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  • Inaugural Ball for the Second Inauguration of President Lyndon B. Johnson
    Yoichi R. Okamoto
    inaugurations
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph of an inaugural ball for President Lyndon B. Johnson was taken by Yoichi R. Okamoto on January 20, 1965. Following President Johnson's second inauguration, inaugural balls were held at the National Guard Armory and four Washington, D.C. hotels: the Mayflower, Sheraton-Park, Shoreham, and Statler-Hilton. Pictured here from left to right: Luci Baines Johnson (wearing a pink gown), First Lady Lady Bird Johnson, President Lyndon B. Johnson, Lynda Bird Johnson, Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, Muriel Humphrey.
  • Presidential Turkeys at the Willard Hotel
    Andrea Hanks
    Washington, D.C.
    Thanksgiving
    Turkey Pardon
    This photograph, taken by Andrea Hanks on November 24, 2019, shows a turkey enjoying its stay in a guest room at the Willard Hotel in Washington, D.C. Turkeys Bread and Butter arrived at the luxury hotel in advance of the Turkey Pardon ceremony at the White House two days later. Butter was selected to receive a pardon from President Donald Trump in the Rose Garden ceremony following a national contest. After the ceremony, the pair of turkeys were transferred to 'Gobblers Rest' reserve in Blacksburg, Virginia to be cared for by veterinarians and students of Virginia Tech's Animal and Poultry Sciences Department. Presidents and their families have received turkeys for the holidays as far back as the 1870s. However, the origin of the turkey pardon is said to have started with President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, after he offered clemency to a turkey purchased for Christmas dinner at his son's request. The pardoning of a Thanksgiving turkey became a formalized tradition during the Ronald Reagan administration.
  • United States Indian Band Performs for Vice President Curtis
    National Photo Company
    music
    U.S. Capitol
    American Indians
    Washington, D.C.
    In this photograph, taken on April 26, 1929, musicians from the United States Indian Band perform for Vice President Charles Curtis on the steps of the United States Capitol Building. The band, which included representatives from 13 tribal nations, visited the Capitol to pay their respects to Curtis and Senator William Bliss Pine of Oklahoma. Born in Kansas to a white father and Native American mother, and raised by his maternal grandparents, Curtis was the first person of Native American descent as well as the first person of color to serve as vice president. He served as vice president to President Herbert Hoover.
  • United States Indian Band Performs for Vice President Curtis
    National Photo Company
    music
    U.S. Capitol
    American Indians
    Washington, D.C.
    In this photograph, taken on April 26, 1929, musicians from the United States Indian Band perform for Vice President Charles Curtis on the steps of the United States Capitol Building. The band, which included representatives from 13 tribal nations, visited the Capitol to pay their respects to Curtis and Oklahoma Senator William Bliss Pine. Born in Kansas to a white father and Native American mother, and raised by his maternal grandparents, Curtis was the first person of Native American descent as well as the first person of color to serve as vice president. He served as vice president for President Herbert Hoover.
  • Vice President Curtis Throws Opening Pitch at Congressional Baseball Game
    Harris & Ewing
    sports
    Washington, D.C.
    Congress
    In this photograph, taken on June 4, 1932, Vice President Charles Curtis throws the opening pitch at the Congressional Baseball Game at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C. The friendly competition between Republican and Democrat members of Congress was first held in 1909, and soon became an anticipated tradition. The first Congressional Baseball Game since the start of the Great Depression, the 1932 game was held as a fundraiser to benefit unemployed people in the District of Columbia. The Republicans defeated the Democrats with a final score of 19-5.
  • Vice President Curtis at Work in his Office on a Hot Day
    National Photo Company
    U.S. Capitol
    Washington, D.C.
    In this photograph, taken on July 11, 1929, Vice President Charles Curtis mops sweat off his brow as he sits beside an electric fan at his desk on a hot day at his office in the United States Capitol Building. That week, temperatures in the nation's capital were unseasonably warm, with highs exceeding 90 degrees Fahrenheit. Hot and humid summers have long been a part of life in Washington, D.C., with many presidents electing to travel to retreats such as Camp David during the summer months to escape the oppressive heat.
  • President and Mrs. Bush Participate in Memorial Service for September 11th Victims
    Eric Draper
    memorials
    commemorations
    Washington, D.C.
    St. John's Church
    Semptember 11
    In this photograph, taken by Eric Draper on September 11, 2002, President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Welch Bush light a candle at St. John's Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C., during a private service of prayer and remembrance honoring the victims of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. This first anniversary of the attacks was also the first observation of Patriot Day, a day designated by President Bush for national participation in remembrance ceremonies. On September 11, 2002, President Bush also participated in a moment of silence at the White House and visited the location of the terrorist attacks in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, the former site of the World Trade Center in New York city, and the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia.
  • Housewarming Party at the U.S. Naval Observatory
    Ricardo Thomas
    furniture
    beds
    Washington, D.C.
    U.S. Naval Observatory
    parties
    This photograph was taken by Ricardo Thomas on September 7, 1975, during the housewarming party for the vice president's residence at the United States Naval Observatory. Here, Vice President Nelson A. Rockefeller invites President Gerald R. Ford, First Lady Betty Ford, and their daughter Susan Ford to tour the master bedroom of the vice president's residence. The bed features a distinctive wood and brass headboard and footboard designed by German surrealist artist Max Ernst. Though Rockefeller did not live at the house and only used it for entertaining, he donated the elaborate $35,000 bedframe to the master bedroom to support artistic innovation. The first vice president to live in the Naval Observatory was Walter F. Mondale, who moved into the house with his family in 1977.
  • Housewarming Party at the U.S. Naval Observatory
    Ricardo Thomas
    Washington, D.C.
    U.S. Naval Observatory
    parties
    This photograph was taken by Ricardo Thomas on September 7, 1975, during the housewarming party for the vice president's residence at the United States Naval Observatory. Here, Vice President Nelson A. Rockefeller and Second Lady Happy Rockefeller invite President Gerald R. Ford, First Lady Betty Ford, and their daughter Susan Ford to tour the dining room of the vice president's residence. Located at Number One Observatory Circle in Northwest Washington, D.C., the house was originally built for the superintendent of the United State Naval Observatory in 1893, but became the residence of the chief of naval operations in 1923. In 1974, the house was selected by Congress to be refurbished for use as the residence of the Vice President of the United States. Although Vice President and Mrs. Rockefeller hosted housewarming parties after renovations of the house were complete in 1975, the Rockefellers did not live in the house and only used it for entertaining. The first vice president to live in the Naval Observatory was Walter F. Mondale, who moved into the house with his family in 1977.
  • Executive Office Staff at Work on September 11, 2001
    Unknown
    staff of FLOTUS and POTUS
    staff
    September 11
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph was taken after executive office staff evacuated the White House following the terrorist attacks on the morning of September 11, 2001. Anita McBride, assistant to President George W. Bush, led a group of senior staff to continue operations from the DaimlerChrysler office building, where her husband Tim McBride, former aide to President George H. W. Bush, worked as director of government affairs. This photograph shows Ken Mehlman, deputy assistant to the president for political affairs (left), and Brad Blakeman, deputy assistant to the president for appointments and scheduling (third from left), at work at their temporary "command post" in the DaimlerChrysler offices with Israel Hernandez, deputy assistant to the president (second from left), and Joel D. Kaplan, special assistant to the president in the office of the chief of staff (right).
  • Executive Office Staff at Work on September 11, 2001
    Unknown
    staff of FLOTUS and POTUS
    staff
    September 11
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph was taken after executive office staff evacuated the White House following the terrorist attacks on the morning of September 11, 2001. Anita McBride, assistant to President George W. Bush (pictured here at right), led a group of senior staff to continue operations from the DaimlerChrysler office building, where her husband Tim McBride, former aide to President George H. W. Bush, worked as director of government affairs. Also pictured in this photograph: Helen Mobley, director of presidential scheduling for correspondence and invitations (seated at left of Mrs. McBride), Josh Deckard, intern for the office of the White House chief of staff (standing behind at left), and Ashley Davis, deputy director of management and administration (standing behind at right).
  • Executive Office Staff at Work on September 11, 2001
    Unknown
    staff of FLOTUS and POTUS
    staff
    September 11
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph was taken after executive office staff evacuated the White House following the terrorist attacks on the morning of September 11, 2001. Anita McBride, assistant to President George W. Bush, led a group of senior staff to continue operations from the DaimlerChrysler office building, where her husband Tim McBride, former aide to President George H. W. Bush, worked as director of government affairs. Here, Scott Stanzel, spokesperson for the White House Office of Media Affairs (far right), meets with communication staff in a DaimlerChrysler conference room. Pictured listening to Stanzel from left to right: Ken Lisaius, Wendy Nipper, and Jimmy Orr.
  • Anita McBride and Mary Matalin following Evacuation of Executive Office Staff
    Unknown
    staff
    staff of FLOTUS and POTUS
    Washington, D.C.
    September 11
    This photograph was taken from the corner of 17th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue near Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C. during the evacuation of executive office staff following the terrorist attacks on the morning of September 11, 2001. The evacuation notice applied to approximately 1,800 staff members who worked in the East and West Wings of the White House, the Old Executive Office Building (later rededicated as the Eisenhower Executive Office Building), the New Executive Office Building, and the Winder Building. Here, Anita McBride, assistant to President George W. Bush (center) confers with Mary Matalin, counselor to Vice President Richard B. Cheney. Shortly after this photograph was taken, Matalin joined Vice President Cheney in the Presidential Emergency Operations Center (PEOC) beneath the White House, and McBride and other senior White House transitioned into the DaimlerChrysler office building to continue their work for the day.
  • Mrs. Bush Responds to September 11 Terrorist Attacks
    Unknown
    Washington, D.C.
    U.S. Capitol
    September 11
    First Family
    Congress
    First Lady Visit
    In this photograph, First Lady Laura Welch Bush speaks at the United States Capitol Building following the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York, New York on the morning of September 11, 2001. Mrs. Bush had planned on visiting the Capitol that day to brief the United States Senate Committee on Education on the White House Summit on Early Childhood Cognitive Development she had hosted that July. Here, Mrs. Bush is pictured standing between senators Judd Gregg of New Hampshire and Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts.
  • Evacuation of Executive Office Staff, September 11, 2001
    Unknown
    staff
    Washington, D.C.
    September 11
    Lafayette Park
    staff of FLOTUS and POTUS
    This photograph was taken near Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C. during the evacuation of executive office staff following the terrorist attacks on the morning of September 11, 2001. The evacuation notice applied to approximately 1,800 staff members who worked in the East and West Wings of the White House, the Old Executive Office Building (later rededicated the Eisenhower Executive Office Building), the New Executive Office Building, and the Winder Building.
  • Executive Office Staff at Work on September 11, 2001
    Unknown
    staff
    staff of FLOTUS and POTUS
    Washington, D.C.
    September 11
    This photograph was taken after executive office staff evacuated the White House following the terrorist attacks on the morning of September 11, 2001. Anita McBride, assistant to President George W. Bush, led a group of senior staff to continue operations from the DaimlerChrysler office building, where her husband Tim McBride, former aide to President George H. W. Bush, worked as director of government affairs. This photograph shows a group of White House staffers working from meeting rooms relinquished by DaimlerChrysler employees for their use.
  • Evacuation of the White House, September 11, 2001
    Unknown
    September 11
    Washington, D.C.
    press
    staff
    This photograph was taken from the corner of H Street and Jackson Place near Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C. during the evacuation of executive office staff following the terrorist attacks on the morning of September 11, 2001. The evacuation notice applied to approximately 1,800 staff members who worked in the East and West Wings of the White House, the Old Executive Office Building (later rededicated as the Eisenhower Executive Office Building), the New Executive Office Building, and the Winder Building. Other evacuees including members of the press can be seen among the crowd, including CNN correspondent John King.
  • Mrs. Bush Responds to September 11 Terrorist Attacks
    Unknown
    staff of FLOTUS and POTUS
    Washington, D.C.
    U.S. Capitol
    September 11
    staff
    In this photograph, taken on September 11, 2001, First Lady Laura Welch Bush watches media coverage of the morning's terrorist attacks from the office of Senator Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts at the United States Capitol Building. Mrs. Bush had planned on visiting the Capitol that day to brief the United States Senate Committee on Education on the White House Summit on Early Childhood Cognitive Development she had hosted that July. Here, the the first lady is pictured at right with her chief of staff Andrea "Andi" Ball (center), and an unidentified staff member.
  • Evacuation of White House Residence Staff on September 11, 2001
    Unknown
    staff
    Residence staff
    Washington, D.C.
    September 11
    In this photograph, White House Executive Pastry Chef Roland Mesnier (fourth from left, wearing chef's hat) reunites with members of the White House pastry team at the corner of H Street and Connecticut Avenue near Lafayette Square following the evacuation of the White House on September 11, 2001. Although White House Chief User Gary Walters issued the evacuation notice to White House Residence staff following the terrorist attacks that morning, communication regarding the evacuation was difficult due to a lack of government-issued communication devices carried by White House staff. Unable to reach his colleagues working in the White House Pastry Shop, Chef Mesnier relied on his large chef's torque for his staff to identify him among the crowd of evacuees outside the White House.
  • Executive Office Staff at Work on September 11, 2001
    Unknown
    staff of FLOTUS and POTUS
    staff
    September 11
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph was taken after executive office staff evacuated the White House following the terrorist attacks on the morning of September 11, 2001. Anita McBride, assistant to President George W. Bush, led a group of senior staff to continue operations from the DaimlerChrysler office building, where her husband Tim McBride, former aide to President George H. W. Bush, worked as director of government affairs. Here, White House spokespeople gather for a meeting in the DaimlerChrysler offices. Pictured standing from left to right: Taylor Griffin, Ken Lisaius, Jeanie Mamo, Wendy Nipper, and Jimmy Orr.
  • John McConnell Works on President Bush's Address to the Nation on September 11
    Unknown
    staff of FLOTUS and POTUS
    staff
    September 11
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph was taken after executive office staff evacuated the White House following the terrorist attacks on the morning of September 11, 2001. Anita McBride, assistant to President George W. Bush, led a group of senior staff to continue operations from the DaimlerChrysler office building, where her husband Tim McBride, former aide to President George H. W. Bush, worked as director of government affairs. Here, speechwriter John McConnell works on President George W. Bush's evening address to the nation from the Oval Office. McConnell collaborated on the speech with speechwriters David Frum, Matthew Scully, and Michael J. Gerson.
  • Evacuation of Executive Office Staff, September 11, 2001
    Unknown
    staff
    Washington, D.C.
    September 11
    Eisenhower Executive Office Building
    This photograph was taken during the evacuation of executive office staff following the terrorist attacks on the morning of September 11, 2001. The evacuation notice applied to approximately 1,800 staff members who worked in the East and West Wings of the White House, the Old Executive Office Building (later rededicated as the Eisenhower Executive Office Building), the New Executive Office Building, and the Winder Building. Here, fleeing staffers can be seen among the traffic and tourists outside the Old Executive Office Building at the corner of Pennsylvania Avenue and 17th Street.
  • Executive Office Staff at Work on September 11, 2001
    Unknown
    staff of FLOTUS and POTUS
    staff
    September 11
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph was taken after executive office staff evacuated the White House following the terrorist attacks on the morning of September 11, 2001. Anita McBride, assistant to President George W. Bush, led a group of senior staff to continue operations from the DaimlerChrysler office building, where her husband Tim McBride, former aide to President George H. W. Bush, worked as director of government affairs. This photograph shows a group of White House staffers working from offices relinquished by DaimlerChrysler employees for their use. Logan Walters, aide to President George W. Bush, gestures towards a document on a desk where deputy assistant Israel Hernandez and personal secretary Ashley Estes are seated. In the background, special assistant Kristen Silverberg convenes with associate council Courtney Elwood.
  • Officer C.J. Djossou Directs Pedestrians on September 11, 2001
    Unknown
    Washington, D.C.
    Decatur House
    September 11
    In this photograph, taken near Lafayette Square at corner of Jackson Place and H Street, officer C. J. Djossou directs pedestrians away from the White House following the terrorist attacks on the morning of September 11, 2001. Decatur House, the historic home of Commodore Stephen Decatur and headquarters of the White House Historical Association, is visible in the background. On September 11, 2001, the streets of Washington, D.C. were crowded with employees ordered to evacuate due to the threat of the terrorist attacks. Among those ordered to evacuate were approximately 1,800 executive office staff who worked in the East and West Wings of the White House, the Old Executive Office Building (later rededicated as the Eisenhower Executive Office Building), the New Executive Office Building, and the Winder Building.
  • Evacuation of White House Residence Staff on September 11, 2001
    Unknown
    staff
    Residence staff
    Washington, D.C.
    September 11
    In this photograph, White House Executive Chef Walter Scheib gathers with members of the White House Kitchen staff including Staff Kitchen chef Rachel Walker and contractor Marybeth Williams at the corner of H Street and Connecticut Avenue near Lafayette Square following the evacuation of the White House on September 11, 2001. Although White House Chief User Gary Walters issued the evacuation notice to White House Residence staff following the terrorist attacks that morning, communication regarding the evacuation was difficult due to a lack of government-issued communication devices carried by White House staff. Staff working in the White House Staff Kitchen were informed of the evacuation notice when assistant chef Cristeta Comerford telephoned from the Northwest Gate, and when Chef Scheib traveled to the underground kitchen in search of his remaining staff.