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  • Lee House
    bookcase
    Blair House
    This photograph is of the secretary-bookcase in the Truman Study in Lee House, one of four buildings that constitute the President's Guest House. The late 18th century secretary-bookcase is displaying the Blair family English (Worcester) Chamberlain porcelain dessert set, likely made between 1847 and 1850. The set is decorated with floral motifs, gilt, and a maroon banding. Located on Pennsylvania Avenue, just across the street from the North Grounds of the White House, Lee House was built in 1859 by Francis Preston Blair for his daughter Elizabeth and her husband, Admiral Samuel Phillips Lee. Blair built the house next door to his residence, the more prominent and recognizable Blair House. President Harry S. Truman used this room as a home office and study while the Truman family resided in Blair House during the 1948-1952 White House renovation.
  • china service
    bookcase
    Family Dining Room
    These French porcelain service pieces, shown here on display in a bookcase in the White House Family Dining Room, were made by Tressemannes and Vogt of Limoges, France, in 1892. They are part of a state china service that President Benjamin Harrison first ordered for the White House. The service featured a dark blue border, corn and goldenrod decorations, 44 gold stars representing the number of states in the Union when Harrison purchased the china and a design similar to the one found on the Lincoln china, with an eagle standing atop a shield, combining similar elements as the iconography from the Great Seal and the Seal of the President.
  • breakfront
    bookcase
    china
    This Sheraton-style breakfront bookcase was possibly made in Baltimore circa 1800-1805. It has been on display in the Ground Floor Corridor since it became a part of the White House Collection in 1970. The bookcase is used to display examples of presidential china and glassware services.
  • breakfront
    bookcase
    china
    This Sheraton-style breakfront bookcase was possibly made in Baltimore circa 1800-1805. It has been on display in the Ground Floor Corridor since it became a part of the White House Collection in 1970. The bookcase is used to display examples of presidential china and glassware services. The photograph, taken during the Nixon Administration, is from the side, providing a better view of the detail in the front.
  • desk
    bookcase
    This mahogany desk and bookcase was built between 1815 and 1820 and is attributed to Duncan Phyfe of New York. The gothic arched mullions and the cylinder front with fold-out writing surface are characteristic of Phyfe's furniture. Phyfe was born in Scotland and emigrated to New York in 1784. He became one of the premiere cabinet makers in the United States during the first half of the 19th century, known for blending the previous English Neoclassical and Regency styles together in a distinctive way. Phyfe benefited from his location in New York City on Fulton Street, where he was able to ship his furniture out to the southern States and the rich cotton magnates there, as well as to international ports.
  • bookcase
    desk
    This mahogany cylinder desk and bookcase, made of kingwood and striped maple, has gilded mounts and pulls, mirror plate, and glass. The desk was a gift of the White House Historical Association in 2000.
  • desk
    bookcase
    This is the makers mark on John Shaw's 1797 desk and bookcase. The book case was a gift of the Hendler Foundation, in memory of Lionel Manuel Hendler, in 1963.
  • desk
    bookcase
    This is the upper detail of John Shaw's 1797 desk and bookcase. The delicately carved pediment is one of Shaw's finest works. The pieces were a gift of the Hendler Foundation, in memory of Lionel Manuel Hendler, in 1963.
  • bookcase
    This mahogany Federal period bookcase was made in Philadelphia for a Pennsylvania banking family in the first decade of the 19th century. The bookcase was a gift of Yale University in honor of Francis P. Garvan in 1962.
  • desk
    bookcase
    This mahogany desk and bookcase was built in 1797 by John Shaw, the most prominent cabinetmaker in Annapolis, Maryland. It has a delicately carved and pierced pediment and inlaid conch shell on the fall board. These pieces were a gift of the Hendler Foundation, in memory of Lionel Manuel Hendler, in 1963.
  • desk
    bookcase
    This mahogany tambour desk and bookcase made by John and Thomas Seymour was modeled after English designs. The desk has urn-shaped ivory keyhole escutcheons and the rich veneers and inlays characteristic of the Seymours. The desk was the gift of an anonymous donor and the White House Historical Association to the White House in 1974.
  • breakfront
    bookcase
    This is a mahogany breakfront bookcase. This piece is one of two made for the Willing family of Philadelphia around 1800.
  • desk
    bookcase
    This is the lower detail of John Shaw's 1797 desk and bookcase. The pieces were a gift of the Hendler Foundation, in memory of Lionel Manuel Hendler, in 1963.
  • breakfront
    bookcase
    This Sheraton-style breakfront bookcase was possibly made in Baltimore circa 1800-1805. It has been on display in the Ground Floor Corridor since it became a part of the White House Collection in 1970. The bookcase is used to display examples of presidential china and glassware services. The photograph was taken during the Nixon Administration.