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  • President Joseph R. Biden, Jr.
    Adam Schultz
    official portrait
    This official photograph of President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. was taken in the Library of the White House on March 3, 2021 by White House photographer Adam Schultz. President Biden served as the senator from Delaware for 36 years as well as vice president to President Barack Obama from 2009-2017. President Biden was elected in 2020 and sworn in as the 46th president of the United States on January 20, 2021.
  • President John F. Kennedy Meets with Civil Rights Leaders
    Warren K. Leffler
    Oval Office
    West Wing
    civil rights
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President John F. Kennedy meeting with civil rights leaders was taken by Warren K. Leffler on August 28, 1963. The leaders met with President Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson after participating in the March for Jobs and Freedom. This photograph shows (left to right): Mathew H. Ahmann, National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice; Whitney M. Young, National Urban League; Martin Luther King, Jr., Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC); John Lewis, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and future congressman for Georgia's 5th District; Rabbi Joachim Prinz, American Jewish Congress; Reverend Eugene Carson Blake, United Presbyterian Church; A. Philip Randolph, AFL-CIO; President John F. Kennedy; Walter Reuther, of the United Auto Workers, with Vice President Johnson partially visible behind him; and Roy Wilkins (NAACP). Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz and Floyd B. McKissick of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) were also present but are not shown.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Johnson Speaks at Voting Rights Act Ceremony
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    U.S. Capitol
    Bill Signing
    civil rights
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering remarks in the Capitol Rotunda prior to the signing ceremony for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 which took place on August 6, 1965. The bill was signed in the President's Room. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • President Lyndon B. Johnson with Civil Rights Leaders in the Oval Office
    Yoichi R. Okamoto
    White House Guests
    West Wing
    Oval Office
    civil rights
    In this photograph, taken in the Oval Office on January 18, 1964 by Yoichi R. Okamoto, President Lyndon B. Johnson meets with a group of civil rights leaders. Among the group are the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (left), Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League (right), and James Farmer of the Congress of Racial Equality (far right).
  • Civil Rights Demonstrators Stage a Sit-in Protest in the Ground Floor Corridor
    Cecil Stoughton
    protest
    Ground Floor Corridor
    Ground Floor
    civil rights
    This black-and-white photograph, taken by Cecil Stougton on March 11, 1965, shows twelve young protesters staging a sit-in demonstration in the Ground Floor Corridor of the White House. The demonstrators were protesting on behalf of civil rights for African Americans, following violence by law enforcement officers on nonviolent demonstrators in Selma, Alabama on March 7, 1965. The protesters entered the White House through the visitor’s entrance as part of regularly scheduled visitor hours from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm. At 4:55pm, President Lyndon B. Johnson summoned Secret Service Agent Rufus Youngblood with instructions to remove the protesters.
  • Civil Rights Demonstrators Stage a Sit-in Protest in the East Garden Room
    Cecil Stoughton
    protest
    East Wing
    East Garden Room
    civil rights
    This black-and-white photograph, taken by Cecil Stougton on March 11, 1965, shows twelve young protesters staging a sit-in demonstration in the East Garden Room. The demonstrators were protesting on behalf of civil rights for African Americans, following violence by law enforcement officers on nonviolent demonstrators in Selma, Alabama on March 7, 1965. The protesters entered the White House through the visitor’s entrance as part of regularly scheduled visitor hours from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm. At 4:55pm, President Lyndon B. Johnson summoned Secret Service Agent Rufus Youngblood with instructions to remove the protesters.
  • Civil Rights Demonstrators Stage a Sit-in Protest in the East Garden Room
    Cecil Stoughton
    protest
    East Wing
    East Garden Room
    civil rights
    This black-and-white photograph, taken by Cecil Stougton on March 11, 1965, shows twelve young protesters staging a sit-in demonstration in the East Garden Room. The demonstrators were protesting on behalf of civil rights for African Americans, following violence by law enforcement officers on nonviolent demonstrators in Selma, Alabama on March 7, 1965. The protesters entered the White House through the visitor’s entrance as part of regularly scheduled visitor hours from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm. At 4:55pm, President Lyndon B. Johnson summoned Secret Service Agent Rufus Youngblood with instructions to remove the protesters.
  • President and Mrs. Reagan Deliver Radio Address at Camp David
    Michael Evans
    travel
    Camp David
    initiatives
    In this photograph, taken by Michael Evans on October 2, 1982, President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan deliver a national radio address on drug abuse and crime during a working vacation to Camp David. During her husband's presidency, Nancy Reagan's main initiative was taking an active role in the War on Drugs, creating the "Just Say No" campaign to educate youth about the dangers of drugs and drug abuse.
  • President Obama and G8 Leaders Watch Champions League Final
    Pete Souza
    sports
    Head of State
    Camp David
    travel
    This photograph, taken by Pete Souza on May 19, 2012, shows President Barack Obama and other world leaders from the G8 Summit including Prime Minister David Cameron of the United Kingdom and German Chancellor Angela Merkel watching the overtime shootout of the 2012 Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) Champions League final in the Laurel Cabin conference room at Camp David. During the soccer match, Chelsea of England narrowly defeated Bayern Munich of Germany during a penalty shootout. President Obama hosted the foreign contingent for the G8 Summit at Camp David from May 18-19, 2012. Among the others pictured in this photograph is José Manuel Durão Barroso, president of the European Commission.
  • President Johnson Listens to Recording from Capt. Charles S. Robb
    Jack E. Kightlinger
    technology
    West Wing
    Cabinet Room
    Vietnam War
    First Family
    In this photograph, taken by Jack E. Kightlinger on July 31, 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson sits in the Cabinet Room listening to a recording sent by his son-in-law Capt. Charles S. Robb, who was deployed on active duty to Vietnam. The president is pictured hunched forward and facing downward, his forehead resting against his hand. On the far side of the room stands a bust depicting Johnson's predecessor, President John F. Kennedy.
  • President Johnson Signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965
    Yoichi R. Okamoto
    signing
    bills
    Washington, D.C.
    U.S. Capitol
    civil rights
    In this photograph, taken by Yoichi R. Okamoto on August 6, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965 in the President's Room of the Capitol building while Civil Rights leaders including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. look on. The Voting Rights Act was designed to the "enforce the 15th amendment" and remove the barriers that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote. The statue's provisions included: banning literacy tests, empowering the attorney general to investigate the unlawful use of poll taxes, and made the act of harassing, intimidating, threatening to prevent a lawfully registered voter from voting punishable by a fine of up $10,000, a five-year prison sentence or both. The legislation also allowed for the appointment of federal examiners with the ability to register qualified citizens to vote in jurisdictions where less than 50 percent of the voting age population was registered to vote. This legislation had a tremendous and immediate impact with over a quarter-million African Americans registered to vote by the end of 1965.
  • Johnson Family Christmas Portrait
    Frank Wolfe
    Yellow Oval Room
    winter holidays
    Christmas
    Second Floor
    pets
    First Family
    In this photograph, taken by Frank Wolfe on December 24, 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson poses with his growing family for a holiday portrait in the Yellow Oval Room. Seated from left: first daughter Luci Baines Johnson Nugent with her son Patrick Lyndon Nugent on her lap; First Lady Lady Bird Johnson; President Johnson with dog Yuki; and first daughter Lynda Bird Johnson Robb cradling infant daughter Lucinda Robb. The family's private Christmas tree is visible in the background. On the wall are paintings "The Forest" (left) and "House on the Marne" (right) by Post-Impressionist painter Paul Cézanne.
  • Jill Biden
    Cheriss May
    official portrait
    This portrait photograph of First Lady Dr. Jill Biden was taken by White House photographer Cheriss May in 2021, during President Joseph R. Biden, Jr.’s first months in office. Dr. Biden previously served as second lady of the United States from 2009-2017, during the Barack Obama administration. A long time educator, Dr. Biden earned a Master of Education from West Chester University, a Master of Arts in english from Villanova University, and a Doctor of Education in educational leadership from the University of Delaware.
  • Presidential Motorcade on Inauguration Day 2021
    Jerry Glaser
    transportation
    motorcades
    inaugurations
    Secret Service
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph depicts the motorcade of President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. with U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers and agents providing security in support of the 59th Presidential Inauguration in Washington D.C, on January 20, 2021. President Biden took his Oath of Office to become the 46th President of the United States earlier in the day.
  • U.S. Marine Corp Passes by Inaugural Reviewing Stand
    Dominique A. Pineiro
    military
    inaugurations
    Washington, D.C.
    This photograph depicts members of the U.S. Marine Corps passing by the inaugural reviewing stand of President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence during the 58th Presidential Inauguration Parade in Washington D.C., on Jan. 20, 2017. More than 5,000 military members from across all branches of the armed forces of the United States, including Reserve and National Guard components, provided ceremonial support during the inaugural festivities.
  • President and Mrs. Trump Walk Down Pennsylvania Avenue
    Kelvin Ringold
    inaugurations
    Secret Service
    Washington, D.C.
    In this photograph, President Donald Trump waves to onlookers as he, First Lady Melania Trump, and their son Barron Trump make their way along Pennsylvania Avenue during the 58th Presidential Inaugural Parade in Washington, D.C., on January 20, 2017. President Trump was officially sworn in as the 45th President of the United States in a ceremony at the Capitol building earlier in the day.
  • The Biden Family Walks to the White House
    Jerry Glaser
    inaugurations
    First Family
    Washington, D.C.
    In this photograph, President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. and First Lady Dr. Jill Biden walk with their family down Pennsylvania Avenue to the White House on January 20, 2021. U.S. Customs and Border Protection Officers and Agents provided security in support of the 59th Presidential Inauguration in the greater Washington, D.C. area. President Biden took his Oath of Office to become the 46th President of the United States earlier in the day, in a scaled-down ceremony and celebration due to the COVID-19 pandemic.