• President Ford Discusses Aid to Cambodia with Senators and Advisors
    Bruce Dale
    staff of FLOTUS and POTUS
    staff
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    Congress
    In this photograph, taken March 6, 1975 by Bruce Dale, President Gerald R. Ford meets with a group of United States Senators and advisors to discuss aid to Cambodia. Present at the meeting were Senator Hubert H. Humphrey of Minnesota; Senator Clifford P. Case of New Jersey; Senator John Sparkman of Alabama; John Ortho Marsh, Jr., counselor to the president; Max Friedersdorf, White House assistant for Congressional Relations; Lt. Gen. Brent Snowcroft, deputy assistant to the president for National Security Affairs; and William T. Kendall, deputy assistant for Legislative Affairs. Earlier, Humphrey had served as Vice President of the United States under President Lyndon B. Johnson. In this photograph, chief official White House photographer David Hume Kennerly can be seen snapping photographs in the background.
  • President Ford Discusses Aid to Cambodia with Senators and Advisors
    Bruce Dale
    staff of FLOTUS and POTUS
    staff
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    Congress
    In this photograph, taken March 6, 1975 by Bruce Dale, President Gerald R. Ford meets with a group of United States Senators and advisors to discuss aid to Cambodia. Present at the meeting were Senator Hubert H. Humphrey of Minnesota; Senator Clifford P. Case of New Jersey; Senator John Sparkman of Alabama; John Ortho Marsh, Jr., counselor to the president; Max Friedersdorf, White House assistant for Congressional Relations; Lt. Gen. Brent Snowcroft, deputy assistant to the president for National Security Affairs; and William T. Kendall, deputy assistant for Legislative Affairs. Earlier, Humphrey had served as Vice President of the United States under President Lyndon B. Johnson. In this photograph, chief official White House photographer David Hume Kennerly snaps photographs from behind those seated for the meeting.
  • Inaugural Ball for the Second Inauguration of President Lyndon B. Johnson
    Yoichi R. Okamoto
    inaugurations
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph of an inaugural ball for President Lyndon B. Johnson was taken by Yoichi R. Okamoto on January 20, 1965. Following President Johnson's second inauguration, inaugural balls were held at the National Guard Armory and four Washington, D.C. hotels: the Mayflower, Sheraton-Park, Shoreham, and Statler-Hilton. Pictured here from left to right: Luci Baines Johnson (wearing a pink gown), First Lady Lady Bird Johnson, President Lyndon B. Johnson, Lynda Bird Johnson, Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, Muriel Humphrey.
  • Bill Signing Ceremony for Civil Rights Act of 1964
    O. J. Rapp
    signing
    press
    bills
    State Floor
    East Room
    civil rights
    In this photograph, taken by O. J. Rapp on July 2, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson delivers a televised address to the nation prior to signing into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The bill prohibited job discrimination on the basis of race, sex, color, religion, or national origin, ended segregation in public places, and the unequal application of voting requirements. In attendance at the ceremony were members of Congress and civil rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rep. Peter Rodino of New Jersey.
  • President Carter Takes the Oath of Office
    Bernard Godfryd
    inaugurations
    U.S. Capitol
    Justices
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph of Chief Justice Warren E. Burger of the Supreme Court administering the Oath of Office to Jimmy Carter on the east portico of United States Capitol was taken by Bernard Gotfryd on January 20, 1977. Next to them stands First Lady Rosalynn Carter. Among those in the crowd were outgoing President Gerald R. Ford, former Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, newly sworn-in Vice President Walter F. Mondale, and the Carters’ youngest child, daughter Amy.
  • President John F. Kennedy Signs Nuclear Test Ban Treaty
    Cecil Stoughton
    signing
    Treaty Room
    Second Floor
    treaties
    In this photograph, taken by Cecil Stoughton on October 7, 1963, President John F. Kennedy speaks during the signing ceremony for the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty in the Treaty Room of the White House. Ratified by the U.S. Senate on September 24, 1963, the treaty allowed underground nuclear tests, but prohibited tests in the water, atmosphere, or outer space. The signers pledged to end the arms race, move to complete disarmament, and protect the environment from nuclear contamination. The ceremony was held shortly after the Treaty Room was restored by First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy and interior designer Stéphane Boudin. The refurbished room paid homage to late 19th-century splendor and included deep green flocked wallpaper with a geometric border based on a design used for the State Rooms of the White House during the Andrew Jackson administration, a cabinet table, sofa, and chandeliers from the Ulysses S. Grant administration; and notable works of art such as Peter Frederick Rothermel's "The Republican Court in the Days of Lincoln," pictured here on the wall behind President Kennedy.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Kennedy Throws the First Pitch at a Senators Game
    Robert L. Knudsen
    sports
    Washington, D.C.
    Presidential Visit
    In this photograph, taken by Robert L. Knudsen on April 10, 1961, President John F. Kennedy throws the first pitch of the season at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C. This was the first game for an expansion team called the Washington Senators; the former baseball team named the Washington Senators had relocated to Minnesota, becoming the Minnesota Twins. The expansion team later moved to Texas and became the Texas Rangers. Those looking on in this photograph include Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson; Senator Hubert H. Humphrey of Minnesota; Special Assistant to the President David F. Powers; majority owner of the Washington Senators General Elwood R. Quesada; Senate Minority Leader Everett McKinley Dirksen of Illinois; Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare Abraham Ribicoff; Associate Press Secretary Andrew Hatcher; and Secret Service Agents Gerald "Jerry" Behn and John J. “Muggsy” O’Leary.
  • President Johnson at National Security Council Meeting
    James P. Blair
    Cabinet Room
    West Wing
    Cabinet
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson was taken by James P. Blair on May 10, 1966. In this photograph, President Johnson is seen meeting with members of his National Security Council in the Cabinet Room in the West Wing. Among the group gathered were Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, Secretary of the Treasury Henry H. Fowler, and Johnson's recently-appointed National Security Advisor, W. W. Rostow. Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., United States ambassador to South Vietnam, also attended the meeting while on leave.
  • President Johnson at National Security Council Meeting
    James P. Blair
    Cabinet Room
    West Wing
    Cabinet
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson was taken by James P. Blair on May 10, 1966. In this photograph, President Johnson is seen meeting with members of his National Security Council in the Cabinet Room in the West Wing. Among the group gathered were Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, Secretary of the Treasury Henry H. Fowler, and Johnson's recently-appointed National Security Advisor, W. W. Rostow. Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., United States ambassador to South Vietnam, also attended the meeting while on leave.
  • President Johnson at National Security Council Meeting
    James P. Blair
    Cabinet Room
    West Wing
    Cabinet
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson was taken by James P. Blair on May 10, 1966. In this photograph, President Johnson is seen meeting with members of his National Security Council in the Cabinet Room in the West Wing. Among the group gathered were Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, Secretary of the Treasury Henry H. Fowler, and Johnson's recently-appointed National Security Advisor, W. W. Rostow. Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., United States ambassador to South Vietnam, also attended the meeting while on leave.
  • President Johnson at National Security Council Meeting
    James P. Blair
    Cabinet Room
    West Wing
    Cabinet
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson was taken by James P. Blair on May 10, 1966. In this photograph, President Johnson is seen meeting with members of his National Security Council in the Cabinet Room in the West Wing. Among the group gathered were Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, Secretary of the Treasury Henry H. Fowler, and Johnson's recently-appointed National Security Advisor, W. W. Rostow. Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., United States ambassador to South Vietnam, also attended the meeting while on leave.
  • President Johnson at National Security Council Meeting
    James P. Blair
    Cabinet Room
    West Wing
    Cabinet
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson was taken by James P. Blair on May 10, 1966. In this photograph, President Johnson is seen meeting with members of his National Security Council in the Cabinet Room in the West Wing. Among the group gathered were Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, Secretary of the Treasury Henry H. Fowler, and Johnson's recently-appointed National Security Advisor, W. W. Rostow. Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., United States ambassador to South Vietnam, also attended the meeting while on leave.
  • President Johnson at National Security Council Meeting
    James P. Blair
    Cabinet Room
    West Wing
    Cabinet
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson was taken by James P. Blair on May 10, 1966. In this photograph, President Johnson is seen meeting with members of his National Security Council in the Cabinet Room in the West Wing. Among the group gathered were Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, Secretary of the Treasury Henry H. Fowler, and Johnson's recently-appointed National Security Advisor, W. W. Rostow. Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., United States ambassador to South Vietnam, also attended the meeting while on leave.
  • President Johnson at National Security Council Meeting
    James P. Blair
    Cabinet Room
    West Wing
    Cabinet
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson was taken by James P. Blair on May 10, 1966. In this photograph, President Johnson is seen meeting with members of his National Security Council in the Cabinet Room in the West Wing. Among the group gathered were Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, Secretary of the Treasury Henry H. Fowler, and Johnson's recently-appointed National Security Advisor, W. W. Rostow. Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., United States ambassador to South Vietnam, also attended the meeting while on leave.
  • President Johnson at National Security Council Meeting
    James P. Blair
    Cabinet Room
    West Wing
    Cabinet
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson was taken by James P. Blair on May 10, 1966. In this photograph, President Johnson is seen meeting with members of his National Security Council in the Cabinet Room in the West Wing. Among the group gathered were Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, Secretary of the Treasury Henry H. Fowler, and Johnson's recently-appointed National Security Advisor, W. W. Rostow. Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., United States ambassador to South Vietnam, also attended the meeting while on leave.
  • President Johnson at National Security Council Meeting
    James P. Blair
    Cabinet Room
    West Wing
    Cabinet
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson was taken by James P. Blair on May 10, 1966. In this photograph, President Johnson is seen meeting with members of his National Security Council in the Cabinet Room in the West Wing. Among the group gathered were Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, Secretary of the Treasury Henry H. Fowler, and Johnson's recently-appointed National Security Advisor, W. W. Rostow. Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., United States ambassador to South Vietnam, also attended the meeting while on leave.
  • President Ford Discusses Aid to Cambodia with Senators and Advisors
    Bruce Dale
    staff of FLOTUS and POTUS
    staff
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    Congress
    In this photograph, taken March 6, 1975 by Bruce Dale, President Gerald R. Ford meets with United States Senators and advisors to discuss aid to Cambodia. Senator Hubert H. Humphrey of Minnesota; Senator Clifford P. Case of New Jersey; Senator John Sparkman of Alabama; John Ortho Marsh, Jr., counselor to the president; Max Friedersdorf, White House assistant for Congressional Relations; Lt. Gen. Brent Snowcroft, deputy assistant to the president for National Security Affairs; and William T. Kendall, deputy assistant for Legislative Affairs. Earlier, Humphrey had served as Vice President of the United States under President Lyndon B. Johnson.
  • Signing of the Voting Rights Act
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Johnson at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson seated beside his daughter Luci during the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965, in the Capitol Rotunda. Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey sits on the other side of Luci. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Johnson at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson seated beside his daughter Luci during the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965, in the Capitol Rotunda. Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey sits on the other side of Luci. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.