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  • American Indian Delegation on the South Grounds
    Mathew Brady
    delegation
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    This photograph shows a group of American Indian delegates, lawmakers, and interpreters gathered on the South Grounds of the White House. During the 19th and 20th centuries, many American Indian delegations traveled to the White House to express the concerns and challenges of their people. However, their requests were frequently dismissed, as they faced pressures to concede their lands and assimilate into American society. The photograph is credited to the studio of Mathew Brady and was likely taken during the James Buchanan or Abraham Lincoln administrations.
  • President Coolidge with Chiefs of the Sioux Nation
    National Photo Company
    delegation
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    Rose Garden
    This photograph, taken on March 10, 1925, shows President Calvin Coolidge with members of the Sioux Indian Republican Club of the Rosebud Reservation. The Rosebud Indian Reservation is located along South Dakota's southern border and is adjacent to the Pine Ridge Reservation. This photograph was taken on the South Grounds, near the West Garden, which was reimagined as the Rose Garden during the John F. Kennedy administration. During his presidency, Coolidge increased public perception of the challenges faced by American Indian communities, while promoting assimilation into American society.
  • President Coolidge Greets American Indians from the Osage Nation
    Library of Congress
    delegation
    American Indians
    South Grounds
    South Lawn
    This photograph shows President Calvin Coolidge posing with representatives from the Osage nation on the South Grounds of the White House. Charles H. Burke, commissioner on Indian Affairs, stands at right of Coolidge. Also among those photographed are Chief Bacon Rind (second to left), and Chief Paul Red Eagle (immediate right of Burke). During his presidency, Coolidge increased public perception of the challenges faced by American Indian communities, while promoting assimilation into American society.
  • President Coolidge Meets with Committee of One Hundred
    National Photo Company
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    delegation
    South Lawn
    In this photograph, President Calvin Coolidge meets with the Committee of One Hundred on the South Grounds of the White House. The Committee of One Hundred consisted of scholars, activists, and policy specialists who advised the federal government on critical issues facing the Native American population. During the meeting, Ruth Muskrat, a Mount Holyoke college student of Irish and Cherokee descent, presented Coolidge with a copy of "The Red Man in the United States," a book describing the adverse economic, educational, religious, and cultural challenges facing Native Americans.
  • President Coolidge Meets with Committee of One Hundred
    National Photo Company
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    delegation
    South Lawn
    In this photograph, President Calvin Coolidge meets with the Committee of One Hundred on the South Grounds of the White House. The Committee of One Hundred consisted of scholars, activists, and policy specialists who advised the federal government on critical issues facing the Native American population. Here, Ruth Muskrat, a Mount Holyoke college student of Irish and Cherokee descent, presents President Coolidge with a copy of "The Red Man in the United States," a book describing the adverse economic, educational, religious, and cultural challenges facing Native Americans.
  • President Franklin D. Roosevelt Greets Native Americans
    Harris & Ewing
    transportation
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    In this photograph, taken in May 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt receives a group of American Indians from the Pueblo nation on the South Drive. The president is pictured seated in an open convertible. The guests visited the White House to express support for legislation sponsored by U.S. Commissioner for the Bureau of Indian Affairs John Collier, which protected Pueblo land from encroaching agricultural interests.
  • President Harding Receives Sioux and Crow Chiefs
    Harris & Ewing
    South Grounds
    South Lawn
    American Indians
    Veterans Day
    In this photograph, President Warren G. Harding meets with leaders from the Crow and Sioux nations on the South Grounds on the White House. The group stands in front of the West Garden, which was reimagined as a green theater for official ceremonies and rededicated as the Rose Garden during the John F. Kennedy administration. Here, President Harding and Commissioner of Indian Affairs Charles H. Burke meet with chiefs including Plenty Coups (Alaxchíia Ahú) from the Crow nation, and chiefs Frost, Owl, and Red Horse. The chiefs met with Harding at the White House to present him with a tobacco pouch after representing their people at the burial of the Unknown Soldier, held at Arlington National Ceremony on November 11, 1921. Also in attendance at the burial were presidents Woodrow Wilson and William H. Taft and Vice President Calvin Coolidge. Since 1921, presidents have paid their respects at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, often in observance of military commemorations including Veterans Day and Memorial Day.
  • President Harding Receives Sioux and Crow Chiefs
    National Photo Company
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    Rose Garden
    Veterans Day
    In this photograph, President Warren G. Harding meets with leaders from the Crow and Sioux nations on the South Grounds on the White House. The group stands in front of the West Garden, which was reimagined as a green theater for official ceremonies and rededicated as the Rose Garden during the John F. Kennedy administration. Here, President Harding and Commissioner of Indian Affairs Charles H. Burke meet with chiefs including Plenty Coups or Alaxchíia Ahú from the Crow nation, and chiefs Frost, Owl, and Red Horse. The chiefs met with Harding at the White House to present him with a tobacco pouch after representing their people at the burial of the Unknown Soldier, held at Arlington National Ceremony on November 11, 1921. Also in attendance at the burial were presidents Woodrow Wilson and William H. Taft and Vice President Calvin Coolidge. Since 1921, presidents have paid their respects at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, often in observance of military commemorations including Veterans Day and Memorial Day.
  • President Coolidge with American Indian Delegation
    Harris & Ewing
    south view
    delegation
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    west view
    In this photograph, President Calvin Coolidge poses alongside a group of American Indian visitors including men, women, and children on the South Grounds of the White House. At left of the group is the the West Garden. The West Garden was reimagined as a green theater for official ceremonies and rededicated as the Rose Garden during the John F. Kennedy administration. Following the enactment of the Indian Citizenship Act in 1924, Coolidge invited delegations from many American Indian nations to the White House. During his presidency, Coolidge increased public perception of the challenges faced by American Indian communities, while promoting assimilation into American society.
  • Coolidge with Native Americans from the Plateau Region
    National Photo Company
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    American Indians
    delegation
    In this photograph, taken on February 18, 1925, President Calvin Coolidge meets with a group of American Indians, possibly from the plateau region in the northwestern United States. Following the enactment of the Indian Citizenship Act in 1924, Coolidge invited delegations from many American Indian nations to the White House. During his presidency, Coolidge increased public perception of the challenges faced by American Indian communities, while promoting assimilation into mainstream American culture.
  • Theodore Roosevelt Centennial Year Conservation Ceremony
    National Park Service
    ceremonies
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    Cabinet
    tree plantings
    This photograph was taken on May 8, 1958, during a ceremony held on the White House South Grounds to commemorate the centennial of President Theodore Roosevelt's birth and his dedication to environmental conservation. As part of the ceremony, President Dwight D. Eisenhower planted an oak tree to replace a tree planted by President Roosevelt in 1904. Roosevelt's oak tree had been south of the East Wing, but in 1956 it was toppled by a storm. Among those present at the ceremony were chief of staff Sherman Adams, Secretary of Agriculture Erza T. Benson, and Secretary of the Interior Fred A. Seaton.
  • Theodore Roosevelt Centennial Year Conservation Ceremony
    National Park Service
    South Grounds
    South Lawn
    tree plantings
    ceremonies
    In this photograph, taken on May 8, 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower plants an oak tree during a ceremony held on the White House South Grounds to commemorate the centennial of President Theodore Roosevelt's birth and his dedication to environmental conservation. As part of the ceremony, President Dwight D. Eisenhower planted an oak tree to replace a tree planted by President Roosevelt in 1904. Roosevelt's oak tree had been south of the East Wing, but in 1956 it was toppled by a storm. Among those present at the ceremony were chief of staff Sherman Adams, Secretary of Agriculture Erza T. Benson, and Secretary of the Interior Fred A. Seaton.
  • Moment of Silence for Victims of September 11th Terrorist Attacks
    David Bohrer
    staff
    commemorations
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    September 11
    In this photograph, taken by David Bohrer on September 18, 2001, President George W. Bush and Vice President Richard B. Cheney join White House staff to observe a moment of silence on the South Lawn honoring the victims of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. The moment of silence ceremony has remained a tradition in the formal observation of September 11th at the White House. In 2002, President Bush designated September 11th as Patriot Day, a time that has been recognized through presidential proclamations as a national day of remembrance, prayer, and service.
  • Moment of Silence for Victims of September 11th Terrorist Attacks
    Paul Morse
    staff
    commemorations
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    south view
    September 11
    In this photograph, taken by Paul Morse on September 18, 2001, President George W. Bush and Vice President Richard B. Cheney join White House staff to observe a moment of silence on the South Lawn honoring the victims of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. The moment of silence ceremony has remained a tradition in the formal observation of September 11th at the White House. In 2002, President Bush designated September 11th as Patriot Day, a time that has been recognized through presidential proclamations as a national day of remembrance, prayer, and service.
  • Moment of Silence, September 11, 2005
    Krisanne Johnson
    staff
    south view
    commemorations
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    September 11
    In this photograph, President George W. Bush, First Lady Laura Welch Bush, Vice President Richard B. Cheney, and Second Lady Lynne V. Cheney join White House staff for a moment of silence on the South Lawn in commemoration of the fourth anniversary of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. In 2002, President Bush designated September 11th as Patriot Day, a time that has been recognized through presidential proclamations as a national day of remembrance, prayer, and service. Presidents and first ladies typically commemorate the day through moment of silence observations on the White House South Lawn, and by attending remembrance ceremonies at sites affected by the terrorist attacks.
  • 9/11 Heroes Medal of Valor Award Ceremony
    Paul Morse
    merits & awards
    ceremonies
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    September 11
    south view
    In this photograph, taken by Paul Morse on September 9, 2005, President George W. Bush delivers remarks on the South Lawn during the presentation ceremony for the 9/11 Heroes Medal of Valor. The medal was created to honor 442 public safety officers, including firefighters, police officers, and emergency medical technicians, who died as a result of performing their duties in the immediate aftermath of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. President Bush invited family members of the fallen officers to the South Lawn ceremony, where they were presented with the posthumous award.
  • Moment of Silence, September 11, 2003
    Unknown
    staff
    south view
    commemorations
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    September 11
    In this photograph, President George W. Bush, First Lady Laura Welch Bush, Vice President Richard B. Cheney, and Second Lady Lynne V. Cheney join White House staff for a moment of silence on the South Lawn in commemoration of the second anniversary of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. In 2002, President Bush designated September 11th as Patriot Day, a time that has been recognized through presidential proclamations as a national day of remembrance, prayer, and service. Presidents and first ladies typically commemorate the day through moment of silence observations on the White House South Lawn, and by attending remembrance ceremonies at sites affected by the terrorist attacks.
  • Moment of Silence, September 11, 2004
    David Bohrer
    commemorations
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    September 11
    In this photograph, President George W. Bush, First Lady Laura Welch Bush, Vice President Richard B. Cheney, and Second Lady Lynne V. Cheney join victims' families for a moment of silence on the South Lawn in commemoration of the third anniversary of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. In 2002, President Bush designated September 11th as Patriot Day, a time that has been recognized through presidential proclamations as a national day of remembrance, prayer, and service. Presidents and first ladies typically commemorate the day through moment of silence observations on the White House South Lawn, and by attending remembrance ceremonies at sites affected by the terrorist attacks.
  • Moment of Silence, September 11, 2020
    Joyce N. Boghosian
    military
    commemorations
    U.S. Marine Band
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    September 11
    This photograph shows a bugler from the United States Marine Band performing taps during a moment of silence ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House in observance of the 19th anniversary of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. In 2002, President Bush designated September 11th as Patriot Day, a time that has been recognized through presidential proclamations as a national day of remembrance, prayer, and service. Presidents and first ladies typically commemorate the day through moment of silence observations on the White House South Lawn, and by attending remembrance ceremonies at sites affected by the terrorist attacks.
  • Moment of Silence, September 11, 2020
    Joyce N. Boghosian
    commemorations
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    south view
    September 11
    This photograph shows a moment of silence ceremony held on the South Lawn of the White House in observance of the 19th anniversary of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. In 2002, President George W. Bush designated September 11th as Patriot Day, a time that has been recognized through presidential proclamations as a national day of remembrance, prayer, and service. Presidents and first ladies typically commemorate the day through moment of silence observations on the White House South Lawn, and by attending remembrance ceremonies at sites affected by the terrorist attacks.
  • Moment of Silence, September 11, 2020
    Joyce N. Boghosian
    military
    commemorations
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    south view
    September 11
    This photograph shows a moment of silence ceremony held on the South Lawn of the White House in observance of the 19th anniversary of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. In 2002, President George W. Bush designated September 11th as Patriot Day, a time that has been recognized through presidential proclamations as a national day of remembrance, prayer, and service. Presidents and first ladies typically commemorate the day through moment of silence observations on the White House South Lawn, and by attending remembrance ceremonies at sites affected by the terrorist attacks.
  • Moment of Silence, September 11, 2019
    Andrea Hanks
    staff
    commemorations
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    September 11
    south view
    In this photograph, President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump join White House staff for a moment of silence on the South Lawn in commemoration of the 18th anniversary of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. In 2002, President George W. Bush designated September 11th as Patriot Day, a time that has been recognized through presidential proclamations as a national day of remembrance, prayer, and service. Presidents and first ladies typically commemorate the day through moment of silence observations on the White House South Lawn, and by attending remembrance ceremonies at sites affected by the terrorist attacks.
  • Moment of Silence, September 11, 2019
    Carlos Fyfe
    staff
    military
    commemorations
    Washington Monument
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    September 11
    In this photograph, President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump depart from the South Lawn following a moment of silence with White House staff in commemoration of the 18th anniversary of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. In 2002, President George W. Bush designated September 11th as Patriot Day, a time that has been recognized through presidential proclamations as a national day of remembrance, prayer, and service. Presidents and first ladies typically commemorate the day through moment of silence observations on the White House South Lawn, and by attending remembrance ceremonies at sites affected by the terrorist attacks.
  • Moment of Silence, September 11, 2019
    Carlos Fyfe
    staff
    military
    commemorations
    Washington Monument
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    September 11
    In this photograph, President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump depart from the South Lawn following a moment of silence with White House staff in commemoration of the 18th anniversary of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. In 2002, President George W. Bush designated September 11th as Patriot Day, a time that has been recognized through presidential proclamations as a national day of remembrance, prayer, and service. Presidents and first ladies typically commemorate the day through moment of silence observations on the White House South Lawn, and by attending remembrance ceremonies at sites affected by the terrorist attacks.
  • Moment of Silence, September 11, 2019
    Andrea Hanks
    military
    flags
    commemorations
    U.S. Marine Band
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    September 11
    west view
    In this photograph, a flag detail and a lone bugler from the United States Marine Band march across the South Grounds in front of the Rose Garden in advance of a moment of silence held on the South Lawn to commemorate the 18th anniversary of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. In 2002, President George W. Bush designated September 11th as Patriot Day, a time that has been recognized through presidential proclamations as a national day of remembrance, prayer, and service. Presidents and first ladies typically commemorate the day through moment of silence observations on the White House South Lawn, and by attending remembrance ceremonies at sites affected by the terrorist attacks.