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  • china
    design
    This painting is of an early plate design from 1891 for a new state service shows First Lady Caroline Harrison’s idea for incorporating images of stalks of Indiana corn along the rim of the plate. Aspects of this design inspired the final version of the state service.
  • china
    plate
    This porcelain plate is believed to be a prototype for the Benjamin Harrison state service. It is similar to the selected breakfast plate with the stars for the states and the corn motif on the rim, but both on a fully cobalt blue field. It came from the collection of Col. William H. Crook, a White House employee for fifty years from 1865 to 1915.
  • china service
    bookcase
    Family Dining Room
    These French porcelain service pieces, shown here on display in a bookcase in the White House Family Dining Room, were made by Tressemannes and Vogt of Limoges, France, in 1892. They are part of a state china service that President Benjamin Harrison first ordered for the White House. The service featured a dark blue border, corn and goldenrod decorations, 44 gold stars representing the number of states in the Union when Harrison purchased the china and a design similar to the one found on the Lincoln china, with an eagle standing atop a shield, combining similar elements as the iconography from the Great Seal and the Seal of the President.
  • china service
    maker's mark
    This mark appears on a porcelain service made for the White House by Tressemannes & Vogt of Limoges, France, and ordered from the Washington, D.C. firm of M.W. Beveridge in 1892, during the Benjamin Harrison administration.
  • china service
    glassware service
    plate
    goblet
    These service pieces were part of the glassware and porcelain services that First Lady Caroline Harrison purchased for the White House in 1891. The breakfast and dinner plate both feature a corn and goldenrod border, chosen to represent Mrs. Harrison's native state of Indiana, and were made by Tressemannes and Vogt of Limoges, France. The glassware, including this water goblet, was ordered from C. Dorflinger and Sons of White Mills, Pennsylvania, and featured the popular Russian pattern of the time.
  • china service
    plate
    This porcelain dinner plate was made by Tressemannes & Vogt of Limoges, France, in 1892. The plate was part of a state china service first ordered for the White House during Benjamin Harrison's presidency, and subsequently reordered during the William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt administrations. The service featured a dark blue border with corn and goldenrod decorations, a version of the arms of the United States, and 44 gold stars representing the number of states in the Union when Harrison purchased the china.
  • china service
    cup
    This porcelain after-dinner coffee cup was made by Tressemannes & Vogt of Limoges, France, in 1892. The cup was part of a state china service first ordered for the White House during Benjamin Harrison's presidency, and subsequently reordered during the William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt administrations. The service featured a dark blue border, corn and goldenrod decorations, gold stars to represent the states and a design similar to the one found on the Lincoln china, with an eagle standing atop a shield, combining similar elements as the iconography from the Great Seal and the Seal of the President.
  • china service
    plate
    This porcelain breakfast plate was made by Tressemannes & Vogt of Limoges, France, in 1892. The plate was part of a state china service first ordered for the White House during Benjamin Harrison's presidency, and subsequently reordered during the William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt administrations. The service featured a dark blue border, corn and goldenrod decorations, a design inspired by the Great Seal of the United States, and 44 gold stars representing the number of states in the Union when Harrison purchased the china.
  • china service
    maker's mark
    This mark appears on the reverse side of a dinner plate decorated by Tressemannes & Vogt of Limoges, France for the Dulin & Martin Company of Washington, D.C. The dinner plate features the Benjamin Harrison state service pattern, and was likely part of a reorder of the Harrison china in 1908, during Theodore Roosevelt's administration.