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  • Nixon Family Portrait
    Karl Schumacher
    portrait
    First Family
    Second Floor
    Yellow Oval Room
    This portrait of President Richard M. Nixon with his family in the Yellow Oval Room was taken on Father's Day, June 15, 1969. Pictured from left: the president's son-in-law, David Eisenhower; the president's youngest daughter, Julie Nixon Eisenhower; President Nixon; First Lady Pat Nixon; and Tricia Nixon, the president's eldest daughter. This photograph is part of the collection of former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. As executive chef from 1966-1987, Haller catered to the taste of five first families and their distinguished guests.
  • Tricia Nixon and Edward Cox on their Wedding Day
    Karl Schumacher
    wedding
    South Portico
    First Family
    In this photograph, taken on June 12, 1971, newlyweds Tricia Nixon and Edward Cox stand together on the balcony of the South Portico of the White House. Approximately 400 guests witnessed the couple exchange vows during their ceremony in the Rose Garden. Theirs was the first outdoor wedding ever held at the White House. This photograph is part of a personal collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. As executive chef from 1966-1987, Haller oversaw food preparations for three wedding receptions at the White House.
  • Lynda Bird Johnson with Daughter Lucinda Desha Robb
    Unknown
    First Family
    This photograph, taken October 31, 1968, shows a proud Lynda Bird Johnson Robb cradling her newborn daughter, Lucinda Desha Robb on the day the infant left Bethesda Naval Hospital to come home to the White House. Born on October 25, 1968, Lucinda was the first child of Lynda Bird and her husband, Capt. Charles S. Robb. When Lucinda was born, Capt. Robb was serving in Vietnam. Lynda Bird and Charles would later welcome two more daughters, Catherine and Jennifer. This photograph is part of a personal collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. As executive chef from 1966-1987, Haller catered to the tastes of five first families and their distinguished guests.
  • Lynda Bird Johnson and Charles Robb Wed in the East Room
    Unknown
    wedding
    State Floor
    First Family
    East Room
    military
    In this photograph, taken December 9, 1967, newlyweds Lynda Bird Johnson Robb and Capt. Charles S. Robb take their first steps together as man and wife following their wedding ceremony in the East Room of the White House. The ceremony was officiated by the Right Reverend Gerald Nicholas McAllister. This was the 15th wedding held at the White House. The couple enjoyed their wedding cake in the same room where they were married. During the ceremony, the cake was hidden behind a screen, which was removed when guests returned to the East Room for champagne, cake, and dancing. Fellow White House bride Alice Roosevelt Longworth, who married in 1906, was among the approximately 500 guests who attended the wedding. The bride's parents, President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson, can be seen watching proudly on the left side of this photograph. This photograph is part of a personal collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. As executive chef from 1966-1987, Haller oversaw the food preparations for three wedding receptions at the White House for first daughters Luci Baines Johnson, Lynda Bird Johnson, and Tricia Nixon.
  • Tricia Nixon's Wedding Party
    Oliver F. Atkins
    Blue Room
    State Floor
    wedding
    First Family
    In this photograph, newlyweds Tricia Nixon and Edward Cox join family members and their wedding party in the Blue Room. Tricia's parents, President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon stand near Tricia, along with their younger daughter, Julie Nixon Eisenhower. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987, overseeing the food preparations for the White House wedding receptions for three first daughters: Luci Baines Johnson, Lynda Bird Johnson, and Nixon.
  • Luci Johnson and Patrick Nugent on their Wedding Day
    Unknown
    wedding
    press
    First Family
    In this photograph, members of the press eagerly record first daughter Luci Baines Johnson and Patrick Nugent on their wedding day, August 6, 1966. The couple was married at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C. and enjoyed a reception at the White House. Johnson was the daughter of President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Henry Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987. Chef Haller oversaw the food preparations for Johnson's wedding reception as well as the receptions for first daughters Lynda Bird Johnson and Tricia Nixon.
  • Johnson Family in the Rose Garden
    Unknown
    South Grounds
    First Family
    Rose Garden
    In this photograph, likely taken in 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson stands with his growing family in the Rose Garden. From left: First Lady Lady Bird Johnson; the Johnson's eldest daughter, Lynda Bird Johnson; President Johnson; the Johnson's younger daughter, Luci Baines Johnson, holding her newborn son, Patrick Lyndon; and Patrick Nugent, Luci's husband. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Henry Haller served as the White House Executive Chef from 1966-1987, during the presidencies of Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard M. Nixon, Gerald R. Ford, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan. Chef Henry Haller oversaw the food preparations for the wedding receptions of Luci Baines Johnson in 1966 and Lynda Bird Johnson in 1967.
  • Tricia Nixon and Edward Cox's Wedding
    Oliver F. Atkins
    First Family
    Rose Garden
    wedding
    In this photograph, taken June 12, 1971, Tricia Nixon walks down the aisle alongside her new husband Edward Cox following her wedding ceremony held in the White House Rose Garden. The wedding of the eldest daughter of President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon was the 16th documented wedding to take place at the White House and the first to be held in the Rose Garden. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987, and oversaw the food preparations for the White House wedding receptions of three first daughters: Luci Baines Johnson, Lynda Bird Johnson, and Nixon.
  • Tricia Nixon and Edward Cox Cut Wedding Cake
    Robert L. Knudsen
    Entrance Hall
    First Family
    State Floor
    food
    wedding
    In this photograph, taken June 12, 1971, newly married Tricia Nixon cuts into her wedding cake with the assistance of her husband, Edward Cox. The Nixon-Cox wedding ceremony was conducted in the Rose Garden of the White House, while the reception was held in the Entrance Hall. The six-layer, roughly seven-foot tall cake was designed by New York pastry chef Maurice Bonté, who in 1966 designed the wedding cake for first daughter Luci Baines Johnson. Nixon was the daughter of President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Henry Haller served as the White House Executive Chef from 1966-1987, overseeing the food preparations for three wedding receptions.
  • Luci Baines Johnson's Wedding Reception
    Unknown
    wedding
    South Portico
    First Family
    This photograph was taken on August 6, 1966 during the wedding reception for Luci Baines Johnson and Patrick Nugent. The couple was married at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C. and enjoyed their reception at the White House. The newly married couple stands on the South Portico, flanked by their parents, including President Lyndon B. Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson. Luci's bridesmaids are pictured descending the eastern stairs of the South Portico, wearing matching pink dresses and veils. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987. Chef Haller oversaw the food preparations for Luci Baines Johnson's wedding reception.
  • President Nixon with Tricia and Edward Cox at their Wedding Reception
    Robert L. Knudsen
    Entrance Hall
    State Floor
    wedding
    First Family
    staff
    food
    White House Guests
    In this photograph, President Richard M. Nixon congratulates his daughter Tricia and her new husband Edward Cox during their wedding reception in the Entrance Hall of the White House on June 12, 1971. Tricia's wedding cake, which stood at approximately seven-feet high, was designed by New York pastry chef Maurice Bonté. In this photograph, maitre d'hotel John W. Ficklin stands beside the president. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987, and oversaw the food preparations for the White House wedding receptions of three first daughters: Luci Baines Johnson, Lynda Bird Johnson, and Nixon.
  • Tricia Nixon and Edward Cox Wedding Ceremony
    Oliver F. Atkins
    First Family
    Rose Garden
    wedding
    South Grounds
    In this photograph, taken June 12, 1971, Tricia Nixon exchanges vows with Edward Cox during their wedding ceremony held in the gazebo of the White House Rose Garden. Theirs was the 16th documented wedding to take place at the White House and the first to be held in the Rose Garden. Nixon was the daughter of President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987, and oversaw food preparations for the wedding receptions for three first daughters: Luci Baines Johnson, Lynda Bird Johnson, and Nixon.
  • Tricia Nixon and Edward Cox on the North Portico
    Karl Schumacher
    wedding
    press
    North Portico
    First Family
    In this photograph, a beaming Tricia Nixon looks up at her new husband Edward Cox outside the North Door to the White House as her father, President Richard M. Nixon, looks on. The outdoor wedding ceremony for Nixon and Cox was held in the Rose Garden of the White House on June 12, 1971. It was the 16th documented wedding to occur at the White House, and the first to be conducted in the Rose Garden. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987, and oversaw the food preparations for the White House wedding receptions for three first daughters: Luci Baines Johnson, Lynda Bird Johnson, and Nixon.
  • Tricia Nixon and Edward Cox Cut Wedding Cake
    Robert L. Knudsen
    Entrance Hall
    wedding
    State Floor
    First Family
    White House Guests
    food
    In this photograph, taken June 12, 1971, newly married Tricia Nixon cuts into her wedding cake with the assistance of her husband, Edward Cox. The Nixon-Cox wedding ceremony was conducted in the Rose Garden of the White House, while the reception was held in the Entrance Hall. The six-layer, roughly seven-foot tall cake was designed by New York pastry chef Maurice Bonté, who in 1966 designed the wedding cake for first daughter Luci Baines Johnson. Nixon was the daughter of President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987, and also oversaw the food preparations for the White House wedding reception of Lynda Bird Johnson.
  • Tricia Nixon
    Robert L. Knudsen
    portrait
    East Colonnade
    East Wing
    First Family
    This photographic portrait of Tricia Nixon was taken around March 24, 1969. The eldest daughter of President Richard M. Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon, Tricia's wedding in the White House Rose Garden to Edward Cox on June 12, 1971 captivated the American public. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef of the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Nixon Family Portrait
    Karl Schumacher
    portrait
    First Family
    Yellow Oval Room
    Second Floor
    This portrait of President M. Nixon and his family was taken on June 15, 1969 in the Yellow Oval Room. Pictured from left: David Eisenhower, grandson of President Dwight D. Eisenhower and First Lady Mamie Doud Eisenhower; his wife Julie Nixon Eisenhower, youngest daughter of President Nixon; President Nixon; First Lady Pat Nixon; and their eldest daughter Tricia Nixon. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as the executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987.
  • The Reagans Join "Hands Across America"
    Pete Souza
    staff
    north view
    event
    children
    North Portico
    First Families
    In this photograph, taken May 25, 1986, President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan descend from the North Door to take part in "Hands Across America." During the charity event, designed to raise awareness for homelessness and famine, over five million Americans from across the continental United States formed a human chain and held hands for 15 minutes. Among those who participated in "Hands Across America" near the North Portico were President Reagan's daughter Maureen Reagan, her husband Dennis Revell, and White House press secretary James S. Brady. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Haller served as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Ford Family Portrait
    David Hume Kennerly
    East Sitting Hall
    Second Floor
    First Family
    pets
    portrait
    This photographic portrait of President Gerald R. Ford and his family was taken in the East Sitting Hall. The children of President Ford and First Lady Betty Ford stand behind their parents. From left: Susan Ford, Steve Ford, Jack Ford, Mike Ford, and Mike's wife, Gayle Ann Ford. President and Mrs. Ford's loyal Golden Retriever, Liberty, sits in front of the group. This photograph is part of a collection belonging to former White House Executive Chef Henry Haller. Henry Haller served five first families and their distinguished guests as executive chef at the White House from 1966-1987.
  • Tiffany Trump Attends 2019 Turkey Pardon
    Matthew D'Agostino
    holidays
    Turkey Pardon
    Thanksgiving
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    First Family
    This photograph of Tiffany Trump, youngest daughter of President Donald Trump, talking to guests during the turkey pardoning ceremony was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on November 26, 2019. Among the guests are members of Congress. President Trump pardoned Butter, one of a pair of presidential turkeys. Following the ceremony, the pair, named Bread and Butter, were transferred to 'Gobblers Rest' reserve in Blacksburg, Virginia to be cared for by veterinarians and students of Virginia Tech's Animal and Poultry Sciences Department. Presidents and their families have received turkeys for the holidays as far back as the 1870s. However, the origin of the turkey pardon is said to have started with President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, after he offered clemency to a turkey purchased for Christmas dinner at his son's request. The pardoning of a Thanksgiving turkey became a formalized tradition during the Ronald Reagan administration.
  • Tiffany Trump Attends 2019 Turkey Pardon
    Matthew D'Agostino
    holidays
    Turkey Pardon
    Thanksgiving
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    First Family
    This photograph of Tiffany Trump, youngest daughter of President Donald Trump, talking to guests during the turkey pardoning ceremony was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on November 26, 2019. Among the guests are members of Congress. President Trump pardoned Butter, one of a pair of presidential turkeys. Following the ceremony, the pair, named Bread and Butter, were transferred to 'Gobblers Rest' reserve in Blacksburg, Virginia to be cared for by veterinarians and students of Virginia Tech's Animal and Poultry Sciences Department. Presidents and their families have received turkeys for the holidays as far back as the 1870s. However, the origin of the turkey pardon is said to have started with President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, after he offered clemency to a turkey purchased for Christmas dinner at his son's request. The pardoning of a Thanksgiving turkey became a formalized tradition during the Ronald Reagan administration.
  • Tiffany Trump Attends 2019 Turkey Pardon
    Matthew D'Agostino
    holidays
    Turkey Pardon
    Thanksgiving
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    First Family
    This photograph of Tiffany Trump, youngest daughter of President Donald Trump, talking to guests during the turkey pardoning ceremony was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on November 26, 2019. Among the guests are members of Congress. President Trump pardoned Butter, one of a pair of presidential turkeys. Following the ceremony, the pair, named Bread and Butter, were transferred to 'Gobblers Rest' reserve in Blacksburg, Virginia to be cared for by veterinarians and students of Virginia Tech's Animal and Poultry Sciences Department. Presidents and their families have received turkeys for the holidays as far back as the 1870s. However, the origin of the turkey pardon is said to have started with President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, after he offered clemency to a turkey purchased for Christmas dinner at his son's request. The pardoning of a Thanksgiving turkey became a formalized tradition during the Ronald Reagan administration.
  • Tiffany Trump Attends 2019 Turkey Pardon
    Matthew D'Agostino
    holidays
    Turkey Pardon
    Thanksgiving
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    First Family
    This photograph of Tiffany Trump, youngest daughter of President Donald Trump, talking to guests during the turkey pardoning ceremony was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on November 26, 2019. Among the guests are members of Congress. President Trump pardoned Butter, one of a pair of presidential turkeys. Following the ceremony, the pair, named Bread and Butter, were transferred to 'Gobblers Rest' reserve in Blacksburg, Virginia to be cared for by veterinarians and students of Virginia Tech's Animal and Poultry Sciences Department. Presidents and their families have received turkeys for the holidays as far back as the 1870s. However, the origin of the turkey pardon is said to have started with President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, after he offered clemency to a turkey purchased for Christmas dinner at his son's request. The pardoning of a Thanksgiving turkey became a formalized tradition during the Ronald Reagan administration.
  • Turkey Pardoning Ceremony, 2016
    Matthew D'Agostino
    holidays
    Turkey Pardon
    Thanksgiving
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    First Family
    This photograph, taken by Matthew D'Agostino for the White House Historical Association on November 23, 2016, shows President Barack Obama and his nephews Austin and Aaron Robinson leaving the Rose Garden following the annual White House turkey pardoning ceremony. During the ceremony, President Obama pardoned Tot, a 39 pound turkey as well as an alternate turkey, Tater. Following the ceremony, the turkeys were transferred to 'Gobblers Rest' in Blacksburg, Virginia to be cared for by veterinarians and students of Virginia Tech's Animal and Poultry Sciences Department. Both turkeys were raised by the Domino family in Iowa, and were donated by the National Turkey Federation. For his final turkey pardoning ceremony, President Obama shared a "corny-copia" of turkey-themed puns and spoke of recent achievements Americans could be thankful for.
  • Turkey Pardoning Ceremony, 2016
    Matthew D'Agostino
    holidays
    Turkey Pardon
    Thanksgiving
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    First Family
    This photograph, taken by Matthew D'Agostino for the White House Historical Association on November 23, 2016, shows President Barack Obama and his nephews Austin and Aaron Robinson leaving the Rose Garden following the annual White House turkey pardoning ceremony. During the ceremony, President Obama pardoned Tot, a 39 pound turkey as well as an alternate turkey, Tater. Following the ceremony, the turkeys were transferred to 'Gobblers Rest' in Blacksburg, Virginia to be cared for by veterinarians and students of Virginia Tech's Animal and Poultry Sciences Department. Both turkeys were raised by the Domino family in Iowa, and were donated by the National Turkey Federation. For his final turkey pardoning ceremony, President Obama shared a "corny-copia" of turkey-themed puns and spoke of recent achievements Americans could be thankful for.
  • Turkey Pardoning Ceremony, 2016
    Matthew D'Agostino
    holidays
    Turkey Pardon
    Thanksgiving
    South Grounds
    Rose Garden
    First Family
    This photograph, taken by Matthew D'Agostino for the White House Historical Association on November 23, 2016, shows President Barack Obama and his nephews Austin and Aaron Robinson leaving the Rose Garden following the annual White House turkey pardoning ceremony. During the ceremony, President Obama pardoned Tot, a 39 pound turkey as well as an alternate turkey, Tater. Following the ceremony, the turkeys were transferred to 'Gobblers Rest' in Blacksburg, Virginia to be cared for by veterinarians and students of Virginia Tech's Animal and Poultry Sciences Department. Both turkeys were raised by the Domino family in Iowa, and were donated by the National Turkey Federation. For his final turkey pardoning ceremony, President Obama shared a "corny-copia" of turkey-themed puns and spoke of recent achievements Americans could be thankful for.