Are you sure you want to delete this item? Are you sure you want to delete these 0 items?

Download

Oops! Something went wrong! It doesn't appear to have affected your data. Please notify your system administrator if the problem persists. Access denied
Your session was expired. Page will be reloaded.

Processing...

Your assets are ready. If the download does not start automatically, click Download.

Add assets to album

  • sideboard
    President's Dining Room
    Second Floor
    This photograph by Bates Littlehales shows a sideboard with silver and a portion of the wallpaper in the President’s Dining Room on the Second Floor of the White House. The wallpaper was created by the French firm Jean Zuber & Co. circa 1852 and depicts the British surrender at Yorktown during the American Revolution. The landscapes in the background are the same landscapes depicted in the earlier Zuber wallpaper hanging in the Diplomatic Reception Room.
  • stamps
    national parks
    This is a one-cent Yosemite National Park stamp, which went on sale July 16, 1934. It was one in series of ten stamps created to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers. The green engraving on the stamp was taken from a photo of Yosemite National Park. On the first day of sale, 250,000 stamps were sold in the park and another 258,000 were sold in Washington D.C. The commemorative series was a part of the celebration of National Park Year.
  • landscape
    stamps
    national parks
    This is an eight-cent stamp featuring a green engraving of the Great White Throne in Zion National Park. The stamp was issued September 18, 1934 and was one in series of ten designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers during National Park Year. The engraving was made from a photograph by George Alexander Grant, the first chief photographer for the National Park Service.
  • landscape
    stamps
    national parks
    This is a six-cent stamp featuring a dark blue engraving of Crater Lake National Park. The park's namesake is a majestic deep blue lake created by volcanic eruption over seven thousand years ago. The stamp was issued September 5, 1934 and was one in series of ten designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers during National Park Year. The engraving was made from a photograph by George Alexander Grant, the first chief photographer for the National Park Service.
  • landscape
    stamps
    national parks
    This is a ten-cent stamp featuring a black engraving of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The stamp was issued October 8, 1934 and was one in series of ten commemorative stamps designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers during National Park Year. The engraving was made from a photograph by Thompson Company, most likely the Thompson Brothers. It was designed by Esther Richards, the first woman to design a U.S. postage stamp.
  • stamps
    national parks
    This is a five-cent stamp featuring a blue engraving of Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park. It was issued on July 30, 1934, one in a series of ten commemorative stamps designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers during National Park Year. Established in 1872, Yellowstone was the world’s first national park and is noted for its wildlife, geysers, hot springs, and waterfalls in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River. The engraving was taken from a photograph by Jack Ellis Haynes, often referred to as J. E. Haynes.
  • stamps
    national parks
    This is a stamp featuring an orange-red engraving of one of the most iconic landmarks in the National Park Service and the United States, the Grand Canyon. It was one in a series of ten stamps created to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, an avid stamp collector, selected the orange-red color for the stamp. The engraving was drawn from a photo taken by National Park Service chief photographer George Grant, the first person to hold that position. The stamp was part of a commemorative series in celebration of National Park Year.
  • landscape
    stamps
    national parks
    This is a seven-cent stamp featuring a black engraving of Acadia National Park. The park boasts the highest mountian on the East Coast, a variety of wildlife, and rocky beaches. The stamp was issued July 30, 1934 and was one in a series of ten commemorative stamps designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers during National Park Year. The engraving was made from a photograph by H. L. Bradley.
  • stamps
    national parks
    This is a four-cent stamp with a brown engraving of Cliff Palace in Mesa Verde National Park. The stamp was issued September 25, 1934, one in a commemorative series of ten designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers during National Park Year. The engraving was made from a photograph by National Park Service chief photographer George Grant, the first person to hold the position.
  • stamps
    national parks
    This is a three-cent stamp with a violet engraving of Mount Rainier National Park with the Mirror Lakes in the foreground. The stamp was issued August 3, 1934 and was one in a commemorative series of ten designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers during National Park Year. Mount Rainer National Park became the fifth national park on March 2, 1889. In addition to its namesake Mount Rainer, a 14,410 ft. volcano, the park boasts reflection lakes, meadows, and glaciers. The engraving was made from a photograph by Asahel Curtis.
  • landscape
    stamps
    national parks
    This is a nine-cent stamp featuring an orange engraving of Two Medicine Lake in Glacier National Park. The stamp was issued August 27, 1934 and was one in series of ten commemorative stamps designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers during National Park Year. The engraving was made from a photograph by George Alexander Grant, the first chief photographer for the National Park Service.
  • This is the die-proof of the 1934 commemorative ten-cent stamp of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The final stamp was issued October 8, 1934 and was one in series of ten designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers. The die-proof is notable for the inscription in the righthand margin by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The President inscribed, "OK" and signed his initials. The engraving was made from a photograph by the Thompson Company, most likely the Thompson Brothers. It was designed by Esther Richards, the first woman to design a U.S. postage stamp.
  • Thanksgiving
    holidays
    In this photograph President Dwight D. Eisenhower feeds a cranberry to a turkey he received from the Turkey Foundation. The presentation occurred in the West Garden, which is now the Rose Garden. Presidents and their families have received turkeys for the holidays since the 1870s. The origin of the turkey pardon is said to have started with President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, after he offered a clemency to a turkey purchased for Christmas dinner at his son's request. However, the reprieve did not become a official ceremony until George H. W. Bush's administration in 1989.
  • landscape
    This landscape was done by Andrew Wyeth. The painting features a large crescent moon positioned next to the planet Jupiter in the evening sky, hovering over the shore. The astronomical features are also reflected in the quiet surface of a lake that fills the lower half of the canvas. Wyeth was lauded as one of the best-known American painters of the mid-20th century. Wyeth's father Newell Convers (N.C.) and sister Henriette also have work in the White House Collection.
  • New York
    This is a lithograph of the Federal Hall of the City of New York. Before the capital was moved to the Federal City of Washington, it operated in New York City. New York was the first United States capital after the ratification of the Constitution. This print was made by Charles Currier, who based it on a drawing by John Joseph Holland.
  • flowers
    painting
    This is a watercolor painting of a flower created by First Lady Caroline Scott Harrison. This piece, along with other drawings and watercolors in her collection, display her talent at depicting flower and nature scenes.
  • painting
    This is a watercolor painting of a bird's nest created by First Lady Caroline Scott Harrison. This piece, along with other drawings and watercolors in her collection, display her talent at depicting flower and nature scenes.
  • china
    plate
    This is a porcelain plate decorated with a painting of a sandpiper and a poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow painted by First Lady Caroline Scott Harrison. The plate was painted while she served as first lady during her husband Benjamin Harrison's administration. This plate is in the collection of the Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site.