• Lynda Johnson and Chuck Robb Cutting Wedding Cake
    Unknown
    wedding
    military
    East Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of Lynda Johnson and Capt. Charles S. Robb cutting their wedding cake was taken on December 9, 1967 in the East Room. Per Marine Corps tradition, the couple uses a saber to cut through the five-layer cake, as they become the 15th couple to be married in the White House. Immediately following the cake-cutting ceremony, the couple performed their first dance.
  • Egyptian-Israeli Peace Treaty is Signed on the North Lawn
    Unknown
    Head of State
    North Lawn
    This is a photograph of President Jimmy Carter clasping hands with Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin at the signing of the Egypt-Israeli Peace Treaty on the North Lawn, March 26, 1979.
  • Something Old, Something New Composite
    White House Historical Association
    WHHA
    weddings
    flowers
    This composite image of floral prints and photographs of wedding bouquets was featured in the digital exhibit entitled "Something Old, Something New: Eight First Daughters’ Fashionable White House Weddings." It may only be used for press and publicity purposes related to the exhibit. All other uses must be approved by the White House Historical Association in writing.
  • East Room Decorated for the Roosevelt-Longworth Wedding
    Harris & Ewing
    weddings
    State Floor
    East Room
    celebrations
    decorations
    In this photograph, the East Room of the White House is elegantly decorated for the wedding of Alice Roosevelt to Nicholas Longworth, which took place on February 17, 1906. Alice Roosevelt, daughter of President Theodore Roosevelt and Alice Lee Roosevelt, married Longworth, a member of the House of Representatives from the state of Ohio, before an estimated one thousand guests in attendance. The dais, pictured here, was set up along the large window on the east side of the room. Astilbe japonicas, palm fronds, Easter lilies, greenhouse smilax, asparagus vines, bride roses, and rhododendrons filled the room and white satin ribbons covered the ropes that created the aisle amongst all of the invited guests.
  • Jessie Woodrow Wilson and Francis Bowes Sayre's Wedding Cake
    Bain News Service
    celebrations
    weddings
    Family Dining Room
    State Floor
    This is a photograph of a wedding cake created for the wedding of Jessie Woodrow Wilson to Francis Bowes Sayre. Jessie Wilson, the daughter of President Woodrow Wilson and First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson, married Sayre in the East Room of the White House on November 25, 1913. The Wilson-Sayre wedding cake was decorated in the popular Art Nouveau style of the day with flowing, rhythmic lines and floral motifs, which embraced nature. The cake was served in the private Family Dining Room to only 20 of the couples’ closest friends and family as the dinner party continued in the State Dining Room for the remaining guests.
  • Flower Girls for the Wilson-McAdoo Wedding
    Harris & Ewing
    celebrations
    weddings
    This photograph captures two flower girls dressed in their wedding ensembles with baskets of flowers for the wedding ceremony of Eleanor Wilson and William G. McAdoo (sometimes referred to as W. G. McAdoo). Eleanor Wilson, daughter of President Woodrow Wilson and First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson, married McAdoo, President Wilson's secretary of the Treasury, in the East Room of the White House on May 7, 1914. The flower girls were likely dressed in custom Kurzman dresses. It is believed that Kurzman created the gowns for Eleanor’s trousseau as well as the whole family.
  • President Roosevelt with Newlyweds Alice Roosevelt and Nicholas Longworth
    C. L. Wasson
    celebrations
    weddings
    This stereograph of President Theodore Roosevelt, right, with his daughter Alice Roosevelt Longworth and her husband, Nicholas Longworth, left, was taken by C. L. Wasson. Longworth, a member of the House of Representatives from Ohio who went on to become Speaker of the House, married Alice Roosevelt in the East Room of the White House on February 17, 1906. The trio was captured surrounded by an array of palms and lilies, among other fronds and flowers. Alice’s wedding gown was made of American materials: a pure white heavy satin foundation with corded satin along the seams. Rare old point lace trimmings on the bodice and sleeves were embellished by clusters of orange blossoms. A four-yard court train in white brocade satin in a lily pattern trailed behind the bride. To ensure that Alice’s gown could not be copied, the loom cards used to create the brocade weaving pattern of Alice's dress were destroyed when the fabric was completed.
  • Wedding Portrait of Jessie Woodrow Wilson Sayre
    Unknown
    celebrations
    weddings
    Second Floor
    This portrait photograph of Jessie Woodrow Wilson Sayre in her wedding gown was taken on November 25, 1913. Jessie, daughter of President Woodrow Wilson and First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson, married Francis Bowes Sayre on that day in a ceremony in the East Room of the White House. Photographed on the Second Floor of the White House, in either the East or West Sitting Room, Jessie is wearing a wedding gown made of white silk satin woven at the Pelgram and Meyer silk mill in Paterson, New Jersey. The skirt of the gown was narrow at the ankle but had slashes cut in the back, which were hidden by the court train, in order to make it easier for Jessie to walk down the aisle.
  • Alice Roosevelt Longworth's Wedding Bouquet
    Unknown
    celebrations
    flowers
    weddings
    This photograph of Alice Roosevelt Longworth's wedding bouquet was taken circa March 9, 1906. Alice, daughter of President Theodore Roosevelt and Alice Lee Roosevelt, married Nicholas Longworth, a member of the House of Representatives from Ohio, weeks earlier during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House on February 17, 1906. Alice’s wedding bouquet was composed of rare varieties of white orchids and maidenhair fern in a cascade fashion, a popular English style of the time. The blossoms were tied together at the stem with white chiffon satin ribbon that extended into the floral cascade. After the ceremony, Alice gave flowers from the bouquet to some of her friends.
  • Wedding Portrait of Jessie Woodrow Wilson Sayre and Francis Bowes Sayre
    Unknown
    weddings
    celebrations
    Second Floor
    This portrait photograph of newlyweds Jessie Woodrow Wilson Sayre and Francis Bowes Sayre in their wedding ensembles was taken on November 25, 1913. Jessie, daughter of President Woodrow Wilson and First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson, married Sayre on that day in a ceremony in the East Room of the White House. Photographed on the Second Floor of the White House, in either the East or West Sitting Room, Jessie is wearing a wedding gown made of white silk satin woven at the Pelgram and Meyer silk mill in Paterson, New Jersey. The skirt of the gown was narrow at the ankle but had slashes cut in the back, which were hidden by the court train, in order to make it easier for Jessie to walk down the aisle.
  • Wedding Portrait of Alice Roosevelt Longworth
    Edward S. Curtis
    celebrations
    weddings
    This portrait photograph of Alice Roosevelt Longworth in her wedding ensemble was taken by Edward S. Curtis around February 19, 1906. Alice Roosevelt Longworth, the daughter of President Theodore Roosevelt and Alice Lee Roosevelt, married Nicholas Longworth in a ceremony in the East Room of the White House on February 17, 1906. Longworth, a member of the House of Representatives from Ohio, would eventually serve as Speaker of the House during his career. Alice’s wedding gown was made of American materials: a pure white heavy satin foundation with corded satin along the seams. Rare old point lace trimmings on the bodice and sleeves were embellished by clusters of orange blossoms. A four-yard court train in white brocade satin in a lily pattern trailed behind the bride. In an attempt to make sure Alice’s gown could not be copied, the loom cards used to create the brocade weaving pattern were destroyed when the fabric was completed.
  • Wedding Portrait of Alice Roosevelt Longworth
    Frances Benjamin Johnston
    celebrations
    weddings
    This portrait photograph of Alice Roosevelt Longworth in her wedding ensemble was taken by Frances Benjamin Johnston. Alice Roosevelt Longworth, the daughter of President Theodore Roosevelt and Alice Lee Roosevelt, married Nicholas Longworth in a ceremony in the East Room of the White House on February 17, 1906. Longworth, a member of the House of Representatives from Ohio, would eventually serve as Speaker of the House during his career. Alice Roosevelt Longworth's wedding dress featured rare old point lace that trimmed the neckline and elbow-length sleeves of her gown. The lace had been used on her mother when she married Theodore Roosevelt in 1880. The use of the lace was a nod toward her mother, who died two days after Alice was born.
  • Wedding Portrait of Eleanor Wilson McAdoo
    Harris & Ewing
    celebrations
    weddings
    This portrait photograph of Eleanor Wilson McAdoo in her wedding gown was taken by Harris & Ewing. Eleanor Wilson McAdoo, daughter of President Woodrow Wilson and First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson, married William G. McAdoo (sometimes referred to as W. G. McAdoo) in the East Room of the White House on May 7, 1914. McAdoo served as the secretary of the Treasury during the Woodrow Wilson administration. Eleanor Wilson McAdoo wore an ivory white satin fabric for the base of her wedding gown, which was custom-made by New York designer Charles Kurzman of Kurzman of Fifth Avenue. The dress featured a v-shaped neckline, long sleeves of tulle, a three and a half foot-long train, and was trimmed with rare old point lace. Her tulle veil attached to a cap with orange blossoms and carried a bouquet of orange blossoms, white lilies of the valley, and white orchids.
  • President Nixon Walks Tricia Nixon Down the Aisle
    Jack E. Kightlinger
    celebrations
    weddings
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    In this photograph by Jack E. Kightlinger, President Richard M. Nixon walks his eldest daughter, Tricia Nixon, down the aisle at her wedding on June 12, 1971. Tricia Nixon married Edward Cox at a ceremony in the Rose Garden on the White House Grounds, followed by a reception in the East Room. A gazebo was built for the ceremony, which was conducted by the Rev. Dr. Edward Latch. The greenery of the Rose Garden was dotted with roses of reds, pinks, whites, and yellows. The shade of green of the crabapple trees throughout was said to match the shade of the bridesmaids’ layered silk organdy dresses, made by Priscilla of Boston. Though there was an intimate number of invited guests, just beyond it, on the South Lawn, press tents captured the nuptials for the nation.
  • East Room Decorated for the Wilson-Sayre Wedding
    Harris & Ewing
    weddings
    celebrations
    State Floor
    East Room
    decorations
    In this photograph, the East Room of the White House is decorated for the wedding of Jessie Woodrow Wilson, daughter of President Woodrow Wilson and First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson, to Francis Bowes Sayre on November 25, 1913. The ceremony took place at an altar constructed in the East Room surrounded by palms, maidenhair ferns, and annunciation lilies, which complemented Jessie’s bouquet.
  • Lynda Bird Johnson and Charles S. Robb Wedding Portrait
    O. J. Rapp
    celebrations
    weddings
    Second Floor
    Yellow Oval Room
    In this photograph by O. J. Rapp, Lynda Bird Johnson, daughter of President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson, poses alongside her husband, Marine Corps Capt. Charles S. Robb, following their wedding ceremony on December 9, 1967. The couple, photographed here in the Yellow Oval Room, was married in East Room of the White House. Lynda's wedding gown was designed by Geoffrey Beene and featured a high-necked, long sleeve narrow A-line type dress, made full by a center pleat down the back. The gown was made of pearl white Abraham silk satin in an internationally distinguished Swiss mill.
  • Wedding Ceremony of Lynda Bird Johnson and Charles S. Robb
    Robert L. Knudsen
    celebrations
    weddings
    State Floor
    East Room
    In this photograph by Robert L. Knudsen, Lynda Bird Johnson, daughter of President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson, stands at the altar alongside her groom, Marine Corps Capt. Charles S. Robb, on their wedding day, December 9, 1967. The Johnson-Robb wedding took place in the East Room of the White House. Lynda's younger sister, Luci Baines Johnson, in red at right, served as maid of honor while Reverend Canon Gerald N.McAllister, far right, performed the wedding ceremony. Lynda wore a white silk satin-paneled wedding gown designed by Geoffrey Beene featuring embellished vertical lines of silk floss, embroidered flowers, and delicate seed pearls. Her wedding ensemble was topped with a 15-yard-long tulle veil.
  • President Johnson Descends Grand Staircase with Daughter Lynda
    Michael Geissinger
    celebrations
    weddings
    State Floor
    Grand Staircase
    Entrance Hall
    In this photograph by Michael Geissinger, President Lyndon B. Johnson and his eldest daughter, Lynda Bird Johnson, descend the Grand Staircase of the White House on the afternoon of her wedding on December 9, 1967. The Grand Staircase connects the first family's private residence on the Second Floor down to the Entrance Hall, seen here, on the State Floor. Lynda's wedding to Marine Corps Capt. Charles S. Robb took place in the East Room of the White House. The President’s cutaway suit jacket and striped trousers stand in stark contrast to Lynda’s white silk satin-paneled gown and her 15-yard-long tulle veil seen trailing behind them.
  • Newlyweds Lynda Bird Johnson and Charles S. Robb Lead Recessional
    Michael Geissinger
    weddings
    celebrations
    State Floor
    East Room
    Cross Hall
    military
    In this photograph by Michael Geissinger, newlyweds Lynda Bird Johnson and Charles S. Robb lead a recessional following their wedding ceremony on December 9, 1967. Lynda, daughter of President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson, married Robb, a Marine Corps captain, in the East Room of the White House. Lynda's wedding gown was designed by Geoffrey Beene and featured a high-necked, long sleeve narrow A-line type dress, made full by a center pleat down the back. The gown was made of pearl white Abraham silk satin in an internationally distinguished Swiss mill.
  • President and Mrs. Johnson Pose with the Johnson-Robb Wedding Party
    Frank Wolfe
    Yellow Oval Room
    Second Floor
    celebrations
    weddings
    In this photograph by Frank Wolfe, President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson pose with their daughter, Lynda Bird Johnson, on her wedding day on December 9, 1967. The Johnsons are joined by Lynda's groom, Marine Corps Capt. Charles S. Robb, her younger sister, Luci Baines Johnson, to the right of Mrs. Johnson, and the wedding party in the Yellow Oval Room on the Second Floor of the White House. This photograph was captured following Lynda and Charles' ceremony in the East Room. Along with the bridal ensemble, Geoffrey Beene designed the bridesmaids’ red velvet dresses which were inspired by Francisco Goya’s 1787-1788 painting Manuel Osorio Manrique de Zúñiga and reflected the medieval aesthetic popularized by the 1967 film Camelot.
  • Lynda Bird Johnson and Charles S. Robb Cut Their Wedding Cake
    Yoichi R. Okamoto
    weddings
    celebrations
    State Floor
    East Room
    military
    In this photograph by Yoichi R. Okamoto, Lynda Bird Johnson and Marine Corps Capt. Charles S. Robb use a saber to cut their wedding cake while her parents, President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson, look on. Johnson and Robb were married in the East Room of the White House, where they also cut their cake, on December 9, 1967. Per Marine Corps tradition, the couple uses a saber to cut through the five-layer cake, as they became the 15th couple to be married in the White House. Immediately following the cake-cutting ceremony, the couple performed their first dance.
  • Wedding Portrait of Tricia Nixon Cox
    Dick Winburn
    celebrations
    weddings
    State Floor
    Cross Hall
    Blue Room
    This black and white copy of Tricia Nixon's formal wedding portrait was created on June 25, 1971. Tricia Nixon, the daughter of President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon, married Edward Cox in a Rose Garden ceremony on June 12, 1971. The original photograph was taken by Dick Winburn. In the portrait, Tricia Nixon is captured in the doorway separating the Cross Hall and, behind her, the Blue Room on the State Floor of the White House. An American flag is to the right and a flag with the Presidential Seal is on the left.
  • Tricia Nixon and Edward Cox Dance at their Wedding Reception
    Oliver F. Atkins
    weddings
    celebrations
    State Floor
    East Room
    In this photograph by Oliver F. Atkins, Tricia Nixon, the daughter of President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon, dances with Edward Cox at their wedding reception on June 12, 1971. The newlywed couple danced to "Somewhere, My Love" from the movie Doctor Zhivago for their first dance. The wedding reception took place in the East Room of the White House following a ceremony outside in the Rose Garden. Tricia Nixon's wedding ensemble was designed by Priscilla Kidder with the bride's input and featured a juliet cap and illusion silk veil.
  • Tricia Nixon and Edward Cox Dance at their Wedding Reception
    Oliver F. Atkins
    weddings
    celebrations
    State Floor
    East Room
    In this photograph by Oliver F. Atkins, Tricia Nixon, the daughter of President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon, dances with Edward Cox at their wedding reception on June 12, 1971. The newlywed couple danced to "Somewhere, My Love" from the movie Doctor Zhivago for their first dance. The wedding reception took place in the East Room of the White House following a ceremony outside in the Rose Garden. Tricia Nixon's wedding ensemble was designed by Priscilla Kidder with the bride's input and featured a juliet cap and illusion silk veil.
  • Tricia Nixon and Edward Cox Dance at their Wedding Reception
    Oliver F. Atkins
    weddings
    celebrations
    State Floor
    East Room
    In this photograph by Oliver F. Atkins, Tricia Nixon, the daughter of President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon, dances with Edward Cox at their wedding reception on June 12, 1971. The newlywed couple danced to "Somewhere, My Love" from the movie Doctor Zhivago for their first dance. The wedding reception took place in the East Room of the White House following a ceremony outside in the Rose Garden. Tricia Nixon's wedding ensemble was designed by Priscilla Kidder with the bride's input and featured a juliet cap and illusion silk veil.