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  • Family Dining Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Family Dining Room was taken May 1962. From ca. 1825 to 1962, presidents and their families traditionally dined in the Old Family Dining Room. In 1962 with the addition of a new private family dining room on the second floor of the White House, the room was re-purposed for small official dinners, working lunches, and a staging area for state dinners. Located on the State Floor of the White House, the room features architectural details such as elegant plaster work and vaulted ceilings. During the Obama administration, the room was opened to public tours for the first time.
  • Family Dining Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Family Dining Room was taken May 1962. From ca. 1825 to 1962, presidents and their families traditionally dined in the Old Family Dining Room. In 1962 with the addition of a new private family dining room on the second floor of the White House, the room was re-purposed for small official dinners, working lunches, and a staging area for state dinners. Located on the State Floor of the White House, the room features architectural details such as elegant plaster work and vaulted ceilings. During the Obama administration, the room was opened to public tours for the first time.
  • Family Dining Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Family Dining Room was taken May 1962. From ca. 1825 to 1962, presidents and their families traditionally dined in the Old Family Dining Room. In 1962 with the addition of a new private family dining room on the second floor of the White House, the room was re-purposed for small official dinners, working lunches, and a staging area for state dinners. Located on the State Floor of the White House, the room features architectural details such as elegant plaster work and vaulted ceilings. During the Obama administration, the room was opened to public tours for the first time.
  • Family Dining Room
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Family Dining Room was taken May 1962. From ca. 1825 to 1962, presidents and their families traditionally dined in the Old Family Dining Room. In 1962 with the addition of a new private family dining room on the second floor of the White House, the room was re-purposed for small official dinners, working lunches, and a staging area for state dinners. Located on the State Floor of the White House, the room features architectural details such as elegant plaster work and vaulted ceilings. During the Obama administration, the room was opened to public tours for the first time.
  • wallpaper
    President's Dining Room
    Second Floor
    This photograph by Bates Littlehales shows a portion of the wallpaper in the President’s Dining Room on the Second Floor of the White House during the John F. Kennedy administration. It was created by the French firm Jean Zuber et Cie circa 1852 and depicts the British surrender at Yorktown during the American Revolution. The landscapes in the background are the same landscapes depicted in an earlier Zuber wallpaper hanging in the Diplomatic Reception Room.
  • wallpaper
    President's Dining Room
    Second Floor
    This photograph by Bates Littlehales shows a portion of the wallpaper in the President’s Dining Room on the Second Floor of the White House during the John F. Kennedy administration. It was created by the French firm Jean Zuber et Cie circa 1852 and depicts the British surrender at Yorktown during the American Revolution. The landscapes in the background are the same landscapes depicted in an earlier Zuber wallpaper hanging in the Diplomatic Reception Room.
  • wallpaper
    President's Dining Room
    Second Floor
    This photograph by Bates Littlehales shows a portion of the wallpaper in the President’s Dining Room on the Second Floor of the White House during the John F. Kennedy administration. It was created by the French firm Jean Zuber et Cie circa 1852 and depicts the British surrender at Yorktown during the American Revolution. The landscapes in the background are the same landscapes depicted in an earlier Zuber wallpaper hanging in the Diplomatic Reception Room.
  • wallpaper
    President's Dining Room
    Second Floor
    This photograph by Bates Littlehales shows a portion of the wallpaper in the President’s Dining Room on the Second Floor of the White House during the John F. Kennedy administration. It was created by the French firm Jean Zuber et Cie circa 1852 and depicts the British surrender at Yorktown during the American Revolution. The landscapes in the background are the same landscapes depicted in an earlier Zuber wallpaper hanging in the Diplomatic Reception Room.
  • wallpaper
    President's Dining Room
    Second Floor
    This photograph by Bates Littlehales shows a portion of the wallpaper in the President’s Dining Room on the Second Floor of the White House during the John F. Kennedy administration. It was created by the French firm Jean Zuber et Cie circa 1852 and depicts the British surrender at Yorktown during the American Revolution. The landscapes in the background are the same landscapes depicted in an earlier Zuber wallpaper hanging in the Diplomatic Reception Room.
  • wallpaper
    President's Dining Room
    Second Floor
    This photograph by Bates Littlehales shows a portion of the wallpaper in the President’s Dining Room on the Second Floor of the White House during the John F. Kennedy administration. It was created by the French firm Jean Zuber et Cie circa 1852 and depicts the British surrender at Yorktown during the American Revolution. The landscapes in the background are the same landscapes depicted in an earlier Zuber wallpaper hanging in the Diplomatic Reception Room.
  • sideboard
    President's Dining Room
    Second Floor
    This photograph by Bates Littlehales shows a sideboard with silver and a portion of the wallpaper in the President’s Dining Room on the Second Floor of the White House. The wallpaper was created by the French firm Jean Zuber & Co. circa 1852 and depicts the British surrender at Yorktown during the American Revolution. The landscapes in the background are the same landscapes depicted in the earlier Zuber wallpaper hanging in the Diplomatic Reception Room.
  • Family Dining Room
    State Floor
    This photograph is of the Family Dining Room was taken May 1962. From 1825 to 1962, presidents and their families traditionally dined in the Old Family Dining Room. In 1962 with the addition of a new private family dining room on the second floor of the White House, the room was re-purposed for small official dinners, working lunches, and as a staging area for state dinners. Located on the State Floor of the White House, the room features architectural details such as elegant plaster work and vaulted ceilings. During the Obama administration, the room was opened to public tours for the first time.
  • West Wing
    West Wing Reception Room
    This undated photograph of the Reception Room was taken by Peter Vitale. The Reception Room is located in the West Wing and serves as a waiting room for visitors to the West Wing Offices. The room is furnished with modern-day, Chippendale-style reproductions and an eighteenth-century English bookcase.
  • renovation
    This photograph of the White House water table was taken during the Truman R[r]enovation from 1948 to 1952. It was originally laid under the supervision of stonemason Collen Williamson.
  • renovation
    This photograph by Abbie Rowe was taken during the Truman Renovation of the White House. Between 1948 and 1952, the White House was gutted and the interior was completely reconstructed. The facade remained intact during construction.
  • Ground Floor
    This photograph captures bankers-marks found engraved on the sandstones of the White House walls. Bankers-marks were a stonemason tradition with origins in Scotland and England. The first stonemason hired for White House construction, Collen Williamson, was a Scot who likely continued to enforce this tradition while working on the Executive Mansion. Historically, the marks represented apprentices upon the completion of their training and were derived from the marks of their teachers. The marks on the White House stones were uncovered during President Harry S. Truman's renovation of the Executive Mansion from 1948-1952. President Truman gave a number of the stones to Masonic Lodges across the country while some remained in the White House. Several of these marks were displayed in two reconstructed fireplaces on the Ground Floor.
  • north view
    This photograph by Bruce White shows the basement entrance on the north side of the White House with surviving marks from the burning of the White House in 1814. Situated beneath the raised platform that supports the main entrance, this basement doorway includes Collen Williamson's original flanking rustication around the door and keystone. This design feature was widely popular in the 18th Century.
  • Lincoln Bedroom
    Second Floor
    This photograph shows the Lincoln Bedroom as it appeared in September 1962. Located on the Second Floor of the White House, in modern times the Lincoln Bedroom is used for official and personal guests of the president’s family. In the past, it served as an office and Cabinet room. The room became a bedroom in the family quarters during the 1902 Roosevelt renovation. The high-back bed, known as the Lincoln Bed, was purchased for the White House by First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln. While it was purchased during the Lincoln administration, the bed was probably never used by President Abraham Lincoln, nor was it originally placed in this room. Repurposed during the administration of President Harry S. Truman, the room features furniture, artwork, and refurbishing reminiscent of the 1860s. Under the direction of First Lady Laura Bush, the room underwent refurbishing to enhance its historical accuracy. Aided by the White House Historical Association, this project was complete in 2005.