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  • Benjamin Franklin
    portrait
    This portrait of Benjamin Franklin by artist Benjamin Wilson was displayed in the Roosevelt Room during the John F. Kennedy administration. Wilson's portrait is the earliest of the three portraits of Franklin in the White House Collection. Franklin was a renowned author, inventor and philosopher who was also one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. He also served as the representative of the United States in France during the Revolutionary War. Franklin commissioned the portrait in 1758 while he was in London to argue for the right to tax the Penn family estate. Until the American Revolution, the painting hung in Franklin's Philadelphia home. However, while Franklin was in France, the home was occupied by British troops and one of them took the portrait when they left. It was returned to the United States via President Theodore Roosevelt by Albert Henry, the fourth Earl Grey in 1906, the bicentennial of Franklin's birth. In addition to being a painter, Wilson was an inventor who worked with electricity, much as Franklin did. This may account for the lightning bolt visible in the background of the portrait.
  • George Washington Portrait, In Situ
    Matthew D'Agostino
    State Floor
    East Room
    portrait
    This photograph of Gilbert Stuart's portrait of President George Washington in situ was taken on July 20, 2017 in the East Room of the White House. The portrait was installed in the White House in November 1800. During the War of 1812, First Lady Dolley Madison famously saved the portrait from near-certain demise. Before vacating the premises on August 24, 1814, Mrs. Madison ordered that official papers and the Washington portrait should be saved from British hands. The painting returned to the White House after it was rebuilt in 1817. The portrait has historically resided in the East Room, the largest room in the White House that often serves as a ceremonial space.
  • George Washington Portrait, In Situ
    Matthew D'Agostino
    State Floor
    East Room
    portrait
    This photograph of Gilbert Stuart's portrait of President George Washington in situ was taken on July 20, 2017 in the East Room of the White House. The portrait was installed in the White House in November 1800. During the War of 1812, First Lady Dolley Madison famously saved the portrait from near-certain demise. Before vacating the premises on August 24, 1814, Mrs. Madison ordered that official papers and the Washington portrait should be saved from British hands. The painting returned to the White House after it was rebuilt in 1817. The portrait has historically resided in the East Room, the largest room in the White House that often serves as a ceremonial space.
  • George Washington Portrait, In Situ
    Matthew D'Agostino
    State Floor
    East Room
    portrait
    This photograph of Gilbert Stuart's portrait of President George Washington in situ was taken on July 20, 2017 in the East Room of the White House. The portrait was installed in the White House in November 1800. During the War of 1812, First Lady Dolley Madison famously saved the portrait from near-certain demise. Before vacating the premises on August 24, 1814, Mrs. Madison ordered that official papers and the Washington portrait should be saved from British hands. The painting returned to the White House after it was rebuilt in 1817. The portrait has historically resided in the East Room, the largest room in the White House that often serves as a ceremonial space.
  • George Washington Portrait, In Situ
    Matthew D'Agostino
    State Floor
    East Room
    portrait
    This photograph of Gilbert Stuart's portrait of President George Washington in situ was taken on July 20, 2017 in the East Room of the White House. The portrait was installed in the White House in November 1800. During the War of 1812, First Lady Dolley Madison famously saved the portrait from near-certain demise. Before vacating the premises on August 24, 1814, Mrs. Madison ordered that official papers and the Washington portrait should be saved from British hands. The painting returned to the White House after it was rebuilt in 1817. The portrait has historically resided in the East Room, the largest room in the White House that often serves as a ceremonial space.
  • Martha Washington Portrait, In Situ
    Matthew D'Agostino
    portrait
    State Floor
    East Room
    This photograph of Eliphalet Frazer Andrew's portrait of First Lady Martha Washington in situ was taken on July 20, 2017. The portrait has historically resided in the East Room as a companion to the portrait of Mrs. Washington's husband, President George Washington. His portrait by Gilbert Stuart was made famous by First Lady Dolley Madison's rescue during the burning of the White House in 1814. The East Room is the largest room in the White House and often serves as a ceremonial space.
  • Jackson Portrait in Situ, Lincoln Bedroom
    Bates Littlehales
    portrait
    This photograph by Bates Littlehales shows a portrait of President Andrew Jackson hanging in the Lincoln Bedroom in April 1962, during the John F. Kennedy administration. The portrait of Jackson was painted by Miner Kilbourne Kellogg circa 1840. Kellogg also painted portraits of presidents James K. Polk and Martin Van Buren. The two chairs were also likely used by President Lincoln in this room, then known as the Cabinet Room.
  • Jackson Portrait in Situ, Lincoln Bedroom
    Bates Littlehales
    portrait
    This photograph by Bates Littlehales shows a portrait of President Andrew Jackson hanging in the Lincoln Bedroom in April 1962, during the John F. Kennedy administration. The portrait of Jackson was painted by Miner Kilbourne Kellogg circa 1840. Kellogg also painted portraits of presidents James K. Polk and Martin Van Buren. The two chairs were also likely used by President Lincoln in this room, then known as the Cabinet Room.
  • George Washington
    Gilbert Stuart
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of President George Washington was painted by Gilbert Stuart around 1805, six years after the President’s death. This item was a gift of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Payson in memory of Pvt. Daniel Carroll Payson. Washington served as the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolution. He served as president from April 30, 1789 until March 4, 1797. The portrait was displayed in the Cabinet Room during the John F. Kennedy administration. Bates Littlehales photographed the portrait in May 1962 in the frame that housed the portrait at the time.
  • Jackson Portrait in Situ, Lincoln Bedroom
    Bates Littlehales
    portrait
    This photograph by Bates Littlehales shows a portrait of President Andrew Jackson hanging in the Lincoln Bedroom in April 1962, during the John F. Kennedy administration. The portrait of Jackson was painted by Miner Kilbourne Kellogg circa 1840. Kellogg also painted portraits of presidents James K. Polk and Martin Van Buren. The two chairs were also likely used by President Lincoln in this room, then known as the Cabinet Room.
  • George Washington
    Gilbert Stuart
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of President George Washington was painted by Gilbert Stuart around 1805, six years after the President’s death. This item was a gift of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Payson in memory of Pvt. Daniel Carroll Payson. Washington served as the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolution. He served as president from April 30, 1789 until March 4, 1797. The portrait was displayed in the Cabinet Room during the John F. Kennedy administration. Bates Littlehales photographed the portrait in May 1962 in the frame that housed the portrait at the time.
  • Jackson Portrait in Situ, Lincoln Bedroom
    Bates Littlehales
    portrait
    This photograph by Bates Littlehales shows a portrait of President Andrew Jackson hanging in the Lincoln Bedroom in April 1962, during the John F. Kennedy administration. The portrait of Jackson was painted by Miner Kilbourne Kellogg circa 1840. Kellogg also painted portraits of presidents James K. Polk and Martin Van Buren. The two chairs were also likely used by President Lincoln in this room, then known as the Cabinet Room.
  • George Washington
    Gilbert Stuart
    portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of President George Washington was painted by Gilbert Stuart around 1805, six years after the President’s death. This item was a gift of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Payson in memory of Pvt. Daniel Carroll Payson. Washington served as the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolution. He served as president from April 30, 1789 until March 4, 1797. The portrait was displayed in the Cabinet Room during the John F. Kennedy administration. Bates Littlehales photographed the portrait in May 1962 in the frame that housed the portrait at the time.
  • Alexander Hamilton
    John Trumbull
    portrait
    Cabinet
    This portrait of Alexander Hamilton, the first secretary of treasury, was painted by John Trumbull and was completed circa 1805. Trumbull, who had served as personal aide to Gen. George Washington during the Revolutionary War, painted numerous portraits which are in the White House Collection. Four of his paintings adorn the walls of the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C. Hamilton was an influential figure in the early years of the United States and died following a famous duel with Vice President Aaron Burr. This portrait was photographed by Bates Littlehales in 1962 and captures the frame that housed the painting around the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Alexander Hamilton
    John Trumbull
    portrait
    Cabinet
    This portrait of Alexander Hamilton, the first secretary of treasury, was painted by John Trumbull and was completed circa 1805. Trumbull, who had served as personal aide to Gen. George Washington during the Revolutionary War, painted numerous portraits which are in the White House Collection. Four of his paintings adorn the walls of the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C. Hamilton was an influential figure in the early years of the United States and died following a famous duel with Vice President Aaron Burr. This portrait was photographed by Bates Littlehales in 1962 and captures the frame that housed the painting around the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Alexander Hamilton
    John Trumbull
    portrait
    Cabinet
    This portrait of Alexander Hamilton, the first secretary of treasury, was painted by John Trumbull and was completed circa 1805. Trumbull, who had served as personal aide to Gen. George Washington during the Revolutionary War, painted numerous portraits which are in the White House Collection. Four of his paintings adorn the walls of the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C. Hamilton was an influential figure in the early years of the United States and died following a famous duel with Vice President Aaron Burr. This portrait was photographed by Bates Littlehales in 1962 and captures the frame that housed the painting around the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Alexander Hamilton
    John Trumbull
    portrait
    Cabinet
    This portrait of Alexander Hamilton, the first secretary of treasury, was painted by John Trumbull and was completed circa 1805. Trumbull, who had served as personal aide to Gen. George Washington during the Revolutionary War, painted numerous portraits which are in the White House Collection. Four of his paintings adorn the walls of the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C. Hamilton was an influential figure in the early years of the United States and died following a famous duel with Vice President Aaron Burr. This portrait was photographed by Bates Littlehales in 1962 and captures the frame that housed the painting around the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Sarah York Jackson
    Mayna Treanor Avent
    portrait
    This portrait is of Sarah York Jackson, the wife of President Andrew Jackson's adopted son. Mrs. Jackson assisted Emily Tennessee Donelson, niece of President Jackson and his deceased wife Rachel Jackson, with her duties as White House hostess. Bates Littlehales photographed this portrait in May 1962 in the frame that housed the portrait around the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Sarah York Jackson
    Mayna Treanor Avent
    portrait
    This portrait is of Sarah York Jackson, the wife of President Andrew Jackson's adopted son. Mrs. Jackson assisted Emily Tennessee Donelson, niece of President Jackson and his deceased wife Rachel Jackson, with her duties as White House hostess. Bates Littlehales photographed this portrait in May 1962 in the frame that housed the portrait around the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Sarah York Jackson
    Mayna Treanor Avent
    portrait
    This portrait is of Sarah York Jackson, the wife of President Andrew Jackson's adopted son. Mrs. Jackson assisted Emily Tennessee Donelson, niece of President Jackson and his deceased wife Rachel Jackson, with her duties as White House hostess. Bates Littlehales photographed this portrait in May 1962 in the frame that housed the portrait around the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • Brass Pull, Family Dining Room Sideboard
    Unknown
    portrait
    This is an original brass pull from the sideboard in the Family Dining Room. The face of the pull has a profile portrait of President George Washington and the inscription "General Washington." The Family Dining Room is located on the State Floor of the White House. The brass pull was photographed by Bates Littlehales in April 1962.
  • Donald Trump
    Shealah Craighead
    portrait
    This photograph is the official portrait of President Donald Trump. Trump, a former real estate magnate and reality television personality, was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States on January 20, 2017.
  • Steinway Piano in the Entrance Hall
    Matthew D'Agostino
    Entrance Hall
    State Floor
    piano
    portrait
    This photograph of the Steinway piano in the Entrance Hall was taken on July 27, 2016, during the Barack Obama administration. The mahogany concert grand piano with supporting eagles of gold leaf was presented to the White House by Steinway & Sons on December 10, 1938. The piano was designed by architect Eric Gugler who was also responsible for the 1934 expansion of the West Wing. On the wall behind the piano is the official portrait of President Bill Clinton by Simmie Knox. The Entrance Hall is located on the State Floor of the White House.
  • Steinway Piano in the Entrance Hall
    Matthew D'Agostino
    Entrance Hall
    State Floor
    piano
    portrait
    This photograph of the Steinway piano in the Entrance Hall was taken on July 27, 2016, during the Barack Obama administration. The mahogany concert grand piano with supporting eagles of gold leaf was presented to the White House by Steinway & Sons on December 10, 1938. The piano was designed by architect Eric Gugler who was also responsible for the 1934 expansion of the West Wing. On the wall behind the piano is the official portrait of President Bill Clinton by Simmie Knox. The Entrance Hall is located on the State Floor of the White House.
  • Steinway Piano in the Entrance Hall
    Matthew D'Agostino
    Entrance Hall
    State Floor
    piano
    portrait
    This photograph of the Steinway piano in the Entrance Hall was taken on July 27, 2016, during the Barack Obama administration. The mahogany concert grand piano with supporting eagles of gold leaf was presented to the White House by Steinway & Sons on December 10, 1938. The piano was designed by architect Eric Gugler who was also responsible for the 1934 expansion of the West Wing. On the wall behind the piano is the official portrait of President Bill Clinton by Simmie Knox. The Entrance Hall is located on the State Floor of the White House.