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  • Nixon Family Portrait
    Karl Schumacher
    portrait
    First Family
    Second Floor
    Yellow Oval Room
    This portrait of President Richard M. Nixon with his family in the Yellow Oval Room was taken on Father's Day, June 15, 1969. Pictured from left: the president's son-in-law, David Eisenhower; the president's youngest daughter, Julie Nixon Eisenhower; President Nixon; First Lady Pat Nixon; and Tricia Nixon, the president's eldest daughter. This photograph is part of the collection of former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. As executive chef from 1966-1987, Haller catered to the taste of five first families and their distinguished guests.
  • President and Mrs. Nixon
    Unknown
    portrait
    This is a photographic portrait of President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon. Nixon served as the 37th president of the United States from 1969-1974. Achievements during the Nixon administration include the moon landing, improved relations with China and the Soviet Union, and the conclusion of American fighting in Vietnam. Nixon also became the first president to resign, following the Watergate scandal. As first lady, Pat Nixon improved public accessibility to the White House by offering special tours for visually impaired groups and installing wheelchair ramps at public entrances. Mrs. Nixon also added over 600 pieces to the White House Collection, and oversaw the refurbishment of nine rooms in the White House. This photograph is part of a personal collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. As executive chef from 1966-1987, Haller catered to the taste of five first families and their distinguished guests.
  • Pat Nixon
    Karl Schumacher
    portrait
    This photographic portrait of First Lady Pat Nixon was taken on May 15, 1971. Pat Nixon was first lady of the United States from 1969 to 1974. As first lady, she oversaw programs to increase public accessibility to the White House, promoted art by adding 600 pieces to the White House Collection, and advocated for volunteer organizations such as the Girl Scouts. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987, catering to the taste of five presidential families and their distinguished guests. The Nixon family enjoyed refreshing salads and light luncheon plates, especially on days when there was a formal evening event, such as a State Dinner.
  • President Gerald R. Ford
    David Hume Kennerly
    portrait
    Oval Office
    West Wing
    This second official photographic portrait of President Gerald R. Ford was taken in the Oval Office on February 26, 1976 by chief White House photographer David Hume Kennerly. Following the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon, Ford served as president of the United States from August 9, 1974 to January 20, 1977. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Henry Haller served as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987.
  • President Gerald R. Ford and First Lady Betty Ford
    David Hume Kennerly
    portrait
    This photographic portrait shows President Gerald R. Ford alongside his wife, First Lady Betty Ford. President Ford had been appointed vice president to Richard M. Nixon under the conditions of the 25th Amendment, replacing Vice President Spiro T. Agnew upon his resignation. Ford assumed the presidency upon the resignation of President Nixon on August 8, 1974. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987. From the White House Kitchen, the Fords preferred classic American fare, including a Sunday ritual of brunch featuring waffles and strawberries, and oven roast.
  • First Lady Betty Ford
    David Hume Kennerly
    portrait
    Treaty Room
    Second Floor
    This photographic portrait of First Lady Betty Ford was taken around December 24, 1975 in the Treaty Room by chief White House photographer David Hume Kennerly. Betty Ford earned admiration from openly discussing her treatment for breast cancer, at the time a stigmatized disease, in September 1974. While a devoted housewife, Ford did not shy away from voicing her support of the Equal Rights Amendment, and, later, sharing her own struggles with drugs and alcohol to encourage others to seek treatment. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Tricia Nixon
    Robert L. Knudsen
    portrait
    East Colonnade
    East Wing
    First Family
    This photographic portrait of Tricia Nixon was taken around March 24, 1969. The eldest daughter of President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon, Tricia's wedding in the White House Rose Garden to Edward Cox on June 12, 1971 captivated the American public. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Nixon Family Portrait
    Karl Schumacher
    portrait
    First Family
    Yellow Oval Room
    Second Floor
    This portrait of President M. Nixon and his family was taken on June 15, 1969 in the Yellow Oval Room. Pictured from left: David Eisenhower, grandson of President Dwight D. Eisenhower and First Lady Mamie Doud Eisenhower; his wife Julie Nixon Eisenhower, youngest daughter of President Nixon; President Nixon; First Lady Pat Nixon; and their eldest daughter Tricia Nixon. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as the executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987.
  • President Reagan and Nancy Reagan
    Unknown
    portrait
    Blue Room
    State Floor
    This portrait shows President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan posing in front of a south-facing window in the Blue Room on the State Floor of the White House. The Washington Monument can be seen out the window behind the first couple. The bottom of the photograph contains the message "To Elanor and Ernst Naef With best wishes." However, the photograph does not include a signature, and the names of the addressees have been crossed out. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987.
  • President Gerald Ford and First Lady Betty Ford
    Bill Fitz-Patrick
    portrait
    This photographic portrait by Bill Fitz-Patrick shows President Gerald R. Ford alongside his wife, Betty, on the South Grounds. Ford was appointed vice president to Richard M. Nixon under the conditions of the 25th Amendment, replacing Spiro T. Agnew upon his resignation. Ford assumed the presidency after President Nixon's resignation on August 8, 1974. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served five first families and their distinguished guests as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987. From the White House Kitchen, the Fords preferred classic American fare, including oven roast and a Sunday ritual of brunch featuring waffles and strawberries.
  • Ford Family Portrait
    David Hume Kennerly
    East Sitting Hall
    Second Floor
    First Family
    pets
    portrait
    This photographic portrait of President Gerald R. Ford and his family was taken in the East Sitting Hall. The children of President Ford and First Lady Betty Ford stand behind their parents. From left: Susan Ford, Steve Ford, Jack Ford, Mike Ford, and Mike's wife, Gayle Ann Ford. President and Mrs. Ford's loyal Golden Retriever, Liberty, sits in front of the group. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Henry Haller served five first families and their distinguished guests as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Study for the Portrait of President Millard Fillmore
    G. P. A. Healy
    portrait
    This charcoal and chalk on paper study of President Millard Fillmore's was created by George Peter Alexander Healy, sometimes known as G. P. A. Healy, on December 12, 1857. Healy used this study for the official portrait of President Fillmore in the White House Collection. Healy was one of the most popular and prolific portraitists of the mid-19th century. Fillmore had served in the House of Representatives and was vice president when President Zachary Taylor died suddenly while in office in 1850. Fillmore served as president from July 9, 1850 until March 4, 1853.
  • Benjamin Henry Boneval Latrobe
    Charles Willson Peale
    portrait
    This portrait by Charles Willson Peale is of architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe. President Thomas Jefferson appointed Latrobe Surveyor of Public Buildings in 1803. Latrobe is best known as the architect who designed the U.S. Capitol, St. John's Church and Decatur House in Lafayette Square, the White House East and West Terraces, and the Madison state rooms. He was also the chief engineer for the U.S. Navy. Peale was a soldier and inventor as well as an artist and created many portraits of Revolutionary War era figures. His younger brother, James, and his son Rubens, each have pieces in the White House Collection. Joseph H. Bailey photographed the portrait for the White House Historical Association's records and publications in January 1975.
  • Benjamin Henry Boneval Latrobe
    Charles Willson Peale
    portrait
    This portrait by Charles Willson Peale is of architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe. President Thomas Jefferson appointed Latrobe Surveyor of Public Buildings in 1803. Latrobe is best known as the architect who designed the U.S. Capitol, St. John's Church and Decatur House in Lafayette Square, the White House East and West Terraces, and the Madison state rooms. He was also the chief engineer for the U.S. Navy. Peale was a soldier and inventor as well as an artist and created many portraits of Revolutionary War era figures. His younger brother, James, and his son Rubens, each have pieces in the White House Collection. Joseph H. Bailey photographed the portrait for the White House Historical Association's records and publications in January 1975.
  • Benjamin Henry Boneval Latrobe
    Charles Willson Peale
    portrait
    This portrait by Charles Willson Peale is of architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe. President Thomas Jefferson appointed Latrobe Surveyor of Public Buildings in 1803. Latrobe is best known as the architect who designed the U.S. Capitol, St. John's Church and Decatur House in Lafayette Square, the White House East and West Terraces, and the Madison state rooms. He was also the chief engineer for the U.S. Navy. Peale was a soldier and inventor as well as an artist and created many portraits of Revolutionary War era figures. His younger brother, James, and his son Rubens, each have pieces in the White House Collection. Joseph H. Bailey photographed the portrait for the White House Historical Association's records and publications in January 1975.
  • Benjamin Henry Boneval Latrobe
    Charles Willson Peale
    portrait
    This portrait by Charles Willson Peale is of architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe. President Thomas Jefferson appointed Latrobe Surveyor of Public Buildings in 1803. Latrobe is best known as the architect who designed the U.S. Capitol, St. John's Church and Decatur House in Lafayette Square, the White House East and West Terraces, and the Madison state rooms. He was also the chief engineer for the U.S. Navy. Peale was a soldier and inventor as well as an artist and created many portraits of Revolutionary War era figures. His younger brother, James, and his son Rubens, each have pieces in the White House Collection. Joseph H. Bailey photographed the portrait for the White House Historical Association's records and publications in January 1975.
  • Benjamin Henry Boneval Latrobe
    Charles Willson Peale
    portrait
    This portrait by Charles Willson Peale is of architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe. President Thomas Jefferson appointed Latrobe Surveyor of Public Buildings in 1803. Latrobe is best known as the architect who designed the U.S. Capitol, St. John's Church and Decatur House in Lafayette Square, the White House East and West Terraces, and the Madison state rooms. He was also the chief engineer for the U.S. Navy. Peale was a soldier and inventor as well as an artist and created many portraits of Revolutionary War era figures. His younger brother, James, and his son Rubens, each have pieces in the White House Collection. Joseph H. Bailey photographed the portrait for the White House Historical Association's records and publications in January 1975.
  • Theodore Roosevelt
    Tadé Styka
    portrait
    This painting of Theodore Roosevelt was painted by Polish artist Tadé Styka circa 1909. Styka depicts Roosevelt during his time with the Rough Riders, a volunteer cavalry unit that Roosevelt led during the Spanish-American War. The painting later hung in the Roosevelt Room of the White House. A former governor of New York, Roosevelt became president upon the assassination of William McKinley, on September 14, 1901 and served until March 4, 1909. This painting was acquired for the White House Collection by the White House Historical Association in 1974.
  • Theodore Roosevelt
    Tadé Styka
    portrait
    This painting of Theodore Roosevelt was painted by Polish artist Tadé Styka circa 1909. Styka depicts Roosevelt during his time with the Rough Riders, a volunteer cavalry unit that Roosevelt led during the Spanish-American War. The painting later hung in the Roosevelt Room of the White House. A former governor of New York, Roosevelt became president upon the assassination of William McKinley, on September 14, 1901 and served until March 4, 1909. This painting was acquired for the White House Collection by the White House Historical Association in 1974.
  • Andrew Jackson
    Samuel M. Charles
    portrait
    This watercolor on ivory portrait of President Andrew Jackson was completed by Samuel M. Charles in 1835. The portrait is signed and dated to the right, reading, "Painted by S M. Charles 1835." Jackson was president from March 4, 1829 until March 4, 1837. Prior to his election, President Jackson served in the United States House of Representatives and United States Senate for the state of Tennessee and was a major general during the War of 1812. Bates Littlehales photographed this portrait in March 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Andrew Jackson
    Samuel M. Charles
    portrait
    This watercolor on ivory portrait of President Andrew Jackson was completed by Samuel M. Charles in 1835. The portrait is signed and dated to the right, reading, "Painted by S M. Charles 1835." Jackson was president from March 4, 1829 until March 4, 1837. Prior to his election, President Jackson served in the United States House of Representatives and United States Senate for the state of Tennessee and was a major general during the War of 1812. Bates Littlehales photographed this portrait in March 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Andrew Jackson
    Samuel M. Charles
    portrait
    This watercolor on ivory portrait of President Andrew Jackson was completed by Samuel M. Charles in 1835. The portrait is signed and dated to the right, reading, "Painted by S M. Charles 1835." Jackson was president from March 4, 1829 until March 4, 1837. Prior to his election, President Jackson served in the United States House of Representatives and United States Senate for the state of Tennessee and was a major general during the War of 1812. Bates Littlehales photographed this portrait in March 1962 during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively, and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the portrait in August 1965 at the time of its acquisition into the White House Collection.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively, and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the portrait in August 1965 at the time of its acquisition into the White House Collection.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
    Douglas Chandor
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was painted by Douglas Chandor. Her husband, Franklin Roosevelt, was president from March 4, 1933 until his death on April 12, 1945, a span of time that included the Great Depression and the entirety of World War II. Mrs. Roosevelt advocated for many causes during her years in the White House, holding press conferences, traveling extensively, and writing a syndicated newspaper column. Following her time as first lady, Mrs. Roosevelt was appointed a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and was the first chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. There, she co-drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1949, Mrs. Roosevelt first sat for her portrait in Chandor's New York studio. The White House Historical Association purchased the portrait for the White House Collection. On February 4, 1966, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson invited more than 250 guests to the White House for the presentation of Eleanor Roosevelt's official portrait. Joseph J. Scherschel photographed the portrait in August 1965 at the time of its acquisition into the White House Collection.