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  • Johnson Signs First Special Message to Congress
    James P. Blair
    West Wing
    Congress
    Cabinet Room
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting in the Cabinet Room was taken by James P. Blair on April 28, 1966. President Johnson met that day with Civil Rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and members of Congress and his Cabinet to discuss and sign his Special Message to the Congress Proposing Further Legislation To Strengthen Civil Rights. Johnson's Special Message called for the enactment of federal law prohibiting housing discrimination. Johnson would go on to send a Special Message to Congress every year until the April 11, 1968 signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which afforded equal housing opportunities regardless of race, religion, or national origin. From left to right are: Floyd B. McKissick, national director of the Congress of Racial Equality; Dr. King; Rep. Emanuel Celler of New York; President Johnson; Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP; and Civil Rights and union leader A. Philip Randolph.
  • Johnson Signs First Special Message to Congress
    James P. Blair
    West Wing
    Congress
    Cabinet Room
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting in the Cabinet Room was taken by James P. Blair on April 28, 1966. President Johnson met that day with Civil Rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and members of Congress and his Cabinet to discuss and sign his Special Message to the Congress Proposing Further Legislation To Strengthen Civil Rights. Johnson's Special Message called for the enactment of federal law prohibiting housing discrimination. Johnson would go on to send a Special Message to Congress every year until the April 11, 1968 signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which afforded equal housing opportunities regardless of race, religion, or national origin. From left to right are: Attorney General Nicholas deB. Katzenbach; Floyd B. McKissick, national director of the Congress of Racial Equality; Dr. King; Rep. Emanuel Celler of New York; President Johnson; Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP; and Civil Rights and union leader A. Philip Randolph.
  • Johnson Signs First Special Message to Congress
    James P. Blair
    West Wing
    Congress
    Cabinet Room
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting in the Cabinet Room was taken by James P. Blair on April 28, 1966. President Johnson met that day with Civil Rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and members of Congress and his Cabinet to discuss and sign his Special Message to the Congress Proposing Further Legislation To Strengthen Civil Rights. Johnson's Special Message called for the enactment of federal law prohibiting housing discrimination. Johnson would go on to send a Special Message to Congress every year until the April 11, 1968 signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which afforded equal housing opportunities regardless of race, religion, or national origin. From left to right are: Floyd B. McKissick, national director of the Congress of Racial Equality; Dr. King; Rep. Emanuel Celler of New York; President Johnson; Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP; Civil Rights and union leader A. Philip Randolph; and Dorothy Height, president of the National Council of Negro Women.
  • Johnson Signs First Special Message to Congress
    James P. Blair
    West Wing
    Congress
    Cabinet Room
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting in the Cabinet Room was taken by James P. Blair on April 28, 1966. President Johnson met that day with Civil Rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and members of Congress and his Cabinet to discuss and sign his Special Message to the Congress Proposing Further Legislation To Strengthen Civil Rights. Johnson's Special Message called for the enactment of federal law prohibiting housing discrimination. Johnson would go on to send a Special Message to Congress every year until the April 11, 1968 signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which afforded equal housing opportunities regardless of race, religion, or national origin. From left to right are: Attorney General Nicholas deB. Katzenbach; Floyd B. McKissick, national director of the Congress of Racial Equality; Dr. King; Rep. Emanuel Celler of New York; President Johnson; Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP; and Civil Rights and union leader A. Philip Randolph.
  • Johnson Signs First Special Message to Congress
    James P. Blair
    West Wing
    Congress
    Cabinet Room
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting in the Cabinet Room was taken by James P. Blair on April 28, 1966. President Johnson met that day with Civil Rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and members of Congress and his Cabinet to discuss and sign his Special Message to the Congress Proposing Further Legislation To Strengthen Civil Rights. Johnson's Special Message called for the enactment of federal law prohibiting housing discrimination. Johnson would go on to send a Special Message to Congress every year until the April 11, 1968 signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which afforded equal housing opportunities regardless of race, religion, or national origin. From left to right are: Attorney General Nicholas deB. Katzenbach; Floyd B. McKissick, national director of the Congress of Racial Equality; Dr. King; Rep. Emanuel Celler of New York; President Johnson; Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP; and Civil Rights and union leader A. Philip Randolph.
  • Johnson Signs First Special Message to Congress
    James P. Blair
    West Wing
    Congress
    Cabinet Room
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting in the Cabinet Room was taken by James P. Blair on April 28, 1966. President Johnson met that day with Civil Rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and members of Congress and his Cabinet to discuss and sign his Special Message to the Congress Proposing Further Legislation To Strengthen Civil Rights. Johnson's Special Message called for the enactment of federal law prohibiting housing discrimination. Johnson would go on to send a Special Message to Congress every year until the April 11, 1968 signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which afforded equal housing opportunities regardless of race, religion, or national origin. From left to right are: Floyd B. McKissick, national director of the Congress of Racial Equality; Dr. King; Rep. Emanuel Celler of New York; President Johnson; Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP; Civil Rights and union leader A. Philip Randolph; and Dorothy Height, president of the National Council of Negro Women.
  • Johnson Signs First Special Message to Congress
    James P. Blair
    West Wing
    Congress
    Cabinet Room
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting in the Cabinet Room was taken by James P. Blair on April 28, 1966. President Johnson met that day with Civil Rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and members of Congress and his Cabinet to discuss and sign his Special Message to the Congress Proposing Further Legislation To Strengthen Civil Rights. Johnson's Special Message called for the enactment of federal law prohibiting housing discrimination. Johnson would go on to send a Special Message to Congress every year until the April 11, 1968 signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which afforded equal housing opportunities regardless of race, religion, or national origin. Seated from left to right are: Andrew J. Biemiller of the AFL-CIO; Attorney General Nicholas deB. Katzenbach; Floyd B. McKissick, national director of the Congress of Racial Equality; Dr. King; Rep. Emanuel Celler of New York; President Johnson; and Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP.
  • Johnson Signs First Special Message to Congress
    James P. Blair
    West Wing
    Congress
    Cabinet Room
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting in the Cabinet Room was taken by James P. Blair on April 28, 1966. President Johnson met that day with Civil Rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and members of Congress and his Cabinet to discuss and sign his Special Message to the Congress Proposing Further Legislation To Strengthen Civil Rights. Johnson's Special Message called for the enactment of federal law prohibiting housing discrimination. Johnson would go on to send a Special Message to Congress every year until the April 11, 1968 signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which afforded equal housing opportunities regardless of race, religion, or national origin. From left to right are: Dr. King; Rep. Emanuel Celler of New York; President Johnson; Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP; and Civil Rights and union leader A. Philip Randolph.
  • Johnson Signs First Special Message to Congress
    James P. Blair
    West Wing
    Congress
    Cabinet Room
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting in the Cabinet Room was taken by James P. Blair on April 28, 1966. President Johnson met that day with Civil Rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and members of Congress and his Cabinet to discuss and sign his Special Message to the Congress Proposing Further Legislation To Strengthen Civil Rights. Johnson's Special Message called for the enactment of federal law prohibiting housing discrimination. Johnson would go on to send a Special Message to Congress every year until the April 11, 1968 signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which afforded equal housing opportunities regardless of race, religion, or national origin. From left to right are: Dr. King; Rep. Emanuel Celler of New York; President Johnson; Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP; and Civil Rights and union leader A. Philip Randolph.
  • Johnson Signs First Special Message to Congress
    James P. Blair
    West Wing
    Congress
    Cabinet Room
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting in the Cabinet Room was taken by James P. Blair on April 28, 1966. President Johnson met that day with Civil Rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and members of Congress and his Cabinet to discuss and sign his Special Message to the Congress Proposing Further Legislation To Strengthen Civil Rights. Johnson's Special Message called for the enactment of federal law prohibiting housing discrimination. Johnson would go on to send a Special Message to Congress every year until the April 11, 1968 signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which afforded equal housing opportunities regardless of race, religion, or national origin. From left to right are: Dr. King; Rep. Emanuel Celler of New York; President Johnson; Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP; and Civil Rights and union leader A. Philip Randolph.
  • Johnson Signs First Special Message to Congress
    James P. Blair
    West Wing
    Congress
    Cabinet Room
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting in the Cabinet Room was taken by James P. Blair on April 28, 1966. President Johnson met that day with Civil Rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and members of Congress and his Cabinet to discuss and sign his Special Message to the Congress Proposing Further Legislation To Strengthen Civil Rights. Johnson's Special Message called for the enactment of federal law prohibiting housing discrimination. Johnson would go on to send a Special Message to Congress every year until the April 11, 1968 signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which afforded equal housing opportunities regardless of race, religion, or national origin. Seated from left to right are: Floyd B. McKissick, national director of the Congress of Racial Equality; Dr. King; Rep. Emanuel Celler of New York; President Johnson; and Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP.
  • Johnson Signs First Special Message to Congress
    James P. Blair
    West Wing
    Congress
    Cabinet Room
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting in the Cabinet Room was taken by James P. Blair on April 28, 1966. President Johnson met that day with Civil Rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and members of Congress and his Cabinet to discuss and sign his Special Message to the Congress Proposing Further Legislation To Strengthen Civil Rights. Johnson's Special Message called for the enactment of federal law prohibiting housing discrimination. Johnson would go on to send a Special Message to Congress every year until the April 11, 1968 signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which afforded equal housing opportunities regardless of race, religion, or national origin. Seated from left to right are: Andrew J. Biemiller of the AFL-CIO; Attorney General Nicholas deB. Katzenbach; Floyd B. McKissick, national director of the Congress of Racial Equality; Dr. King; Rep. Emanuel Celler of New York; President Johnson; and Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP.
  • Johnson Signs First Special Message to Congress
    James P. Blair
    West Wing
    Congress
    Cabinet Room
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting in the Cabinet Room was taken by James P. Blair on April 28, 1966. President Johnson met that day with Civil Rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and members of Congress and his Cabinet to discuss and sign his Special Message to the Congress Proposing Further Legislation To Strengthen Civil Rights. Johnson's Special Message called for the enactment of federal law prohibiting housing discrimination. Johnson would go on to send a Special Message to Congress every year until the April 11, 1968 signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which afforded equal housing opportunities regardless of race, religion, or national origin. From left to right are: Dr. King; Rep. Emanuel Celler of New York; President Johnson; Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP; and Civil Rights and union leader A. Philip Randolph.
  • Johnson Signs First Special Message to Congress
    James P. Blair
    West Wing
    Congress
    Cabinet Room
    White House Guests
    This photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson meeting in the Cabinet Room was taken by James P. Blair on April 28, 1966. President Johnson met that day with Civil Rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and members of Congress and his Cabinet to discuss and sign his Special Message to the Congress Proposing Further Legislation To Strengthen Civil Rights. Johnson's Special Message called for the enactment of federal law prohibiting housing discrimination. Johnson would go on to send a Special Message to Congress every year until the April 11, 1968 signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which afforded equal housing opportunities regardless of race, religion, or national origin. From left to right are: Attorney General Nicholas deB. Katzenbach; Floyd B. McKissick, national director of the Congress of Racial Equality; Dr. King; Rep. Emanuel Celler of New York; President Johnson; Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP; and Civil Rights and union leader A. Philip Randolph.
  • Announcement of President Johnson's Surgery
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    Cabinet Room
    press
    West Wing
    This photograph is of a press announcement in the Cabinet Room on October 5, 1965. President Lyndon B. Johnson announced that he was to undergo gall bladder surgery at National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 7th.
  • Announcement of President Johnson's Surgery
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    Cabinet Room
    press
    West Wing
    This photograph is of a press announcement in the Cabinet Room on October 5, 1965. President Lyndon B. Johnson announced that he was to undergo gall bladder surgery at National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 7th. White House press secretary Bill Moyers is standing on the left side of the photograph.
  • Press Announcement in the Cabinet Room
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    Cabinet Room
    West Wing
    This photograph is from a press announcement that took place in the Cabinet Room on October 5, 1965. That day, President Lyndon B. Johnson announced that he would have surgery to remove his gall bladder on October 7th at National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. The men in this photo were the doctors who would be taking care of the president during his surgery and handled questions from the press.
  • Press Announcement in the Cabinet Room
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    Cabinet Room
    West Wing
    This photograph is from a press announcement that took place in the Cabinet Room on October 5, 1965. That day, President Lyndon B. Johnson announced that he would have surgery to remove his gall bladder on October 7th at National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. The men in this photo were the doctors who would be taking care of the president during his surgery and handled questions from the press.
  • Announcement of President Johnson's Surgery
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    West Wing
    Cabinet Room
    press
    This photograph is of a press announcement in the Cabinet Room on October 5, 1965. President Lyndon B. Johnson announced that he was to undergo gall bladder surgery at National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 7th. White House press secretary Bill Moyers is standing on the left side of the photograph.
  • President Johnson Delivers a Press Announcement
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    Cabinet Room
    West Wing
    This photograph is of President Lyndon B. Johnson delivering a press announcement in the Cabinet Room on October 5, 1965. President Johnson announced that he was to undergo gall bladder surgery at National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Johnson entered the hospital on the 7th and had the operation the following day.
  • Announcement of President Johnson's Surgery
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    Cabinet Room
    press
    West Wing
    This photograph is of a press announcement in the Cabinet Room on October 5, 1965. President Lyndon B. Johnson announced that he was to undergo gall bladder surgery at National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 7th. White House press secretary Bill Moyers is standing on the left side of the photograph.
  • Announcement of President Johnson's Surgery
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    Cabinet Room
    press
    West Wing
    This photograph is of a press announcement in the Cabinet Room on October 5, 1965. President Lyndon B. Johnson announced that he was to undergo gall bladder surgery at National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 7th. White House press secretary Bill Moyers is standing on the left side of the photograph.
  • Announcement of President Johnson's Surgery
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    Cabinet Room
    press
    West Wing
    This photograph is of a press announcement in the Cabinet Room on October 5, 1965. President Lyndon B. Johnson announced that he was to undergo gall bladder surgery at National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 7th. White House press secretary Bill Moyers is standing on the left side of the photograph.
  • Announcement of President Johnson's Surgery
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    Cabinet Room
    press
    West Wing
    This photograph is of a press announcement in the Cabinet Room on October 5, 1965. President Lyndon B. Johnson announced that he was to undergo gall bladder surgery at National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 7th. White House press secretary Bill Moyers is standing on the left side of the photograph.
  • Announcement of President Johnson's Surgery
    Joseph J. Scherschel
    Cabinet Room
    press
    West Wing
    This photograph is of a press announcement in the Cabinet Room on October 5, 1965. President Lyndon B. Johnson announced that he was to undergo gall bladder surgery at National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 7th. White House press secretary Bill Moyers is pictured standing with his back away from the camera.