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  • President Obama Meets with FIFA Representatives
    Pete Souza
    sports
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    White House Guests
    In this photograph by Pete Souza, President Barack Obama meets with representatives from FIFA (Federal Internationale de Football Association) on July 27, 2009 in the Oval Office. President of FIFA, Joseph S. "Sepp" Blatter, is seated to President Obama's left and presented Obama with jerseys for his two daughters, Malia and Sasha. Obama welcomed Blatter to the White House to discuss the the United States' bid to host the FIFA Men's World Cup in 2018 or 2022, which would ultimately go to Russia and Qatar.
  • President Obama Watches the United States Compete in the World Cup
    Pete Souza
    sports
    Eisenhower Executive Office Building
    In this photograph by Pete Souza, President Barack Obama watches the United States Men's National Soccer team play Belgium in the FIFA Men's World Cup on July 1, 2014. President Obama watched the game with staff in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building's South Court Auditorium. The United States played Belgium in the knockout stage, ultimately losing 1-2 to the European nation.
  • Oval Office, Biden Administration
    Bruce White
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    This photograph of the Oval Office during the Joseph R. Biden administration was taken on June 9, 2021 by Bruce White. Before 1909, the president's office was located in the Executive Mansion. During the William H. Taft administration, the West Wing doubled in size from the 1902 renovation and included a presidential oval office. In 1934, during the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration, the West Wing was expanded and renovated, with the Oval Office relocated to the West Wing’s southeast corner.
  • Presidential Seal, Oval Office Ceiling
    Bruce White
    Presidential Seal
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    This is a plaster relief of the Presidential Seal on the ceiling of the Oval Office in the West Wing. The seal was photographed by Bruce White on June 9, 2021 during the Joseph R. Biden administration.
  • Oval Office, Biden Administration
    Bruce White
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    This photograph of the Oval Office during the Joseph R. Biden administration was taken on June 9, 2021 by Bruce White. Before 1909, the president's office was located in the Executive Mansion. During the William H. Taft administration, the West Wing doubled in size from the 1902 renovation and included a presidential oval office. In 1934, during the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration, the West Wing was expanded and renovated, with the Oval Office relocated to the West Wing’s southeast corner.
  • President Nixon Calls Apollo 11 Astronauts
    Oliver F. Atkins
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    astronauts
    In this photograph by Oliver F. Atkins, President Richard M. Nixon speaks to Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin. The phone call was live on national television as the two astronauts were on the moon and President was in the Oval Office. The phone call was called "the longest-distance phone call ever".
  • President Johnson Gives a Magnolia Blossom to Peggy Fleming
    Yoichi R. Okamoto
    sports
    White House Guests
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    flowers
    In this photograph, taken by Yoichi R. Okamoto on March 27, 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson pins a saucer magnolia flower to the lapel of figure skating champion Peggy Fleming in the Oval Office. Johnson plucked the blossom for Fleming from a saucer magnolia tree in the Rose Garden. The 19-year-old figure skater earned a gold medal in the ladies' singles competition at the 1968 Winter Olympic Games in Grenoble, France. President Johnson invited Fleming and her mother Doris to the Oval Office, where he presented the Olympic champion with a gold bangle and pinned the magnolia blossom to her lapel. Later in her career, Fleming headed a figure skating group that performed for President Jimmy Carter during a Christmas party for White House staff on December 22, 1980.
  • President Reagan Throws a Football in the Oval Office
    Mary Anne Fackelman
    sports
    Oval Office
    West Wing
    In this photograph, taken by Mary Anne Fackelman on March 26, 1982, President Ronald Reagan playfully prepares to toss a football in the Oval Office. The football was from the University of Southern California Trojans football team. Reagan did not attend USC, but played football in college and retained a lifelong interest in the sport. Reagan played offensive and defensive right guard on the Eureka College football team in Illinois from 1929-1931.
  • President Bush Addresses the Nation on September 11, 2001
    Paul Morse
    speeches
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    September 11
    counterterrorism
    This photograph, taken by Paul Morse, shows President George W. Bush delivering an address to the nation from the Oval Office following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. Bush delivered the live televised address that evening. Contributors to the speech included President Bush; speechwriters John McConnell, David Frum, Matthew Scully, and Michael J. Gerson; national security advisor Condoleezza Rice and her deputy assistant Stephen J. Hadley; and members of the White House communications team. In his remarks, Bush mourned the loss of American citizens yet asserted the strength of the nation, promised retribution for the perpetrators of the attacks and their supporters, and offered words of prayer.
  • Evacuation of Executive Office Staff, September 11, 2001
    Unknown
    staff
    Washington, D.C.
    September 11
    Eisenhower Executive Office Building
    This photograph was taken during the evacuation of executive office staff following the terrorist attacks on the morning of September 11, 2001. The evacuation notice applied to approximately 1,800 staff members who worked in the East and West Wings of the White House, the Old Executive Office Building (later rededicated as the Eisenhower Executive Office Building), the New Executive Office Building, and the Winder Building. Here, fleeing staffers can be seen among the traffic and tourists outside the Old Executive Office Building at the corner of Pennsylvania Avenue and 17th Street.
  • Vice President Quayle at his Surprise Birthday Party
    Unknown
    celebrations
    Eisenhower Executive Office Building
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph was taken on February 6, 1989 during a surprise party for Vice President Dan Quayle. The party was held in a reception room outside the vice president's ceremonial office in the Old Executive Office Building. While the Office of the Vice President is primarily based in the Old Executive Office Building (later renamed the Eisenhower Executive Office Building), vice presidents also work from offices in the West Wing of the White House, the United States Capitol Building, and their official residence at the United States Naval Observatory.
  • President Bush Participates in a Hanukkah Celebration
    Unknown
    winter holidays
    menorahs
    Hanukkah
    Eisenhower Executive Office Building
    Washington, D.C.
    In this photograph, taken on December 21, 1989, President George H. W. Bush, Vice President Dan Quayle, and Second Lady Marilyn T. Quayle participate in a Hanukkah celebration in the Old Executive Office Building. During the ceremony, religious leaders from the Synagogue Council of America presented President Bush with a menorah that was later displayed at the White House. This was the first time a menorah was displayed at the White House. Located west of the White House, the Old Executive Office Building was formerly called the State, War, and Navy Building and later renamed the Eisenhower Executive Office Building after President Dwight D. Eisenhower.
  • President Kennedy at the Resolute Desk
    Cecil Stoughton
    furniture
    West Wing
    Resolute Desk
    Oval Office
    case goods
    In this photograph taken circa 1962, President John F. Kennedy sits at the Resolute Desk in the Oval Office. The desk was made from the oak timbers of the British ship H.M.S. Resolute and sent as a gift to President Rutherford B. Hayes from Queen Victoria in 1880. For her first redecoration of the Oval Office in early 1961, First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy and interior designer Sister Parish had the desk relocated from the Ground Floor to a place of prominence in the Oval Office.
  • Oval Office Looking Towards the Fireplace, Kennedy Administration
    Cecil Stoughton
    refurbishment
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    textiles
    This photograph of the seating area next to the fireplace in the Oval Office shows the newly installed carpet that had been selected by President John F. Kennedy and French interior designer Stéphane Boudin. Cecil Stoughton photographed the office on November 23, 1963, the day after President Kennedy's assassination. Although the restoration of the White House is most closely associated with First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, President Kennedy himself guided the choices for the redecoration of the Oval Office. Tragically, he never saw the completed room, as the curtains and carpet were being installed while he was in Dallas in November 1963.
  • Oval Office, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Cecil Stoughton
    refurbishment
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    textiles
    This photograph of the Oval Office with recently-installed new carpet and drapes was taken by Cecil Stoughton on November 23, 1963, the day after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. President Kennedy and French interior designer Stéphane Boudin selected the carpet and drapes. Although the restoration of the White House is most closely associated with First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, President Kennedy himself guided the choices for the redecoration of the Oval Office. Tragically, he never saw the completed room, as the curtains and carpet were being installed while he was in Dallas in November 1963.
  • Oval Office, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Cecil Stoughton
    refurbishment
    furniture
    case goods
    West Wing
    Resolute Desk
    Oval Office
    textiles
    This photograph of the Oval Office with recently-installed new carpet and drapes was taken by Cecil Stoughton on November 23, 1963, the day after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. President Kennedy and French interior designer Stéphane Boudin selected the carpet and drapes. Although the restoration of the White House is most closely associated with First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, President Kennedy himself guided the choices for the redecoration of the Oval Office. Tragically, he never saw the completed room, as the curtains and carpet were being installed while he was in Dallas in November 1963.
  • Oval Office, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    refurbishment
    This photograph of the Oval Office after it was redecorated by interior decorator and socialite Sister Parish was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on August 14, 1961, during the John F. Kennedy administration. Parish created a nautical theme for the Oval Office by using both recently acquired and loaned seascapes as well as ship models from President Kennedy’s personal collection. Before 1909, the president's office was located in the Executive Mansion. During the William H. Taft administration, the West Wing doubled in size from the 1902 renovation and included a presidential oval office. In 1934, during the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration, the West Wing was expanded and renovated, with the Oval Office relocated to the West Wing’s southeast corner.
  • Oval Office, John F. Kennedy Administration
    Robert L. Knudsen
    refurbishment
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    Resolute Desk
    furniture
    case goods
    This photograph of the Oval Office after it was redecorated by interior decorator and socialite Sister Parish was taken by Robert L. Knudsen on August 14, 1961, during the John F. Kennedy administration. Parish utilized green draperies and carpet that were installed in 1947. The centerpiece of the room, the carved oak Resolute Desk, was presented to President Rutherford B. Hayes by Queen Victoria in 1880. Before 1909, the president's office was located in the Executive Mansion. During the William H. Taft administration, the West Wing doubled in size from the 1902 renovation and included a presidential oval office. In 1934, during the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration, the West Wing was expanded and renovated, with the Oval Office relocated to the West Wing’s southeast corner.
  • President Kennedy and Vice President Johnson with Wilma Rudolph
    Abbie Rowe
    Oval Office
    sports
    West Wing
    White House Guests
    This photograph, taken by Abbie Rowe on April 14, 1961, shows President John F. Kennedy meeting with American athlete Wilma Rudolph in the Oval Office. Rudolph was a triple Olympic gold medalist in track and field during the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome. She was considered the fastest woman in the world, and at the time of this photograph, was also a student at Tennessee State College in Nashville. Pictured in this photograph from left to right: President Kennedy; Rudolph; Rudolph’s mother Blanche Rudolph; Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson; Robert Logan (standing), a friend of Rudolph's; and Edward Temple, coach of the 1960 women’s Olympic track team.
  • President Reagan Greets Ray Mercer
    Bill Fitz-Patrick
    sports
    White House Guests
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    receptions
    In this photograph, President Ronald Reagan greets Olympic champion boxer Ray Mercer in the Oval Office. Mercer, along with his teammates from the 1988 U.S. Summer Olympics team, visited the White House on October 24, 1988, following the games held in Seoul, South Korea. Mercer won the gold medal in heavyweight boxing.
  • President Reagan and Florence Griffith Joyner
    Bill Fitz-Patrick
    sports
    White House Guests
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    receptions
    In this photograph, President Ronald Reagan greets track and field star Florence Griffith Joyner in the Oval Office. Joyner, along with her teammates from the 1988 U.S. Summer Olympics team, visited the White House on October 24, 1988, following the games held in Seoul, South Korea. Joyner won three gold medals at the games, including the 100 meter and 200 meter sprints.
  • President Obama Welcomes 2012 Women’s Gymnastics Team to the Oval Office
    Pete Souza
    sports
    White House Guests
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    receptions
    In this photograph, taken by Pete Souza, President Barack Obama welcomes members of the 2012 U.S. Olympic gymnastics teams to the Oval Office. President Obama welcomed the team members on November 15, 2012. From left to right: Steven Gluckstein, Savannah Vinsant, Aly Raisman, Gabby Douglas, Steve Penny, McKayla Maroney, Kyla Ross, and Jordyn Wieber.
  • President Ford Receives Final Report of the President's Commission on Olympic Sports
    Bill Fitz-Patrick
    sports
    Oval Office
    West Wing
    In this photograph, taken by Bill Fitz-Patrick on January 4, 1977, President Gerald R. Ford receives the final report of the President's Commission on Olympic Sports (PCOS) in the Oval Office. President Ford created the commission in response to continuing conflicts among U.S. amateur sports organizations and declining performance by the U.S. in the Olympic games and other international competitions. Pictured with the president in this photograph are Gerald B. Zornow, PCOS chairman and chairman of the board of the Eastman Kodak Company, and Michael T. Harrigan, executive director of the PCOS.
  • President Obama Poses with Olympic Gymnast McKayla Maroney in the Oval Office
    Pete Souza
    sports
    White House Guests
    Oval Office
    West Wing
    receptions
    In this photograph, taken on November 15, 2012, President Barack Obama jokingly strikes a pose with Olympic gymnast McKayla Maroney while greeting members of the 2012 United States Olympic gymnastics teams in the Oval Office. The president and Olympic medalist imitate Maroney's "not impressed" expression, which had recently gained popularity as an Internet meme. At the 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London, Great Britain, McKayla earned a gold medal for the women's artistic team all-around competition, as well as a silver medal in the women's vault competition. In this photograph, Steve Penny, president of USA Gymnastics, and Olympic trampoline gymnast Savannah Vinsant can be seen laughing at left.
  • Filming of "A Day in the Life of the President," 1971
    Byron E. Schumaker
    sports
    White House Guests
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    press
    In this photograph, taken by Byron E. Schumaker on December 6, 1971, a camera crew records as President Richard M. Nixon meets with guests in the Oval Office for the presentation of the Most Courageous Junior Olympian Award to Gary Washington, a 17-year-old athlete from the Colorado School for the Deaf and Blind High School. Among those in attendance were Senator Gordon Allott of Colorado; Joseph Sisneros, American Sign Language interpreter and athletic coach at the Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind High School; John Kelly, Jr., president of the Amateur Athletic Union of the U.S., Inc. (AAU); Richard W. McArthur, publicity director of the AAU; C.M Sgt. Sidney Brooks, chairman of the 1971 Junior Olympic Championships; and Richard G. Kline, Washington, D.C. attorney and former chairman of the Junior Olympic Championships. This event was filmed for an NBC News television special entitled "A Day in the Life of the President," that aired in January 1972. NBC television crews returned to the White House to document "A Day in the Life of the President" specials for subsequent administrations including presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan.