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  • President John F. Kennedy Meets with Civil Rights Leaders
    Warren K. Leffler
    Oval Office
    West Wing
    civil rights
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President John F. Kennedy meeting with civil rights leaders was taken by Warren K. Leffler on August 28, 1963. The leaders met with President Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson after participating in the March for Jobs and Freedom. This photograph shows (left to right): Mathew H. Ahmann, National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice; Whitney M. Young, National Urban League; Martin Luther King, Jr., Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC); John Lewis, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and future congressman for Georgia's 5th District; Rabbi Joachim Prinz, American Jewish Congress; Reverend Eugene Carson Blake, United Presbyterian Church; A. Philip Randolph, AFL-CIO; President John F. Kennedy; Walter Reuther, of the United Auto Workers, with Vice President Johnson partially visible behind him; and Roy Wilkins (NAACP). Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz and Floyd B. McKissick of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) were also present but are not shown.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Lyndon B. Johnson with Civil Rights Leaders in the Oval Office
    Yoichi R. Okamoto
    White House Guests
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    civil rights
    In this photograph, taken in the Oval Office on January 18, 1964 by Yoichi R. Okamoto, President Lyndon B. Johnson meets with a group of civil rights leaders. Among the group are the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (left), Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League (right), and James Farmer of the Congress of Racial Equality (far right).
  • President Johnson Listens to Recording from Capt. Charles S. Robb
    Jack E. Kightlinger
    technology
    West Wing
    Cabinet Room
    Vietnam War
    First Family
    In this photograph, taken by Jack E. Kightlinger on July 31, 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson sits by himself in the Cabinet Room listening to a recording sent by his son-in-law Capt. Charles S. Robb, who was deployed on active duty to Vietnam. The president is pictured hunched forward and facing downward, his forehead resting against his hand. On the far side of the room stands a bust depicting Johnson's predecessor, President John F. Kennedy.
  • President Johnson Signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965
    Yoichi R. Okamoto
    signing
    bills
    Washington, D.C.
    U.S. Capitol
    civil rights
    In this photograph, taken by Yoichi R. Okamoto on August 6, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965 in the President's Room of the Capitol building while Civil Rights leaders including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. look on. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • Johnson Family Christmas Portrait
    Frank Wolfe
    Yellow Oval Room
    winter holidays
    Christmas
    Second Floor
    pets
    First Family
    In this photograph, taken by Frank Wolfe on December 24, 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson poses with his growing family for a holiday portrait in the Yellow Oval Room. Seated from left: first daughter Luci Baines Johnson Nugent with her son Patrick Lyndon Nugent on her lap; First Lady Lady Bird Johnson; President Johnson with dog Yuki; and first daughter Lynda Bird Johnson Robb cradling infant daughter Lucinda Robb. The family's private Christmas tree is visible in the background. On the wall are paintings "The Forest" (left) and "House on the Marne" (right) by Post-Impressionist painter Paul Cézanne.
  • President and Mrs. Johnson with the Blue Room Christmas Tree
    Robert L. Knudsen
    winter holidays
    State Floor
    Blue Room Christmas Tree
    Blue Room
    decorations
    Christmas
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson posing by the Blue Room Christmas tree was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on December 13, 1966. For her third Christmas as first lady, Lady Bird Johnson decorated the tree with thousands of small traditional ornaments, including nuts, fruit, popcorn, dried seedpods, gingerbread cookies, and wood roses from Hawaii.
  • Vice President Johnson Attends Honorary Citizenship Churchill Ceremony
    George F. Mobley
    ceremony
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    This photograph, taken April 9, 1963 by George F. Mobley, shows Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson en route to the Rose Garden to attend a ceremony honoring former British prime minister Winston Churchill. President John F. Kennedy held the ceremony to offer honorary United States citizenship to Churchill in recognition for his leadership and friendship with the American people.
  • Lynda Bird Johnson and Charles Robb Wed in the East Room
    Unknown
    wedding
    State Floor
    First Family
    East Room
    military
    In this photograph, taken December 9, 1967, newlyweds Lynda Bird Johnson Robb and Capt. Charles S. Robb take their first steps together as man and wife following their wedding ceremony in the East Room of the White House. The ceremony was officiated by the Right Reverend Gerald Nicholas McAllister. This was the 15th wedding held at the White House. The couple enjoyed their wedding cake in the same room where they were married. During the ceremony, the cake was hidden behind a screen, which was removed when guests returned to the East Room for champagne, cake, and dancing. Fellow White House bride Alice Roosevelt Longworth, who married in 1906, was among the approximately 500 guests who attended the wedding. The bride's parents, President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson, can be seen watching proudly on the left side of this photograph. This photograph is part of a personal collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. As executive chef from 1966-1987, Haller oversaw the food preparations for three wedding receptions at the White House for first daughters Luci Baines Johnson, Lynda Bird Johnson, and Tricia Nixon.
  • President Lyndon B. Johnson with Yuki
    Unknown
    pets
    Texas
    In this photograph, President Lyndon B. Johnson sits on a fence at his Texas ranch, holding his beloved dog, Yuki. Yuki, a mixed breed stray, was discovered by President Johnson's daughter Luci Baines Johnson at a Texas gas station on Thanksgiving Day 1966. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Johnson Family in the Rose Garden
    Unknown
    South Grounds
    First Family
    Rose Garden
    In this photograph, likely taken in 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson stands with his growing family in the Rose Garden. From left: First Lady Lady Bird Johnson; the Johnson's eldest daughter, Lynda Bird Johnson; President Johnson; the Johnson's younger daughter, Luci Baines Johnson, holding her newborn son, Patrick Lyndon; and Patrick Nugent, Luci's husband. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Henry Haller served as the White House Executive Chef from 1966-1987, during the presidencies of Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard M. Nixon, Gerald R. Ford, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan. Chef Henry Haller oversaw the food preparations for the wedding receptions of Luci Baines Johnson in 1966 and Lynda Bird Johnson in 1967.
  • President and Mrs. Johnson on the Truman Balcony
    Unknown
    Truman Balcony
    Washington Monument
    In this photograph, President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson share a tender moment on the second floor balcony of the South Portico. The balcony is commonly known as the "Truman Balcony," as it was added during the White House renovations overseen by President Harry S. Truman from 1948 to 1952. In this photograph, the Washington Monument appears prominently in the background. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987, catering to five first families and their distinguished guests.
  • Luci Baines Johnson's Wedding Reception
    Unknown
    wedding
    South Portico
    First Family
    This photograph was taken on August 6, 1966 during the wedding reception for Luci Baines Johnson and Patrick Nugent. The couple was married at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C. and enjoyed their reception at the White House. The newly married couple stands on the South Portico, flanked by their parents, including President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson. Luci's bridesmaids are pictured descending the eastern stairs of the South Portico, wearing matching pink dresses and veils. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987. Chef Haller oversaw the food preparations for Luci Baines Johnson's wedding reception.
  • President and Mrs. Johnson with Princess Margaret and the Earl of Snowdon
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    White House Guests
    Second Floor
    Queens' Bedroom
    event
    In this photograph, taken November 17, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson meet with Princess Margaret and her husband the Earl of Snowdon in the Queens' Bedroom. Princess Margaret was the sister of England's Queen Elizabeth II. In 1960, she married photographer Antony Armstrong-Jones, who was given the title Earl of Snowdon by the Queen. The Johnsons received the Earl and Countess of Snowdon in the Queens' suite, a Second Floor guest quarters often reserved for visiting royalty. Over the mantelpiece hangs a trumeau gifted to the White House by Margaret's sister during her visit as a princess in 1951.
  • President and Mrs. Johnson with Princess Margaret and the Earl of Snowdon
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    White House Guests
    Second Floor
    Queens' Bedroom
    event
    In this photograph, taken November 17, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson meet with Princess Margaret and her husband, the Earl of Snowdon, in the Queens' Bedroom. Princess Margaret was the sister of England's Queen Elizabeth II. In 1960, she married photographer Antony Armstrong-Jones, who was given the title Earl of Snowdon by the Queen. The Johnsons received the Earl and Countess of Snowdon in the Queens' suite, a Second Floor guest quarters often reserved for visiting royalty. Over the mantelpiece hangs a trumeau gifted to the White House by Margaret's sister during her visit as a princess in 1951.
  • President and Mrs. Johnson with Princess Margaret and the Earl of Snowdon
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    White House Guests
    Second Floor
    Queens' Bedroom
    event
    In this photograph, taken November 17, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson meet with Princess Margaret and her husband, the Earl of Snowdon, in the Queens' Bedroom. Princess Margaret was the sister of England's Queen Elizabeth II. In 1960, she married photographer Antony Armstrong-Jones, who was given the title Earl of Snowdon by the Queen. The Johnsons received the Earl and Countess of Snowdon in the Queens' suite, a Second Floor guest quarters often reserved for visiting royalty. Over the mantelpiece hangs a trumeau gifted to the White House by Margaret's sister during her visit as a princess in 1951.
  • President and Mrs. Johnson with Princess Margaret and the Earl of Snowdon
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    White House Guests
    Second Floor
    Queens' Bedroom
    event
    In this photograph, taken November 17, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson meet with Princess Margaret and her husband, the Earl of Snowdon, in the Queens' Bedroom. Princess Margaret was the sister of England's Queen Elizabeth II. In 1960, she married photographer Antony Armstrong-Jones, who was given the title Earl of Snowdon by the Queen. The Johnsons received the Earl and Countess of Snowdon in the Queens' suite, a Second Floor guest quarters often reserved for visiting royalty. Over the mantelpiece hangs a trumeau gifted to the White House by Margaret's sister during her visit as a princess in 1951.
  • President and Mrs. Johnson with Princess Margaret and the Earl of Snowdon
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    White House Guests
    Second Floor
    Queens' Bedroom
    event
    In this photograph, taken November 17, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson meet with Princess Margaret and her husband, the Earl of Snowdon, in the Queens' Bedroom. Princess Margaret was the sister of England's Queen Elizabeth II. In 1960, she married photographer Antony Armstrong-Jones, who was given the title Earl of Snowdon by the Queen. The Johnsons received the Earl and Countess of Snowdon in the Queens' suite, a Second Floor guest quarters often reserved for visiting royalty. Over the mantelpiece hangs a trumeau gifted to the White House by Margaret's sister during her visit as a princess in 1951.
  • President Johnson Welcomes Princess Margaret of England
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    White House Guests
    Second Floor
    Queens' Bedroom
    event
    In this photograph, taken November 17, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson meets with Princess Margaret in the Queens' Bedroom. Princess Margaret was the sister of England's Queen Elizabeth II. In 1960, she married photographer Antony Armstrong-Jones, who was given the title Earl of Snowdon by the Queen. President Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson received the Earl and Countess of Snowdon in the Queens' suite, a Second Floor guest quarters often reserved for visiting royalty. Over the mantelpiece hangs a trumeau gifted to the White House by Margaret's sister during her visit as a princess in 1951.
  • President and Mrs. Johnson with Princess Margaret and the Earl of Snowdon
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    White House Guests
    Second Floor
    Queens' Bedroom
    event
    In this photograph, taken November 17, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson meet with Princess Margaret and her husband, the Earl of Snowdon, in the Queens' Bedroom. Princess Margaret was the sister of England's Queen Elizabeth II. In 1960, she married photographer Antony Armstrong-Jones, who was given the title Earl of Snowdon by the Queen. The Johnsons received the Earl and Countess of Snowdon in the Queens' suite, a Second Floor guest quarters often reserved for visiting royalty. Over the mantelpiece hangs a trumeau gifted to the White House by Margaret's sister during her visit as a princess in 1951.
  • President Johnson Welcomes Princess Margaret of England
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    White House Guests
    Second Floor
    Queens' Bedroom
    event
    In this photograph, taken November 17, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson meets with Princess Margaret in the Queens' Bedroom. Princess Margaret was the sister of England's Queen Elizabeth II. In 1960, she married photographer Antony Armstrong-Jones, who was given the title Earl of Snowdon by the Queen. President Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson received the Earl and Countess of Snowdon in the Queens' suite, a Second Floor guest quarters often reserved for visiting royalty. Over the mantelpiece hangs a trumeau gifted to the White House by Margaret's sister during her visit as a princess in 1951.
  • President Johnson, Princess Margaret, and the Earl of Snowdon
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    White House Guests
    Second Floor
    Queens' Bedroom
    event
    In this photograph, taken November 17, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson, Princess Margaret, and her husband the Earl of Snowdon pass photographers as they exit the Queens' Bedroom. Princess Margaret was the sister of England's Queen Elizabeth II. In 1960, she married photographer Antony Armstrong-Jones, who was given the title Earl of Snowdon by the Queen. The Johnsons received the Earl and Countess of Snowdon in the Queens' suite, a Second Floor guest quarters often reserved for visiting royalty.
  • President and Mrs. Johnson Greet Princess Margaret of England
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    White House Guests
    Second Floor
    Queens' Bedroom
    event
    In this photograph, taken November 17, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson greet Princess Margaret in the Queens' Bedroom. Princess Margaret was the sister of England's Queen Elizabeth II. In 1960, she married photographer Antony Armstrong-Jones, who was given the title Earl of Snowdon by the Queen. The Johnsons received the Earl and Countess of Snowdon in the Queens' suite, a Second Floor guest quarters often reserved for visiting royalty.