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  • Red Room
    State Floor
    mirror
    This convex mirror with an eagle on top, made in the early 19th century, remains a part of the White House furnishings. In this photograph, the mirror is seen hanging in the Red Room and reflects the furnishings and fireplace in the ornate room during the John F. Kennedy administration.
  • State Dining Room
    State Floor
    textile
    This close up photograph of the State Dining Room window treatments was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on July 1, 2015, during the Barack Obama administration. First Lady Michelle Obama oversaw the refurbishment of the State Dining Room, a three year project that was unveiled in 2015. These silk curtains, installed during the refurbishment, are a peacock blue and ecru striped design.
  • State Dining Room
    State Floor
    textile
    This close up photograph of the State Dining Room window treatments was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on July 1, 2015, during the Barack Obama administration. First Lady Michelle Obama oversaw the refurbishment of the State Dining Room, a three year project that was unveiled in 2015. These silk curtains, installed during the refurbishment, are a peacock blue and ecru striped design.
  • State Dining Room
    State Floor
    textile
    This close up of the State Dining Room rug was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on July 1, 2015, during the Barack Obama administration. First Lady Michelle Obama oversaw the refurbishment of the State Dining Room, a three year project that was unveiled in 2015. This custom, woven rug was inspired by the plasterwork on the room's ceiling and features a design with wreathes and oak leaves. The rug was installed in 2012, at the beginning of the refurbishment.
  • State Dining Room
    State Floor
    textile
    This close up of the State Dining Room rug was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on July 1, 2015, during the Barack Obama administration. First Lady Michelle Obama oversaw the refurbishment of the State Dining Room, a three year project that was unveiled in 2015. This custom, woven rug was inspired by the plasterwork on the room's ceiling and features a design with wreathes and oak leaves. The rug was installed in 2012, at the beginning of the refurbishment.
  • State Dining Room
    State Floor
    textile
    This close up of the State Dining Room rug was taken by Matthew D'Agostino on July 1, 2015, during the Barack Obama administration. First Lady Michelle Obama oversaw the refurbishment of the State Dining Room, a three year project that was unveiled in 2015. This custom, woven rug was inspired by the plasterwork on the room's ceiling and features a design with wreathes and oak leaves. The rug was installed in 2012, at the beginning of the refurbishment.
  • flowers
    painting
    This is a watercolor painting of a flower created by First Lady Caroline Scott Harrison. This piece, along with other drawings and watercolors in her collection, display her talent at depicting flower and nature scenes.
  • south grounds
    This painting by Peter Waddell is titled "A Favorable Day: The White House Stables on the Day of Grant's Second Inauguration, 1873." It depicts the fourth and final White House Stable as it was initially built in 1871. Waddell painted this as a part of his "An Artist Visits the White House Past" series, commissioned by the White House Historical Association.
  • drawings & plans
    This drawing of Mr. Aspinwall's Gallery was published by "Harper's Weekly" in 1859. It is likely that W. W. Corcoran hung his paintings in a similar style, one above the other, in his house in the northwest corner of Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C. The house, at H Street and Connecticut Avenue, was located near the White House.
  • portrait
    This portrait of W. W. Corcoran, formally known as William Wilson Corcoran, was completed by Charles Loring Elliot in 1867. Corcoran was a philanthropist, banker, and patron of the arts who made his fortune in America. Corcoran lived in the northwest corner of Lafayette Square, near the White House, at H Street and Connecticut Avenue.
  • portrait
    This engraving of artist Clark Mills is undated. It shows the self-taught sculptor who was commissioned by the Jackson Monument Committee to create the Andrew Jackson equestrian statue in 1848;it was dedicated in 1853 in Lafayette Square. He made his casting in a temporary foundry on the Ellipse. It was the first bronze statue cast in the United States and weighs 15 tons. There, with the help of his enslaved apprentice Phillip Reid, he also cast an equestrian statue of George Washington that stands in Washington Circle on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C.
  • Lincoln Bedroom
    Second Floor
    This photograph shows a plaque embedded in the mantelpiece of the Lincoln Bedroom. It reads, "In this room Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863 whereby four million slaves were given their freedom and slavery was forever prohibited in these United States." The Lincoln Bedroom is located on the Second Floor of the Executive Mansion.
  • Lincoln Bedroom
    Second Floor
    This photograph shows a plaque embedded in the mantelpiece of the Lincoln Bedroom. It reads, "In this room Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863 whereby four million slaves were given their freedom and slavery was forever prohibited in these United States." The Lincoln Bedroom is located on the Second Floor of the Executive Mansion.
  • piano
    Entrance Hall
    State Floor
    This photograph of the Steinway piano in the Entrance Hall of the White House taken by Bruce White on April 6, 2017. The mahogany concert grand piano with supporting eagles of the gold leaf was presented to the White House by Steinway & Sons on December 10, 1938. The piano was designed by architect Eric Gugler who was also responsible for the 1934 expansion of the West Wing.
  • piano
    This photograph is of the Steinway piano President Woodrow Wilson brought with him from the White House at the end of his administration to his new home in Washington, D.C. The piano is part of the collection at the Woodrow Wilson House.
  • sideboard
    President's Dining Room
    Second Floor
    This photograph by Bates Littlehales shows a sideboard with silver and a portion of the wallpaper in the President’s Dining Room on the Second Floor of the White House. The wallpaper was created by the French firm Jean Zuber & Co. circa 1852 and depicts the British surrender at Yorktown during the American Revolution. The landscapes in the background are the same landscapes depicted in the earlier Zuber wallpaper hanging in the Diplomatic Reception Room.
  • stamps
    national parks
    This is a one-cent Yosemite National Park stamp, which went on sale July 16, 1934. It was one in series of ten stamps created to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers. The green engraving on the stamp was taken from a photo of Yosemite National Park. On the first day of sale, 250,000 stamps were sold in the park and another 258,000 were sold in Washington D.C. The commemorative series was a part of the celebration of National Park Year.
  • landscape
    stamps
    national parks
    This is an eight-cent stamp featuring a green engraving of the Great White Throne in Zion National Park. The stamp was issued September 18, 1934 and was one in series of ten designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers during National Park Year. The engraving was made from a photograph by George Alexander Grant, the first chief photographer for the National Park Service.
  • landscape
    stamps
    national parks
    This is a six-cent stamp featuring a dark blue engraving of Crater Lake National Park. The park's namesake is a majestic deep blue lake created by volcanic eruption over seven thousand years ago. The stamp was issued September 5, 1934 and was one in series of ten designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers during National Park Year. The engraving was made from a photograph by George Alexander Grant, the first chief photographer for the National Park Service.
  • landscape
    stamps
    national parks
    This is a ten-cent stamp featuring a black engraving of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The stamp was issued October 8, 1934 and was one in series of ten commemorative stamps designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers during National Park Year. The engraving was made from a photograph by Thompson Company, most likely the Thompson Brothers. It was designed by Esther Richards, the first woman to design a U.S. postage stamp.
  • stamps
    national parks
    This is a five-cent stamp featuring a blue engraving of Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park. It was issued on July 30, 1934, one in a series of ten commemorative stamps designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers during National Park Year. Established in 1872, Yellowstone was the world’s first national park and is noted for its wildlife, geysers, hot springs, and waterfalls in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River. The engraving was taken from a photograph by Jack Ellis Haynes, often referred to as J. E. Haynes.
  • stamps
    national parks
    This is a stamp featuring an orange-red engraving of one of the most iconic landmarks in the National Park Service and the United States, the Grand Canyon. It was one in a series of ten stamps created to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, an avid stamp collector, selected the orange-red color for the stamp. The engraving was drawn from a photo taken by National Park Service chief photographer George Grant, the first person to hold that position. The stamp was part of a commemorative series in celebration of National Park Year.
  • landscape
    stamps
    national parks
    This is a seven-cent stamp featuring a black engraving of Acadia National Park. The park boasts the highest mountian on the East Coast, a variety of wildlife, and rocky beaches. The stamp was issued July 30, 1934 and was one in a series of ten commemorative stamps designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers during National Park Year. The engraving was made from a photograph by H. L. Bradley.
  • stamps
    national parks
    This is a four-cent stamp with a brown engraving of Cliff Palace in Mesa Verde National Park. The stamp was issued September 25, 1934, one in a commemorative series of ten designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers during National Park Year. The engraving was made from a photograph by National Park Service chief photographer George Grant, the first person to hold the position.
  • stamps
    national parks
    This is a three-cent stamp with a violet engraving of Mount Rainier National Park with the Mirror Lakes in the foreground. The stamp was issued August 3, 1934 and was one in a commemorative series of ten designed to promote the national parks and boost visitor numbers during National Park Year. Mount Rainer National Park became the fifth national park on March 2, 1889. In addition to its namesake Mount Rainer, a 14,410 ft. volcano, the park boasts reflection lakes, meadows, and glaciers. The engraving was made from a photograph by Asahel Curtis.