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  • Margaret Woodrow Wilson
    Unknown
    portraits
    First Family
    This black-and-white photographic portrait of Margaret Woodrow Wilson was taken around October 1, 1912. Margaret Woodrow Wilson was the eldest of President Woodrow Wilson’s three daughters, born in Georgia on April 16, 1886. In 1913, the Wilsons moved into the White House, but Margaret’s mother and first lady, Ellen Axson Wilson, passed away the next year. Margaret stepped in as White House hostess until her father married Edith Bolling Galt in 1915. Later in life, Margaret Wilson made a spiritual journey to India and lived in an ashram until her death in 1944.
  • Margaret Woodrow Wilson
    Unknown
    portrait
    first family
    This photograph of Margaret Woodrow Wilson was taken in 1900. Margaret Woodrow Wilson was the eldest of President Woodrow Wilson’s three daughters, born in Georgia on April 16, 1886. In 1913, the Wilsons moved into the White House, but Margaret’s mother and first lady, Ellen Axson Wilson, passed away the next year. Margaret stepped in as White House hostess until her father married Edith Bolling Galt in 1915. Later in life, Margaret Wilson made a spiritual journey to India and lived in an ashram until her death in 1944.
  • President Wilson Throws out First Pitch, Opening Day 1916
    National Photo Company
    sports
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph of President Woodrow Wilson was taken on April 20, 1916 on Opening Day at Nationals Park in Washington, D.C. President Wilson threw the first pitch at the game, where the Washington Senators would go on to defeat the New York Yankees, 12-4. First Lady Edith Bolling Galt Wilson, seated immediately to President Wilson’s right, accompanied her husband to the game.
  • President Wilson Attends a Baseball Game
    Harris & Ewing
    sports
    Washington, D.C.
    Presidential Visit
    This photograph shows President Woodrow Wilson attending the opening game of the baseball season on April 14, 1915. President Wilson threw out the first ball for the Washington Senators’ opening day games on both April 14, 1915, and April 20, 1916. In each match, the Washington Senators defeated the New York Yankees. The widower president attended both games with Edith Bolling Galt, who he married in December of 1915.
  • President Wilson Throws Opening Pitch for Washington Senators Baseball Team
    Unknown
    sports
    Washington, D.C.
    Presidential Visit
    This photograph shows President Woodrow Wilson throwing the first pitch at the opening game of the baseball season on April 20, 1916. President Wilson threw out the first ball for the Washington Senators’ opening day games on both April 14, 1915, and April 20, 1916. In each match, the Washington Senators defeated the New York Yankees. The president attended both games with Edith Bolling Galt, who he married in December of 1915.
  • Woodrow Wilson and Prize Rooster Winners
    Harris & Ewing
    Alabama
    White House Guests
    World War I
    This photograph is of President Woodrow Wilson with the "Big Four" prize roosters representing the premiers of the victorious powers in World War I outside the main door to the Executive Offices, later known as the West Wing. These roosters were purchased in France and, with a fifth bird (also depicted) that Wilson purchased, would be sold at auction to benefit highway-building in Alabama.
  • Woodrow Wilson
    Bureau of Engraving and Printing
    portrait
    engraving
    This engraving of President Woodrow Wilson was produced by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. Wilson served as 28th president of the United States from 1913-1921. Prior to his election, Wilson had served as president of Princeton University and governor of New Jersey. As president, Wilson oversaw American entry into World War I and founded the League of Nations.
  • Woodrow Wilson
    Herbert E. French
    Washington
    D.C.
    This photograph, possibly taken by Herbert E. French, shows former President Woodrow Wilson standing in front of his Washington, D.C. home after his presidency. The President and his wife, First Lady Edith Bolling Galt Wilson, moved into the house located at 2340 S Street in the Kalorama neighborhood of northwest Washington, D.C. after the completion of this second term in office. The house is now listed as a site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.
  • Wilson Addressing a Joint Session of Congress
    Harris & Ewing
    Congress
    This photograph by Harris & Ewing shows President Woodrow Wilson addressing a joint session of Congress. Seated behind President Wilson are Vice President Thomas R. Marshall and Speaker of the House James Beauchamp Clark, more commonly known as Champ Clark. President Wilson gave a number of speeches to Congress, eight of which were an annual message to the country.
  • Woodrow Wilson
    Harris & Ewing
    portrait
    This photograph is a portrait of President Woodrow Wilson taken around the time of his term in office. In the photograph, President Wilson is seen wearing his trademark pince-nez glasses.
  • Woodrow Wilson
    Udo J. Keppler
    portrait
    This portrait illustration of President Woodrow Wilson was done by Udo J. Keppler and was published in a book by Puck Press. The illustration spans the width of two pages, continuing over the fold of the book.
  • Woodrow Wilson
    Harris & Ewing
    portrait
    This portrait photograph of future President Woodrow Wilson was taken by Harris & Ewing in 1900 before he was president of Princeton University. Wilson served as president of the historic university from 1902-1910 before becoming governor of New Jersey and then President of the United States of America.
  • President Wilson with Allied Leaders
    Unknown
    World War I
    Head of State
    France
    Presidential Visit
    travel
    This photograph shows President Woodrow Wilson with the Prime Ministers of Great Britain, France, and Italy. These World War I leaders were known as the Big Four. Left to right: David Lloyd George (Britain), Vittorio Emanuele Orlando (Italy), Georges Clemenceau (France), and Woodrow Wilson. In 1919 the Big Four met in Paris, France to negotiate the Treaty of Versailles after the end of World War I. This photograph was taken outside the Hotel Crillon in Paris.
  • Woodrow Wilson
    Pach Brothers
    portrait
    This portrait of Woodrow Wilson was created by the Pach Brothers of New York in 1912. At the time, Wilson was governor of New Jersey in the midst of his 1912 presidential campaign and election.
  • Woodrow Wilson Bookplate
    Carl S. Junge
    bookplate
    This bookplate is a woodcut print that was designed by Carl S. Junge and shows Woodrow Wilson seated at a desk with the image of the cathedral Notre-Dame de Reims behind him. The text reads "Behind the clouds the sun is still shining/ Out of the darkness unity must come. Woodrow Wilson." President Wilson visited the cathedral, located 80 miles from Paris in Reims, while in France for the Paris Peace Conference.
  • Woodrow Wilson
    Edmonston
    portrait
    This photograph is a portrait of President Woodrow Wilson taken at the Edmonston studio in Washington, D.C. In the photograph, President Wilson is seen wearing his trademark pince-nez glasses.
  • Wilson Buying Christmas Seals
    Unknown
    transportation
    Christmas
    children
    This photograph shows former President Woodrow Wilson buying Christmas seals to support the fight against tuberculosis from Sylvia Suter, a young girl who served with the Modern Health Crusade. The image is a doctored image, with Suter standing on the running board of a car with a previously-taken image of President Wilson driving in his own car cut and inserted into the image. The original photograph of President Wilson was also taken in 1923.
  • President Wilson Holding His Granddaughter
    Barnett McFee Clinedinst
    First Family
    portraits
    This photograph by Barnett McFee Clinedinst shows President Woodrow Wilson holding his first granddaughter, Ellen McAdoo. Eleanor Wilson McAdoo, her mother, was the youngest daughter of President Wilson. In 1914 she married Secretary of the Treasury William Gibbs McAdoo, who served nearly the entire Wilson administration.
  • Edith Wilson Assists President Wilson
    Harris & Ewing
    Oval Office
    West Wing
    This photograph by Harris & Ewing shows President Woodrow Wilson working at his desk with First Lady Edith Wilson next to him. The image is the first photograph of President Wilson following an illness.
  • Woodrow and Edith Wilson
    Unknown
    transportation
    flowers
    This photograph shows President Woodrow Wilson and First Lady Edith Wilson in a car. Mrs. Wilson is holding a bouquet of flowers.
  • Jessie Wilson Sayre
    Edmonston
    weddings
    celebrations
    This photograph shows Jessie Wilson, daughter of President Woodrow Wilson, on her wedding day, November 25, 1913. Jessie married Francis Bowes Sayre, a Harvard-educated lawyer who would go on to serve as the United States ambassador to Siam, now known as Thailand, and assistant secretary of state during the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration. The two were married in the White House and their first child, Francis Sayre, Jr., was born there as well.
  • Feeding President Wilson's Sheep
    Office of the Secretary of Agriculture
    South Lawn
    pets
    South Grounds
    This photograph taken by the Office of the Secretary of Agriculture shows a man and small child feeding baby sheep on the South Lawn. The sign reads: "President Wilson's Sheep Are Listed in 'Better Sires - Better Stock' Campaign."
  • President Wilson and His Cabinet
    Photo Card Co.
    portrait
    Cabinet
    This postcard shows head-and-shoulders portraits of President Woodrow Wilson and members of his Cabinet during his second term in office. Among the members of his cabinet is William G. McAdoo, President Wilson's secretary of the treasury and son-in-law.
  • President and Mrs. Wilson Leaving by Car
    Harris & Ewing
    transportation
    This photograph by Harris & Ewing shows President Woodrow Wilson and First Lady Ellen Wilson, his first wife, leaving the White House by car.
  • Woodrow Wilson and Prize Rooster Winners
    Unknown
    World War I
    Alabama
    White House Guests
    This photograph is of President Woodrow Wilson with the "Big Four" prize roosters representing the premiers of the victorious powers in World War I outside the main door to the Executive Offices, later known as the West Wing. These roosters were purchased in France and, with a fifth bird (also depicted) that Wilson purchased, would be sold at auction to benefit highway-building in Alabama.