Are you sure you want to delete this item? Are you sure you want to delete these 0 items?

Download

Oops! Something went wrong! It doesn't appear to have affected your data. Please notify your system administrator if the problem persists. Access denied
Your session was expired. Page will be reloaded.

Processing...

Your assets are ready. If the download does not start automatically, click Download.

Add assets to album

  • portrait
    This is a photograph of future president Benjamin Harrison in 1854 at the age of 21. He had married his wife, Caroline Lavinia Scott, a year before this photograph was taken. After a short stay in Cincinnati, the couple moved to Indianapolis, Indiana where Harrison continued his practice of law. By 1855 he had entered into a partnership with William Wallace to open their own law practice.
  • portrait
    This photograph is of First Lady Caroline Scott Harrison with her grandson Benjamin Harrison McKee, known fondly as "Baby McKee." She was married to President Benjamin Harrison and served as first lady until her death in 1892. In this photograph, the two are located on the South Portico of the White House.
  • portrait
    This is a photograph of First Lady Caroline Scott Harrison. During her time in the White House, Mrs. Harrison started a catalog of the historic china services of the White House. Mrs. Harrison was influential in the establishment of the White House China collection, showcased in the China Room of the White House. This photograph was taken at Gardner's Gallery in Washington, D.C. during the remaining years of her life, while she was still first lady.
  • portrait
    This black and white photograph from June 5, 1933 features First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. Mrs. Roosevelt was known as "Our Flying First Lady" for her embrace of air travel at a time when many Americans were leery of the still relatively new transportation method. She is pictured standing outside an American Airways airplane en route from Dallas, Texas to Los Angeles, California.
  • portrait
    This miniature portrait of future president James Madison was painted by Charles Willson Peale. Madison was an accomplished legislator when he entered his presidency: he had previously served in the Virginia House of Delegates, the Second Continental Congress, and the House of Representatives. He played a pivotal role during his time in the House, drafting of the Bill of Rights, and later served as Thomas Jefferson's secretary of state. He was the first president to have previously served in Congress. Peale was a soldier and inventor and created many portraits of Revolutionary War era figures. He has pieces, including a portrait of George Washington, in the White House Collection as do his younger brother, James, and his son, Rembrandt.
  • portrait
    This is a portrait of future first lady Caroline Scott Harrison when she was 33 years old. As first lady, Caroline Harrison oversaw the installation of electricity in the White House. She also helped make china painting popular during that time. Harrison held china painting classes taught by her friend, and artist, Paul Putzki that were open to anyone who wanted to learn the art. Harrison's love of art started from a young age and stayed with her throughout her life.
  • portrait
    This is a photograph of President Theodore Roosevelt sitting at his desk in 1904. A former governor of New York, Roosevelt became president upon the assassination of President William McKinley on September 14, 1901 and served until March 4, 1909. President Roosevelt is credited with officially changing the name of the President's House to what is was popularly and commonly referred to at the time, the White House. Roosevelt's presidential letterhead read "Executive Mansion" before switching later to "The White House," after Roosevelt changed the name.
  • portrait
    This miniature is the earliest known portrait of future president James Monroe. It was painted with watercolor on ivory by French artist Louis Sené while Monroe served as the United States Minister to France. It was made to complement a contemporary miniature of Monroe's wife, Elizabeth.
  • First Family
    portrait
    This photograph is of Harriet Lane, who was the niece and ward of President James Buchanan. After she finished her boarding school education, she began accompanying Buchanan to formal events. When Buchanan was elected president, Lane assumed the role of White House hostess and was popular with the American public. She married Elliot Johnston in 1866. In 1903, Lane donated her private art collection to the National Art Gallery which later became part of the Smithsonian Institution. As a result she was given the nickname "first lady of the National Collection of Fine Arts."
  • portrait
    First Family
    This engraving of First Lady Jane Means Appleton Pierce was completed by John Chester Buttre in 1886. As the daughter of a Congregationalist minister, Mrs. Pierce discouraged her husband's political ambitions, fainting at the news he was selected as the Democratic nominee for president. During her husband's years in office from March 4, 1853 to March 4, 1857, Mrs. Pierce had to exert herself to meet the social obligations of a first lady. A devout woman, she suffered heavily from the deaths of all three of her children including her son Benjamin, who was killed in a train accident just prior to his father's inauguration.
  • portrait
    First Family
    This reproduction is of a portrait of First Lady Dolley Payne Todd Madison painted by Bass Otis in the mid-19th century. Dolley Madison served as first lady during her husband's tenure as the fourth president of the United States from 1809 to 1817.
  • portrait
    This daguerreotype of President Andrew Jackson was taken by Mathew Brady. This photograph was taken on April 15, 1845, shortly before Jackson passed away at his home, The Hermitage, near Nashville, Tennessee on June 8, 1845. This is one of four known Jackson daguerreotypes in existence. Jackson served as the 7th president of the United States from March 4, 1829 to March 4, 1837. Prior to his election, he also served in the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate for the state of Tennessee, and was a major general during the War of 1812.
  • portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of William Henry Harrison was completed by an unknown artist circa 1840 after work by artist Abel Nichols. Lightly inscribed in the lower left is the name "R.E. Earl." Harrison, known for his military service in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, came out of retirement in 1840 to win the presidential election and become the 9th president of the United States. After serving only 32 days, however, Harrison became the first president to die in office. His term remains the shortest presidential tenure to date. His grandson, Benjamin Harrison, would be elected in 1889 as the 23rd president.
  • portrait
    silhouette
    This cut paper silhouette portrait of President John Tyler was completed by Auguste Edouart in 1841. The writing at the bottom of the portrait reads, "John Tyler 'President of the United States' Washington 20th April 1841." President Tyler became the tenth president of the United States after President William Henry Harrison died just one month after his inauguration. Tyler served for the remainder of Harrison's term, until March 4, 1845. Tyler had previously served in the United States House of Representatives, the United States Senate, and as governor of Virginia before becoming Harrison's Vice President. Silhouette portraits were popular and readily available throughout Europe and the United States during the 19th century.
  • portrait
    First Family
    This undated daguerreotype is of First Lady Abigail Powers Fillmore. Her husband, President Millard Fillmore, served as vice president under President Zachary Taylor until Taylor's sudden death while in office in 1850. Fillmore served as the thirteenth president from July 10, 1850 until March 4, 1853. Mrs. Fillmore was the first First Lady who continued to hold a job after marriage, as a teacher. Mrs. Fillmore highly valued education throughout her life. As first lady, she delegated many of her social duties to her daughter Mary due to chronic poor health. She also promoted the creation of a White House library, located in what is now the Yellow Oval Room on the Second Floor residence of the Executive Mansion.
  • portrait
    This engraving of President John Tyler was created by Archibald L. Dick and taken from a daguerreotype miniature that was produced by Augustus Morand. President Tyler became the tenth president of the United States after President William Henry Harrison died just one month after his inauguration. Tyler served for the remainder of Harrison's term, until March 4, 1845. Tyler had previously served in the United States House of Representatives, the United States Senate and as governor of Virginia before becoming Harrison's Vice President. This engraving was originally published in the "United States Magazine and Democratic Review" in 1842.
  • portrait
    silhouette
    This ink silhouette on paper of First Lady Abigail Adams by an unknown artist was completed circa 1810. Inscribed on the lower right is "Mrs. Adams." Abigail Adams was first lady when her husband John Adams served as president of the United States from 1797 to 1801. Their family was the first to live in the White House, which was ready for occupancy in 1800, toward the end of his term in office.
  • portrait
    This 1848 engraving by John Sartain depicts President Zachary Taylor in his full major general uniform, standing next to his horse Old Whitey. Prior to being elected president, President Taylor served in the United States Army. Taylor fought in the War of 1812, the Black Hawk War, and the Second Seminole War. His reputation as a war hero during the Mexican-American War helped propel him to the presidency. The engraving was completed based on an original daguerreotype portrait, according to reports.
  • portrait
    First Family
    This portrait of Dolley Madison, titled "Mrs. James Madison," is from a series of tobacco cards produced by the Consolidated Cigar Company between 1889 and 1893. First Lady Dolley Madison was a popular White House hostess while her husband, President James Madison, served as the fourth president of the United States from 1809 to 1817.
  • portrait
    pets
    This lithograph by A. Ducôte is from a drawing by French illustrator Auguste Hervieu of President Andrew Jackson on horseback from 1829. President Jackson bred horses at his home near Nashville, Tennessee, The Hermitage, and kept a racing stable at the White House. Jackson had horses named Bolivia, Lady Nashville, Emilie, and Busiris.
  • portrait
    This portrait of President Zachary Taylor was painted by an unknown artist around 1847, just prior to his presidency. It depicts President Taylor wearing his military uniform. Taylor fought in the War of 1812, the Black Hawk War, and the Second Seminole War. His reputation as a war hero during the Mexican-American War helped propel him to the presidency.
  • engraving
    portrait
    This engraving by John Chester Buttre is of President James Buchanan. This image was influenced from a daguerreotype by Mathew Brady. Buttre completed the engraving in the mid-19th century. Before being elected as the fifteenth president of the United States, Buchanan served as a member of the United States House of Representatives and Senate for the state of Pennsylvania, secretary of state, and the United States minister to Russia and Great Britain.
  • portrait
    This 1879 oil on canvas portrait of President Andrew Jackson was completed 42 years after his presidency by Eliphalet Frazer Andrews from an original 1845 portrait by Thomas Sully. Jackson, the 7th president, was president from March 4, 1829 until March 4, 1837. Prior to his election, President Jackson served in the United States House of Representatives and United States Senate for the state of Tennessee and was a major general during the War of 1812.
  • portrait
    This oil on canvas portrait of President William Henry Harrison was completed by Eliphalet Frazer Andrews in 1879 after James Henry Beard's 1840 portrait. Prior to his presidential election, Harrison was an officer in the United States Army, serving during the Battle of Tippecanoe and the War of 1812. The plate on the bottom of the frame states: "William Henry Harrison 9th president born: Virginia March 4, 1841-April 4, 1841." Harrison died barely a month into his term. His grandson, Benjamin Harrison, served as the 23rd president 1889-1893.
  • portrait
    First Family
    This engraving is of First Lady Abigail Adams and was copyrighted by the Bureau of National Literature and Art in 1903. The engraving displays Mrs. Adams in a dress and bonnet facing right. She was first lady while her husband John Adams served as president of the United States from 1797 to 1801. Their family was the first to live in the White House, which was ready for occupancy in 1800, toward the end of his term in office.