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  • President and Mrs. Nixon at Tricia's Wedding
    Oliver F. Atkins
    wedding
    music
    military
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    In this photograph, President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon walk with the departing processional following their daughter Tricia's wedding in the Rose Garden on June 12, 1971. Approximately 400 guests watched the first daughter marry law student Edward Cox in the Rose Garden. This was the first outdoor wedding ceremony ever held at the White House. This photograph is part of a personal collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. As executive chef from 1966-1987, Haller oversaw food preparations for three wedding receptions at the White House for first daughters Luci Baines Johnson, Lynda Bird Johnson, and Tricia Nixon.
  • Henry Haller and John W. Ficklin in Jacqueline Kennedy Garden
    Unknown
    staff
    South Grounds
    Jacqueline Kennedy Garden
    In this photograph, White House Executive Chef Henry Haller stands with maître d'hôtel John W. Ficklin in the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden. This photograph was taken in 1966 or 1967, during the administration of Lyndon B. Johnson. The garden, located outside the East Wing, was formerly known as the East Garden and First Lady's Garden before being renamed in honor of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy in 1965. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987, catering to five first families and their distinguished guests.
  • President Nixon Escorts Tricia at her Rose Garden Wedding
    Unknown
    wedding
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    In this photograph, President Richard M. Nixon walks his daughter Tricia down the aisle for her wedding to Edward Cox on June 12, 1971. The outdoor wedding ceremony was held in the Rose Garden of the White House. This was the 16th documented wedding to occur at the White House, and the first to be held in the Rose Garden. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Chef Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987, and oversaw the food preparations for the White House wedding receptions of first daughters Luci Baines Johnson, Lynda Bird Johnson, and Nixon.
  • Johnson Family in the Rose Garden
    Unknown
    South Grounds
    First Family
    Rose Garden
    In this photograph, likely taken in 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson stands with his growing family in the Rose Garden. From left: First Lady Lady Bird Johnson; the Johnson's eldest daughter, Lynda Bird Johnson; President Johnson; the Johnson's younger daughter, Luci Baines Johnson, holding her newborn son, Patrick Lyndon; and Patrick Nugent, Luci's husband. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Henry Haller served as the White House Executive Chef from 1966-1987, during the presidencies of Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard M. Nixon, Gerald R. Ford, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan. Chef Henry Haller oversaw the food preparations for the wedding receptions of Luci Baines Johnson in 1966 and Lynda Bird Johnson in 1967.
  • Henry Haller and John W. Ficklin in Jacqueline Kennedy Garden
    Unknown
    Jacqueline Kennedy Garden
    South Grounds
    staff
    In this photograph, maître d'hôtel John W. Ficklin chats with White House Executive Chef Henry Haller in the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden. This photograph was taken in 1966 or 1967, during the administration of Lyndon B. Johnson. The garden, located outside the East Wing, was formerly known as the East Garden and First Lady's Garden before being renamed in honor of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy in 1965. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Henry Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987, serving five first families and their distinguished guests.
  • President Nixon Signs Double "V" at Dinner Honoring Vietnam POWs
    Unknown
    staff
    military
    event
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    This photograph was taken on May 24, 1973 during a dinner hosted by President Richard M. Nixon to honor former Prisoners of War (POW) from the Vietnam War and their wives. The event was held under a large orange-and-yellow tent on the South Lawn. Entertainers included comedian Bob Hope, songwriter Irving Berlin, entertainer Sammy Davis, Jr., and actors John Wayne and James Stewart. With 1,300 guests, it was the largest sit-down meal ever held at the White House until March 26, 1979, when a State Dinner celebrating the signing of the historic Egyptian-Israeli Peace Treaty had 1,340 guests. In this photograph, President Nixon greets the applauding audience with a "double victory" sign, a gesture he frequently used to signify victory in Vietnam. This photograph is part of a personal collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. As executive chef from 1966-1987, Haller oversaw the food preparations for the massive Vietnam POW dinner and the larger Egyptian-Israeli Peace Treaty State Dinner.
  • Henry Haller and John W. Ficklin in Jacqueline Kennedy Garden
    Unknown
    staff
    Jacqueline Kennedy Garden
    South Grounds
    In this photograph, maître d'hôtel John W. Ficklin chats with White House Executive Chef Henry Haller in the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden. This photograph was taken in 1966 or 1967, during the administration of Lyndon B. Johnson. The garden, located outside the East Wing, was formerly known as the East Garden and First Lady's Garden before being renamed in honor of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy in 1965. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Henry Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987, serving five first families and their distinguished guests.
  • Tricia Nixon and Edward Cox Wedding Ceremony
    Oliver F. Atkins
    First Family
    Rose Garden
    wedding
    South Grounds
    In this photograph, taken June 12, 1971, Tricia Nixon exchanges vows with Edward Cox during their wedding ceremony held in the gazebo of the White House Rose Garden. Theirs was the 16th documented wedding to take place at the White House and the first to be held in the Rose Garden. Nixon was the daughter of President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987, and oversaw food preparations for the wedding receptions for three first daughters: Luci Baines Johnson, Lynda Bird Johnson, and Nixon.
  • President Ford Returns from a Swim
    Karl Schumacher
    South Grounds
    West Wing
    sports
    White House Guests
    In this official White House photograph, taken on July 1, 1975 by Karl Schumacher, President Gerald R. Ford returns to the West Wing following a swim in the new pool on the South Grounds. The windows to the Oval Office can be seen on the left. During the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration, an indoor pool was installed in the West Wing, but this converted into the Press Room during the Richard M. Nixon administration in 1970. An avid swimmer, President Ford oversaw the installation of an outdoor pool in 1975. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Set-up for "Salute to Congress" Picnic and Dance
    Unknown
    South Grounds
    South Lawn
    event
    In this photograph, taken June 11, 1980, crew members set up a nautical setting on the South Grounds ahead of a Congressional picnic. The "Salute to Congress" was hosted by President Jimmy Carter, and featured an outdoor picnic, music, and dancing. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Marine One Flies Over South Lawn, Reagan Administration
    Unknown
    transportation
    South Lawn
    South Grounds
    Marine One
    This photograph of Marine One, the private helicopter of the president, hovering over the South Grounds was taken during the administration of President Ronald Reagan. Helicopters have been an integral part of presidential transportation since 1957, when President Dwight D. Eisenhower became the first sitting president to fly in a helicopter. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987.
  • State Dinner for the Signing of the Egyptian-Israeli Peace Treaty
    Unknown
    State Dinner
    South Grounds
    White House Guests
    military
    food
    This photograph was taken during a State Dinner held on the South Lawn on March 26, 1979. President Jimmy Carter held the dinner to honor President Anwar Sadat of Egypt and Prime Minister Menachem Begin of Israel, who were at the White House to sign a historic peace treaty between Israel and Egypt. With 1,340 guests, at the time it was the largest sit-down dinner ever recorded in White House history. The dinner featured a seafood mousse, strip sirloin with spring vegetables, and a rich hazelnut-chocolate mousse for dessert. In addition, 110 kosher meals were delivered by a local caterer. On less hectic occasions where kosher food is required, a rabbi visits the White House Kitchen to ensure food preparation areas meet kosher standards. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Henry Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987, during the presidencies of Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard M. Nixon, Gerald R. Ford, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan.
  • Garden Tour Program, Carter Administration
    White House Calligraphy Office
    program
    South Grounds
    This is the front cover of a program created for a public White House gardens and grounds tour during the administration of President Jimmy Carter (1977-1981). The program includes a greeting from First Lady Rosalynn Carter, a map of the South Grounds including sites of presidential tree plantings, and information about the history of the gardens and their uses. Before the late-19th century, private citizens wandered the White House South Grounds like a public park, but by the Calvin Coolidge administration (1923-1929), the grounds were closed to the public due to security and privacy concerns. However, just as First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy opened the White House to the public with controlled public tours, in 1972 First Lady Pat Nixon established the tradition of hosting White House garden tours. During the anticipated event, which expanded to being held two weekends a year, lucky members of the public have a chance to view the first family's private gardens. To view the complete program, see 1127095. This program is part of a personal collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served five first families and their distinguished guests as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Garden Tour Program, Carter Administration
    White House Calligraphy Office
    program
    South Grounds
    This program for a public White House gardens and grounds tour was created during the administration of President Jimmy Carter (1977-1981). The program includes a greeting from First Lady Rosalynn Carter, a map of the South Grounds including sites of presidential tree plantings, and information about the history of the gardens and their uses. Before the late-19th century, private citizens wandered the White House South Grounds like a public park, but by the Calvin Coolidge administration (1923-1929), the grounds were closed to the public due to security and privacy concerns. However, just as First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy opened the White House to the public with controlled public tours, in 1972 First Lady Pat Nixon established the tradition of White House garden tours. During the anticipated event, which expanded to being held two weekends a year, lucky members of the public have a chance to view the first family's private gardens. This program is part of a personal collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served five first families and their distinguished guests as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Garden Tour Program, Carter Administration
    White House Calligraphy Office
    program
    South Grounds
    This is the back of a folded internal page of a program created for a public White House gardens and grounds tour during the administration of President Jimmy Carter (1977-1981). The program includes a greeting from First Lady Rosalynn Carter, a map of the South Grounds including sites of presidential tree plantings, and information about the history of the gardens and their uses. Before the late-19th century, private citizens wandered the White House South Grounds like a public park, but by the Calvin Coolidge administration (1923-1929), the grounds were closed to the public due to security and privacy concerns. However, just as First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy opened the White House to the public with controlled public tours, in 1972 First Lady Pat Nixon established the tradition of hosting White House garden tours. During the anticipated event, which expanded to being held two weekends a year, lucky members of the public have a chance to view the first family's private gardens. To view the complete program, see 1127095. This program is part of a personal collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served five first families and their distinguished guests as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Garden Tour Program, Carter Administration
    White House Calligraphy Office
    program
    South Grounds
    This is the folded internal page of a program created for a public White House gardens and grounds tour during the administration of President Jimmy Carter (1977-1981). The program includes a greeting from First Lady Rosalynn Carter, a map of the South Grounds including sites of presidential tree plantings, and information about the history of the gardens and their uses. Before the late-19th century, private citizens wandered the White House South Grounds like a public park, but by the Calvin Coolidge administration (1923-1929), the grounds were closed to the public due to security and privacy concerns. However, just as First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy opened the White House to the public with controlled public tours, in 1972 First Lady Pat Nixon established the tradition of hosting White House garden tours. During the anticipated event, which expanded to being held two weekends a year, lucky members of the public have a chance to view the first family's private gardens. To view the complete program, see 1127095. This program is part of a personal collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served five first families and their distinguished guests as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Garden Tour Program, Carter Administration
    White House Calligraphy Office
    program
    South Grounds
    drawings & plans
    maps
    This is the unfolded internal page of a program created for a public White House gardens and grounds tour during the administration of President Jimmy Carter (1977-1981). The program includes a greeting from First Lady Rosalynn Carter, a map of the South Grounds including sites of presidential tree plantings, and information about the history of the gardens and their uses. Before the late-19th century, private citizens wandered the White House South Grounds like a public park, but by the Calvin Coolidge administration (1923-1929), the grounds were closed to the public due to security and privacy concerns. However, just as First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy opened the White House to the public with controlled public tours, in 1972 First Lady Pat Nixon established the tradition of hosting White House garden tours. During the anticipated event, which expanded to being held two weekends a year, lucky members of the public have a chance to view the first family's private gardens. To view the complete program, see 1127095. This program is part of a personal collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served five first families and their distinguished guests as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Garden Tour Program, Carter Administration
    White House Calligraphy Office
    program
    South Grounds
    This is the inside back cover of a program created for a public White House gardens and grounds tour during the administration of President Jimmy Carter (1977-1981). The program includes a greeting from First Lady Rosalynn Carter, a map of the South Grounds including sites of presidential tree plantings, and information about the history of the gardens and their uses. Before the late-19th century, private citizens wandered the White House South Grounds like a public park, but by the Calvin Coolidge administration (1923-1929), the grounds were closed to the public due to security and privacy concerns. However, just as First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy opened the White House to the public with controlled public tours, in 1972 First Lady Pat Nixon established the tradition of hosting White House garden tours. During the anticipated event, which expanded to being held two weekends a year, lucky members of the public have a chance to view the first family's private gardens. To view the complete program, see 1127095. This program is part of a personal collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served five first families and their distinguished guests as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Butter the Turkey at 2019 Pardoning Ceremony
    Matthew D'Agostino
    holidays
    Turkey Pardon
    Thanksgiving
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    This photograph of Butter, one of a pair of presidential turkeys, and a handler was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on November 26, 2019. President Donald Trump officially "pardoned" Butter during the day's ceremony. Following the ceremony, the pair of turkeys, named Bread and Butter, were transferred to 'Gobblers Rest' reserve in Blacksburg, Virginia to be cared for by veterinarians and students of Virginia Tech's Animal and Poultry Sciences Department. Presidents and their families have received turkeys for the holidays as far back as the 1870s. However, the origin of the turkey pardon is said to have started with President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, after he offered clemency to a turkey purchased for Christmas dinner at his son's request. The pardoning of a Thanksgiving turkey became a formalized tradition during the Ronald Reagan administration.
  • Butter the Turkey at 2019 Pardoning Ceremony
    Matthew D'Agostino
    holidays
    Turkey Pardon
    Thanksgiving
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    This photograph of Butter, one of a pair of presidential turkeys, and a handler was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on November 26, 2019. President Donald Trump officially "pardoned" Butter during the day's ceremony. Following the ceremony, the pair of turkeys, named Bread and Butter, were transferred to 'Gobblers Rest' reserve in Blacksburg, Virginia to be cared for by veterinarians and students of Virginia Tech's Animal and Poultry Sciences Department. Presidents and their families have received turkeys for the holidays as far back as the 1870s. However, the origin of the turkey pardon is said to have started with President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, after he offered clemency to a turkey purchased for Christmas dinner at his son's request. The pardoning of a Thanksgiving turkey became a formalized tradition during the Ronald Reagan administration.
  • Butter the Turkey at 2019 Pardoning Ceremony
    Matthew D'Agostino
    holidays
    Turkey Pardon
    Thanksgiving
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    This photograph of Butter, one of a pair of presidential turkeys, and a handler was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on November 26, 2019. President Donald Trump officially "pardoned" Butter during the day's ceremony. Following the ceremony, the pair of turkeys, named Bread and Butter, were transferred to 'Gobblers Rest' reserve in Blacksburg, Virginia to be cared for by veterinarians and students of Virginia Tech's Animal and Poultry Sciences Department. Presidents and their families have received turkeys for the holidays as far back as the 1870s. However, the origin of the turkey pardon is said to have started with President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, after he offered clemency to a turkey purchased for Christmas dinner at his son's request. The pardoning of a Thanksgiving turkey became a formalized tradition during the Ronald Reagan administration.
  • Butter the Turkey at 2019 Pardoning Ceremony
    Matthew D'Agostino
    holidays
    Turkey Pardon
    Thanksgiving
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    This photograph of Butter, one of a pair of presidential turkeys to be pardoned, was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on November 26, 2019. President Donald Trump officially "pardoned" Butter that day during a ceremony. Following the ceremony, the pair, named Bread and Butter, were transferred to 'Gobblers Rest' reserve in Blacksburg, Virginia to be cared for by veterinarians and students of Virginia Tech's Animal and Poultry Sciences Department. Presidents and their families have received turkeys for the holidays as far back as the 1870s. However, the origin of the turkey pardon is said to have started with President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, after he offered clemency to a turkey purchased for Christmas dinner at his son's request. The pardoning of a Thanksgiving turkey became a formalized tradition during the Ronald Reagan administration.
  • Butter the Turkey at 2019 Pardoning Ceremony
    Matthew D'Agostino
    holidays
    Turkey Pardon
    Thanksgiving
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    This photograph of Butter, one of a pair of presidential turkeys to be pardoned, was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on November 26, 2019. President Donald Trump officially "pardoned" Butter that day during a ceremony. Following the ceremony, the pair, named Bread and Butter, were transferred to 'Gobblers Rest' reserve in Blacksburg, Virginia to be cared for by veterinarians and students of Virginia Tech's Animal and Poultry Sciences Department. Presidents and their families have received turkeys for the holidays as far back as the 1870s. However, the origin of the turkey pardon is said to have started with President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, after he offered clemency to a turkey purchased for Christmas dinner at his son's request. The pardoning of a Thanksgiving turkey became a formalized tradition during the Ronald Reagan administration.
  • Butter the Turkey at 2019 Pardoning Ceremony
    Matthew D'Agostino
    holidays
    Turkey Pardon
    Thanksgiving
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    This photograph of Butter, one of a pair of presidential turkeys to be pardoned, and representatives from the National Turkey Federation was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on November 26, 2019. President Donald Trump officially "pardoned" Butter that day during a ceremony. Following the ceremony, the pair, named Bread and Butter, were transferred to 'Gobblers Rest' reserve in Blacksburg, Virginia to be cared for by veterinarians and students of Virginia Tech's Animal and Poultry Sciences Department. Presidents and their families have received turkeys for the holidays as far back as the 1870s. However, the origin of the turkey pardon is said to have started with President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, after he offered clemency to a turkey purchased for Christmas dinner at his son's request. The pardoning of a Thanksgiving turkey became a formalized tradition during the Ronald Reagan administration.
  • President and Mrs. Trump Depart 2019 Turkey Pardon
    Matthew D'Agostino
    holidays
    Thanksgiving
    Turkey Pardon
    Rose Garden
    South Grounds
    This photograph of President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump returning to the White House following a turkey pardoning ceremony was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on November 26, 2019. President Trump pardoned Butter that year, one of a pair of presidential turkeys. Following the ceremony, the pair of turkeys, named Bread and Butter, were transferred to 'Gobblers Rest' reserve in Blacksburg, Virginia to be cared for by veterinarians and students of Virginia Tech's Animal and Poultry Sciences Department. Presidents and their families have received turkeys for the holidays as far back as the 1870s. However, the origin of the turkey pardon is said to have started with President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, after he offered clemency to a turkey purchased for Christmas dinner at his son's request. The pardoning of a Thanksgiving turkey became a formalized tradition during the Ronald Reagan administration.