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White House Fences and Gates: Press Album

These images are being provided for press purposes only. For all other uses, please send your inquiries to rights@whha.org.
  • Ornamental Gardens, the White House Greenhouse, and Downing's Fence
    Unknown
    South Lawn
    This photograph of the South Lawn of the White House Grounds was taken around 1875. The South Portico of the Executive Mansion is clearly visible in the background, standing high above the ornamental gardens of the era and the first White House greenhouse (the small structure to the left), which was a relocated orangery. The ornamental garden is fenced in by a delicate, latticework screen designed by landscape designer Andrew Jackson Downing. The fence's intricate design was topped with small finials, each bearing the United States Shields with the intention of creating a barrier from intrusion on the gardens, but a barrier that could be easily seen through.
  • Drawing of Downing's Ornate Fence
    Office of Public Buildings and Public Parks of the National Capital
    South Lawn
    This drawing is an almost life-size depiction of the ornamental ironwork fence that surrounded the ornamental garden on the South Lawn of the White House Grounds, near the South Portico. Compared to the fences surrounding the White House Grounds, this fence was a lightweight, latticework screen used simply to prevent intrusion into the garden. The fence had legs and was not dug into the ground, providing a delicate barrier. The intricate design was topped with small finials, each bearing the United States Shields, and was the work of landscape designer Andrew Jackson Downing. This drawing was created under the Office of Public Buildings and Grounds, later known as the Office of Public Buildings and Public Parks of the National Capital. To see a photograph of the fence, please see image 1112836.
  • Visitors at the White House, Nixon Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    tourists
    north view
    This photograph of visitors outside the north fence of the White House was taken by Joseph H. Bailey in April 1974, during the Richard M. Nixon administration. In this photograph, one of the visitors can be seen posing with the North Portico in the background.
  • Visitors at the White House, Nixon Administration
    Joseph H. Bailey
    tourists
    north view
    This photograph of visitors outside the north fence of the White House was taken by Joseph H. Bailey in April 1974, during the Richard M. Nixon administration. In this photograph, one of the visitors can be seen posing with the North Portico in the background.
  • Original Wooden Fence Line
    United States National Park Service
    drawings & plans
    This drawing shows the location of the original wooden fence built during the Jefferson administration around the white house in relation to the modern layout of the house and grounds.
  • North View of the White House
    Bruce White
    north view
    North Portico
    This photograph is of the North Portico and north lawn of the White House. Tourists pause in front of the fence to take photos while a uniformed police officer observes.
  • Ornamental Iron Fence, South Grounds
    Unknown
    south view
    This black and white photograph is of the ornamental iron fence and gate around the South Grounds of the White House as they were in the early 1870s.
  • Vietnam Protestors at the North Fence, 1966
    James P. Blair
    protest
    north view
    This is a photograph taken by National Geographic Service photographer James P. Blair of the Vietnam protestors lining the North Gates of the White House in June 1966 during the Lyndon B. Johnson administration.
  • Vietnam Protestors at the North Fence, 1966
    James P. Blair
    protest
    north view
    This is a photograph taken by National Geographic Service photographer James P. Blair of Vietnam War protestors handing out flyers and lining the North Gates of the White House in June 1966.
  • Sentry on Duty at the White House Gates, Civil War Era
    Montgomery Cunningham Meigs
    Civil War
    staff
    north view
    This black and white stereograph by Montgomery Cunningham Meigs shows a sentry standing near the iron gates around the White House during the Civil War. The fencing was intended to help control public access to the White House from the street.
  • Northeast Gate on Pennsylvania Avenue
    Jack E. Boucher
    north view
    This photograph of the northeast gate of the White House was taken by Jack E. Boucher for the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) in 1992. The northeast gate of the White House opens onto Pennsylvania Avenue.
  • Horse-Drawn Hack Leaving Through the North Gates
    Unknown
    transportation
    north view
    This black and white photograph from 1903 depicts two unidentified men in a horse-drawn hack leaving the White House Grounds through the North Gates. The hack is positioned facing toward the State, War, and Navy building.
  • Lamp on Northwest Gate
    Bruce White
    north view
    This photograph is of an iron lamp on the northwest gate of the White House. It is one of four installed in 1852 that remain in place today. One of the lamps is inscribed "Jos. Newmann / Phila. Pa."
  • Northwest Entry Gate
    Bruce White
    north view
    This photograph is of the current entry gate on the northwest side of the north lawn of the White House. Installed in 1976, the design of the gates mimics the nineteenth century iron gates, including the lower section of overlapping arches and upper right and left spandrels, which form a completed arch when the gates are closed.
  • Old White House Gates
    Bruce White
    White House Grounds
    This photograph is of two restored pieces of nineteenth-century White House gates, discovered on the grounds of River Farm, headquarters of the American Horticultural Society in Alexandria, Virginia. The metal was carefully restored and put on public display in 2005.
  • Northwest Gate at Dusk
    Bruce White
    North View
    This photograph of the Northwest Gate of the White House was taken in the evening by Bruce White for the White House Historical Association on May 30, 2013.
  • East Facade of the White House
    Bruce White
    East View
    This photograph of the East Facade of the White House was taken by Bruce White for the White House Historical Association on November 5, 2015. James Hoban, the original architect of the White House, designed the windows and Scottish stonemasons expertly crafted their ornate details. The North Gate is the foreground of the picture.
  • Lafayette Park from the White House
    Bruce White
    Lafayette Park
    This photograph of Lafayette Park from the north drive of White House was taken by Bruce White for the White House Historical Association on April 17, 2013. A northern red oak dominates the foreground of the picture, which was taken on a rainy evening, with Pennsylvania Avenue stretching across the view just beyond the gates.
  • President Kennedy at the North Gate
    Abbie Rowe
    north view
    staff
    This photograph by Abbie Rowe of the National Park Service shows President John F. Kennedy and others entering the White House grounds through the North Gate.
  • Suffragette Alison Turnbull Hopkins Holds Banner at Northwest Corner of White House Grounds
    Unknown
    protest
    This is a photograph of Suffragette Alison Trumbull Hopkins holding a banner which reads "Mr. President how long must we wait for liberty" at the North Gates of the White House, ca. 1917.
  • President Eisenhower and Heidi
    Unknown
    pets
    This photograph shows President Dwight Eisenhower walking outside with his pet dog, Heidi, alongside him and behind a fence. Heidi, a Weimaraner breed, was a beloved family and national pet. She only lived at the White House for a short time before going to live on the Eisenhower farm in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, where she had puppies.
  • North Entry Gate
    Bruce White
    north view
    This photograph is of the current entry gate on the northeast side of the north lawn of the White House. Installed in 1976, the design of the gates mimics the nineteenth century iron gates, including the lower section of overlapping arches and upper right and left spandrels, which form a completed arch when the gates are closed.
  • President Johnson Greets Tourists at the Southeast Gate
    Abbie Rowe
    tourists
    press
    This black and white photograph by National Parks Service photographer Abbie Rowe shows President Johnson speaking with a group of tourists at the southeast gate of the White House grounds. Several reporters are grouped around Johnson inside the gate while outside, a young girl reaches for the president's hand.
  • Crowd Gathers at News of Franklin D. Roosevelt's Death
    Abbie Rowe
    funeral
    north view
    This is a photograph taken by National Park Service photographer Abbie Rowe on April 12, 1945. It shows crowds gathering at the north gates of the White House upon hearing the news of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's death. Rowe was a prolific photographer, providing extensive coverage of the presidency from the Franklin D. Roosevelt through the Lyndon B. Johnson administrations.
  • Tourists Outside of the White House
    J. Fulton
    tourists
    south view
    This photograph by J. Fulton of National Geographic Service shows visitors gathered around the south fence of the White House.