhibit. All other uses must be approved by the White House Historical Association and cleared by the copyright holder.***
  • First Ladies Composite
    White House Historical Association
    fashion
    clothing & accessories
    WHHA
    This image is a composite of various first ladies in inaugural ball gowns and mannequins with dresses and gowns specially made for them by women designers, seamstresses, and courtiers. This image was featured in the digital exhibition "Glamour and Innovation: Women Behind the Seams of White House Fashion." *** This image contains images that requires licensing and may only be used for press and publicity purposes related to exhibit. All other uses must be approved by the White House Historical Association and cleared by the copyright holder.***
  • Mrs. Ford with Designer Frankie Welch
    Karl Schumacher
    fashion
    clothing & accessories
    Second Floor
    West Sitting Hall
    White House Guests
    This photograph of First Lady Betty Ford with designer Frankie Welch was taken by Karl Schumacher in the West Sitting Hall on February 15, 1975. Welch was one of the first designers to design “across the aisle,” creating gowns and scarves for first ladies Pat Nixon, Lady Bird Johnson, and Rosalynn Carter in addition to Mrs. Ford. After earning a degree in clothing and design at Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina, Welch relocated with her husband to Maryland, where she taught “clothes coordination” classes at the local university. Welch’s work is frequently described as “Americana,” and she often used the proceeds of her designs to give back to communities. Welch integrated her love of American culture and history in her designs, leaving a unique mark on the lexicon of American fashion.
  • Jerry Smith
    C. M. Bell
    portrait
    staff
    Residence staff
    This portrait photograph is of White House staff member Jeremiah "Jerry" Smith. Smith started working at the White House during the Ulysses S. Grant administration in the late 1860s, and served as butler, cook, doorman, and footman until his retirement some 35 years later. Shortly before dying at age 69 in 1904, Smith was visited at his home by President Theodore Roosevelt.
  • Mrs. Ford in the Treaty Room
    David Hume Kennerly
    Second Floor
    Treaty Room
    fashion
    clothing & accessories
    In this photograph, taken by David Hume Kennelly, First Lady Betty Ford poses in the Treaty Room on December 24, 1975. The Treaty Room is located on the Second Floor of the Executive Mansion and is used as the president’s private study. Mrs. Ford is wearing a dress designed by Frankie Welch.
  • Sally Milgrim Advertisement in Shadowland Magazine
    M. P. Publishing Company
    fashion
    clothing & accessories
    This print advertisement for H. Milgrim & Bros., Inc. was published in Shadowland magazine circa September 1919 to February 1920. The ensemble in the photograph features the "autumn silhouette" complete with a fur neck wrap and black hat. The ensemble was likely created Sally Milgrim. Milgrim got her start in fashion by joining her husband’s suit-making business as a dressmaker in the 1910s. By the 1920s, her business proved to be so successful that she began creating custom designs for entertainers like Ethel Merman, Pearl White, and Mary Pickford. Milgrim’s line expanded to include eveningwear as well as ready-to-wear gowns and accessories. A high point in Milgrim’s career was when she was approached to design Eleanor Roosevelt’s inaugural gown for Franklin D. Roosevelt’s 1933 inauguration.
  • Sally Milgrim Dress in Fashion Spread
    Unknown
    fashion
    clothing & accessories
    This editorial fashion spread was created in August 1921. The dress at the bottom left is by designer Sally Milgrim. Milgrim got her start in fashion by joining her husband’s suit-making business as a dressmaker in the 1910s. By the 1920s, her business proved to be so successful that she began creating custom designs for entertainers like Ethel Merman, Pearl White, and Mary Pickford. Milgrim’s line expanded to include eveningwear as well as ready-to-wear gowns and accessories. Milgrim’s attention to detail was apparent in her creations – she often incorporated embroidery, cross-stitch, ruffles, pleats, and embedded crystals. A high point in Milgrim’s career was when she was approached to design Eleanor Roosevelt’s inaugural gown for Franklin D. Roosevelt’s 1933 inauguration.
  • The Wedding of John and Jacqueline Kennedy
    Toni Frissell
    weddings
    celebrations
    Rhode Island
    This photograph was taken by Toni Frissell at the wedding of John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Bouvier on September 12, 1953 in Newport, Rhode Island. The future president and first lady were married at St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church followed by a reception (seen here) at Hammersmith Farm, the 300 acre oceanfront estate owned by the Auchincloss family. Hugh D. Auchincloss was Jacqueline's stepfather. Mrs. Kennedy's dress was designed by Ann Lowe.
  • President and Mrs. Kennedy Arrive at Inaugural Ball
    Abbie Rowe
    inaugurations
    In this photograph by Abbie Rowe taken on January 20, 1961, newly-inaugurated President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy arrive at the National Guard Armory in Washington, D.C. for the Inaugural Ball. Earlier in the day, President Kennedy was sworn in at the 35th President of the United States. Mrs. Kennedy wore a sleeveless, off-white gown with a silk sheer top covering a strapless bodice encrusted with “brilliants” and embroidered with silver thread by Ethel Frankau. Mrs. Kennedy collaborated with Frankau in the creation of the gown by offering suggestions on the sketches. Mrs. Kennedy’s look was finished off with a matching cape that closed at the neck and elbow-length gloves.
  • Sally Milgrim Dress in Shadowland Magazine
    E.V. Brewster Publications Inc.
    fashion
    clothing & accessories
    This editorial photograph was featured in a July 1921 issue of Shadowland magazine. The dress in the photograph is a black and white checkered afternoon gown with ribbon trimming by Sally Milgrim. Milgrim got her start in fashion by joining her husband’s suit-making business as a dressmaker in the 1910s. By the 1920s, her business proved to be so successful that she began creating custom designs for entertainers like Ethel Merman, Pearl White, and Mary Pickford. Milgrim’s line expanded to include eveningwear as well as ready-to-wear gowns and accessories. Milgrim’s attention to detail was apparent in her creations – she often incorporated embroidery, cross-stitch, ruffles, pleats, and embedded crystals. A high point in Milgrim’s career was when she was approached to design Eleanor Roosevelt’s inaugural gown for Franklin D. Roosevelt’s 1933 inauguration.
  • Sleeveless Black Cocktail Dress, Ann Lowe
    Ann Lowe
    textile
    clothing & accessories
    fashion
    This dress was created by Ann Lowe, a dressmaker, seamstress, and couturier who designed the wedding dress of future first lady Jacqueline Kennedy for her wedding to John F. Kennedy on September 12, 1953. Like many of Lowe’s other creations, this black sleeveless cocktail dress demonstrates her love for floral decorations. The bodice is made from black chiffon and the neckline is trimmed with green vines and pink roses made of satin. The green cummerbund of the bodice overlays a tightly pleated, full chiffon skirt. The dress has a zipper closure in the back that starts at the top of the bodice and ends below the waist.
  • Sally Milgrim Portrait
    Bain News Service
    fashion
    clothing & accessories
    portrait
    This black and white photograph of designer Sally Milgrim was taken circa 1920 - 1925 aboard a ship. Milgrim got her start in fashion by joining her husband’s suit-making business as a dressmaker in the 1910s. By the 1920s, her business proved to be so successful that she began creating custom designs for entertainers like Ethel Merman, Pearl White, and Mary Pickford. Milgrim’s line expanded to include eveningwear as well as ready-to-wear gowns and accessories. Milgrim’s attention to detail was apparent in her creations – she often incorporated embroidery, cross-stitch, ruffles, pleats, and embedded crystals. A high point in Milgrim’s career was when she was approached to design Eleanor Roosevelt’s inaugural gown for Franklin D. Roosevelt’s 1933 inauguration.
  • Mrs. Ford's Dark Pink Brocade Gown
    Frankie Welch
    fashion
    clothing & accessories
    textile
    First Lady Betty Ford wore this dark pink brocade gown by designer Frankie Welch twice during the 1974 holiday season. The gown features detailed gold embroidery of chrysanthemums throughout with a V neck in front and a high-neck collar influenced by the traditional cheongsam dress.
  • Newlywed Mrs. Kennedy Tosses Her Bouquet
    Toni Frissell
    Rhode Island
    celebrations
    weddings
    This photograph was taken by Toni Frissell at the wedding of John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Bouvier on September 12, 1953 in Newport, Rhode Island. The future president and first lady were married at St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church followed by a reception at Hammersmith Farm, the 300 acre oceanfront estate owned by the Auchincloss family. Hugh D. Auchincloss was Jacqueline's stepfather. Here, the newlywed Mrs. Kennedy tosses her bouquet at the reception. Mrs. Kennedy's wedding dress was designed by Ann Lowe.
  • Mrs. Ford's Green Satin Gown with Embroidery and Sequins
    Frankie Welch
    fashion
    clothing & accessories
    textile
    This green satin gown is a recreation of an identical gown made by designer Frankie Welch for First Lady Betty Ford. Since there were no inaugural celebrations when President Gerald R. Ford was sworn into office following Richard M. Nixon’s resignation, Mrs. Ford wore this gown to two state dinners at the White House, as well as several other events. The gown, in Mrs. Ford’s favorite shade of green, features an embroidered surface design in a chrysanthemum pattern and sequins sewn throughout. The symmetry of the high neck and the deep V neckline was a very fashionable silhouette for the time.
  • Harvey Berin Dress by Karen Stark
    Karen Stark
    Harvey Berin
    fashion
    clothing & accessories
    textile
    This dress was created by designer Karen Stark under the Harvey Berin label circa 1960. The dress is made of silk with a floral pink and black design. The back features a V neckline with bows adorning at both the bottom of the V and at the sash encircling the waist. Stark was the lead designer under the design house of Harvey Berin for nearly fifty years. Stark’s designs for Harvey Berin featured flattering, feminine silhouettes with clean lines and sturdy materials. They were also less complicated and more functional than what French designers at the time were creating. First Lady Pat Nixon selected one of Stark's designs for Harvey Berin for her 1969 inaugural ball gown.
  • Mrs. Ford's Lemon-Yellow Chiffon Gown
    Frankie Welch
    fashion
    clothing & accessories
    textile
    First Lady Betty Ford wore this lemon-yellow chiffon Frankie Welch gown for a state dinner with Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel in September 1974. This gown features a yellow, sheer chiffon layer with polka dots over a solid yellow spaghetti strapped dress. There are ruffles at the neckline, hem, and sleeves, and a satin bow around the waist. The gown closes with a zipper closure up the center back.
  • Teal Blue Dress and Cropped Jacket, Ann Lowe
    Ann Lowe
    textile
    clothing & accessories
    fashion
    This dress was created by Ann Lowe, a dressmaker, seamstress, and couturier who designed the wedding dress of future first lady Jacqueline Kennedy for her wedding to John F. Kennedy on September 12, 1953. This teal blue silk brocade dress and matching cropped jacket were designed by Lowe in the 1950s and was worn by Florence Colgate Rumbough Trevor, a member of high society. This dress features a V neckline, a fitted bodice, and a small train in the back. This structured silhouette and complex tailoring of this ensemble are evidence of Lowe’s outstanding artistry.
  • Mrs. Lincoln's Purple Velvet Dress (Daytime Bodice)
    Elizabeth Keckley
    fashion
    textile
    clothing & accessories
    This purple velvet dress by Elizabeth Keckley was created for First Lady Mary Lincoln during the 1861-1862 winter social season in Washington, D.C. Keckley designed the ensemble to include a skirt and two bodices -- one for the daytime and one for the evening. The daytime bodice, seen here, features white satin piping and mother of pearl buttons. Keckley, who was born enslaved, frequently designed dresses for Mrs. Lincoln. The two developed both a business partnership during Mrs. Lincoln's time in the White House as well as a friendship during that time. To see the evening bodice, see image 1135054.
  • Stars and Stripes Slippers, Elizabeth Keckley
    Elizabeth Keckley
    fashion
    clothing & accessories
    textile
    These men’s stars and stripes boudoir slippers are attributed to Elizabeth Keckley. These were likely commissioned in circa 1865 by Mrs. Gideon Welles as a gift for her husband, Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy under President Abraham Lincoln. The body of the shoes is composed of red and white crochet stripes with a navy band and scattered white stars across the vamp. They contain a flat, leather sole and are edged in a twisted blue and red cord. Keckley, who was born enslaved, frequently designed dresses for First Lady Mary Lincoln. The two developed both a business partnership during Mrs. Lincoln's time in the White House as well as a friendship during that time.
  • Mrs. Lincoln's Purple Velvet Dress (Evening Bodice)
    Elizabeth Keckley
    fashion
    textile
    clothing & accessories
    This purple velvet dress by Elizabeth Keckley was created for First Lady Mary Lincoln during the 1861-1862 winter social season in Washington, D.C. Keckley designed the ensemble to include a skirt and two bodices -- one for the daytime and one for the evening. The evening bodice, seen here, features white satin piping and black and white lace-decorated sleeves. Keckley, who was born enslaved, frequently designed dresses for Mrs. Lincoln. The two developed both a business partnership during Mrs. Lincoln's time in the White House as well as a friendship during that time. To see the daytime bodice, see image 1135052.
  • Cream Silk Dress, Ann Lowe
    Ann Lowe
    textile
    clothing & accessories
    fashion
    This dress was created by Ann Lowe, a dressmaker, seamstress, and couturier who designed the wedding dress of future first lady Jacqueline Kennedy for her wedding to John F. Kennedy on September 12, 1953. This dress was made in 1958 and was worn by Patricia Schieffer. It is made from cream silk faille and features embroidered floral appliqué embellishments throughout. The bodice has cap sleeves and a scoop neck front and back. An excellent example of Lowe’s gift for dress construction, this dress features boning sewn at regular intervals throughout to provide structure and support. Pannier-like structures underneath the petticoat provide fullness to the skirt.
  • President and Dr. Biden in the 2022 Reading Nook
    Tony Powell
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    Easter Egg Roll
    holidays
    In this photograph, taken by Tony Powell for the White House Historical Association, President Joseph R. Biden and First Lady Dr. Jill Biden read to a group of children in the reading nook at the 2022 White House Easter Egg Roll. The Easter Egg Roll took place on April 18, 2022 and was the first held in person on the the South Grounds of the White House since 2019, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Activities at the annual celebration included the traditional Easter egg roll and egg hunt, costumed characters, food, and arts and crafts, among others activities.
  • President and Dr. Biden in the 2022 Reading Nook
    Tony Powell
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    Easter Egg Roll
    holidays
    In this photograph, taken by Tony Powell for the White House Historical Association, President Joseph R. Biden and First Lady Dr. Jill Biden read to a group of children in the reading nook at the 2022 White House Easter Egg Roll. The Easter Egg Roll took place on April 18, 2022 and was the first held in person on the the South Grounds of the White House since 2019, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Activities at the annual celebration included the traditional Easter egg roll and egg hunt, costumed characters, food, and arts and crafts, among others activities.
  • President and Dr. Biden in the 2022 Reading Nook
    Tony Powell
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    Easter Egg Roll
    holidays
    In this photograph, taken by Tony Powell for the White House Historical Association, President Joseph R. Biden and First Lady Dr. Jill Biden read to a group of children in the reading nook at the 2022 White House Easter Egg Roll. The Easter Egg Roll took place on April 18, 2022 and was the first held in person on the the South Grounds of the White House since 2019, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Activities at the annual celebration included the traditional Easter egg roll and egg hunt, costumed characters, food, and arts and crafts, among others activities.